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8 items from 2010


Framed: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

30 December 2010 8:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

Welcome to Framed, a column at Cinematical that runs every Thursday and celebrates the artistry of cinema -- one frame at a time.

It's been six months since 'Framed' started at Cinematical -- with Duncan Jones' haunting tale, 'Moon' -- and during that time I've examined a variety of films, but I can't think of a movie I'd be more excited to close out the year with than Sergio Leone's epic western, 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.' Leone's film reimagines the classic western and shakes the dust off of Hollywood's good guys versus bad guys gimmick. There's a bit of everything in Leone's final installment of the 'The Man with No Name' Trilogy (aka the Dollars Trilogy): it's beautifully violent, offbeat and humorous, has an unforgettable soundtrack (thanks to maestro Ennio Morricone), impeccable direction, colorful characters and a palpable atmosphere.

While the plot is entertaining enough, »

- Alison Nastasi

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Framed: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

30 December 2010 8:00 AM, PST | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

Welcome to Framed, a column at Cinematical that runs every Thursday and celebrates the artistry of cinema -- one frame at a time.

It's been six months since 'Framed' started at Cinematical -- with Duncan Jones' haunting tale, 'Moon' -- and during that time I've examined a variety of films, but I can't think of a movie I'd be more excited to close out the year with than Sergio Leone's epic western, 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.' Leone's film reimagines the classic western and shakes the dust off of Hollywood's good guys versus bad guys gimmick. There's a bit of everything in Leone's final installment of the 'The Man with No Name' Trilogy (aka the Dollars Trilogy): it's beautifully violent, offbeat and humorous, has an unforgettable soundtrack (thanks to maestro Ennio Morricone), impeccable direction, colorful characters and a palpable atmosphere.

While the plot is entertaining enough, »

- Alison Nastasi

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Once Upon a Time in the West: No 3

19 October 2010 3:52 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Sergio Leone, 1968

A Marxist revisionist western that feels like a comedy half the time and a revenger's tragedy in operatic guise for the other half. On paper at least, this looks like the very last western worthy of admission to the pantheon of the genre's masterworks. But there it is, routinely counted among the greatest westerns ever made. And rightly so.

Leone, together with Dario Argento and Bernardo Bertolucci, initially conceived a western almost entirely made up of references to the classics of the genre – The Iron Horse, The Searchers, Shane and High Noon are just some of the movies plundered and revered in the final three-hour epic. The film has an unabashedly leftwing tilt in its depiction of capitalism's ruthless conquest of the west as it crushes or kills every obstacle in its path.

If that all sounds a little dry to you, then Leone knew enough to cast »

- John Patterson

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Music in the movies: Basil Poledouris

4 October 2010 8:33 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our latest Music in the Movies column celebrates the work of composer Basil Poledouris, whose themes have graced such movies as Conan The Barbarian and Starship Troopers...

Basil Poledouris is among my favourite composers with him having provided scores for many great films throughout his career, including one of my favourite all time iconic theme tunes for Robocop, as featured in the Iconic Themes article (linked below).

Here are some of my favourite Poledouris compositions:

Conan The Barbarian (1982)

It's hard to imagine that the original plan for the soundtrack for Conan was for it to be comprised of sourced pop songs. I'm not sure it would have fit with the mood of the film.

When the pop song idea was scrapped, a number of composers were considered, including Ennio Morricone, but director John Milius handed the job to a former classmate of his, Basil Poledouris.

Poledouris' score is packed full »

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Forgotten Films: Edgar Wright’s A Fistful of Fingers

13 August 2010 6:23 AM, PDT | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

Forgotten Films [1] is a semi-regular feature on Film Junk where we explore interesting movies that have fallen off the radar or slipped through the cracks over the years. You probably know Edgar Wright as the man behind the camera for most of Simon Pegg and Nick Frost's collaborations including Hot Fuzz, Shaun of the Dead, and even before that, the TV show Spaced. However, with Scott Pilgrim vs. The World coming out this weekend, I thought it would be a good time to look back at his very first feature film, a hard-to-find low budget comedy made without Pegg and Frost called A Fistful of Fingers. Edgar Wright got his start making movies in England at a very young age, and by the time he was 18, he was already generating some fairly high quality stuff. If you have the Hot Fuzz special edition DVD or Blu-ray, you may have »

- Sean

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Mike Patton's 'Mondo Cane' Coming Soon

15 March 2010 9:02 AM, PDT | FEARnet | See recent FEARnet news »

Fans of classic Italian genre movie scores, especially the works of legendary composer Ennio Morricone, have a kindred spirit in multi-talented artist Mike Patton – former Faith No More vocalist and the creative force behind supremely twisted bands like Fantomas, Mr. Bungle and Peeping Tom. Patton's passion for the works of Morricone and other maestros comes into play with the arrival of Mondo Cane (which itself takes its title from the Italian shockumentary that started a decades-long cult cinema trend). Find out more about the album and hear Mike belt out a classic tune after the jump! Recorded live during a series of European performances (including a classy outdoor concert in Northern Italy), the eleven-track CD »

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Yogoto No Yume as you have never heard it before

25 February 2010 2:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Scoring a silent film is a daunting responsibility. But Nitin Sawhney jumped at a chance to breathe musical life into the dark cinematic world of Yogoto No Yume

Ihave been a film and television composer for many years, but have only scored one silent movie: German director Franz Osten's 1929 epic Prapancha Pash (A Throw of Dice), which was a great experience. So I was delighted when the British Film Institute asked me to work again with the London Symphony Orchestra on a new silent film project.

The film in question is a Japanese one. Yogoto No Yume (Every Night Dreams) is a 1933 silent movie directed by Mikio Naruse, a prolific but unappreciated director. The story focuses on the life and struggle of Japanese barmaid, Omitsu. Set against a backdrop of the Great Depression (which also affected Japan, though to a far lesser extent than America and Europe), the plot »

- Nitin Sawhney

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Discuss: Favorite Movie Scores

24 February 2010 2:33 PM, PST | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Although hearing isn't the sense that moves quickest and deepest into our emotional memory, a favorite movie soundtrack can definitely dash almost as quickly to the center of your brain as a smell when it comes to recalling a certain scene, the memory of listening to it driving in the car, or smooching in the theater. A lot of the time, these are actual compilations of songs - Pump Up the Volume and Pretty in Pink are the first that spring to mind for me - but sometimes they're scores from an iconic composer.

David Lynch movies like Blue Velvet or Wild at Heart would still, for better or for worse, be David Lynch movies without Angelo Badalamenti's scores, but they'd be absolutely lacking, whether we knew it or not. Ennio Morricone is another unmistakable composer, most famously perhaps for his work on Sergio Leone's spaghetti westerns - »

- Jenni Miller

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8 items from 2010


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