7.8/10
19,255
181 user 96 critic

Dear Frankie (2004)

PG-13 | | Drama, Romance | 15 April 2005 (USA)
After having responded to her son's numerous letters in the guise of his father, a woman hires a stranger to pose as his dad when meeting him.

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Writer:

(screenplay)

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ON DISC
8 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Mary Riggans ...
Nell
...
Marie
Sophie Main ...
Serious Girl
Katy Murphy ...
Miss MacKenzie
...
Jayd Johnson ...
Anna Hepburn ...
Headmistress
Rony Bridges ...
Post Office Clerk
Douglas Stewart Wallace ...
Stamp Shop Keeper
Elaine M. Ellis ...
Librarian (as Elaine Mackenzie Ellis)
Carolyn Calder ...
Barmaid
John Kazek ...
Ally
...
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Storyline

Nine-year-old Frankie and his single mum Lizzie have been on the move ever since Frankie can remember, most recently arriving in a seaside Scottish town. Wanting to protect her deaf son from the truth that they've run away from his father, Lizzie has invented a story that he is away at sea on the HMS Accra. Every few weeks, Lizzie writes Frankie a make-believe letter from his father, telling of his adventures in exotic lands. As Frankie tracks the ship's progress around the globe, he discovers that it is due to dock in his hometown. With the real HMS Accra arriving in only a fortnight, Lizzie must choose between telling Frankie the truth or finding the perfect stranger to play Frankie's father for just one day... Written by Pathe

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

stranger | letter | seaside | dock | boy | See All (148) »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Release Date:

15 April 2005 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Querido Frankie  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$37,542 (USA) (4 March 2005)

Gross:

$1,340,891 (USA) (1 July 2005)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jack McElhone (Frankie) is not deaf but worked with a speech coach so that his one spoken line would sound correct. See more »

Goofs

In one of Frankie's letters to his dad, the text of the letter does not correspond to the voiceover. We hear Frankie say, "Ricky Munroe told me. Trust him to put his big feet right in it." but the letter reads, "Trust him to put his size threes right in it." See more »

Quotes

[writing a letter to his dad]
Frankie (Voice-Over): Dear Da, did you know something? We're moving again. Ma says it's time. She says it's definitely the last time but she says that every single time. Nana Gourley says, if there is a next time, they'll have to carry her out in a box and ma says don't tempt her!
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Crazy Credits

Special thanks to ... all at Deaf Connections, ... all at Sigma Films, ... Esther and Harvey ... See more »

Soundtracks

The Secret Sun
(2003)
Written by Jesse Harris
Published by Sony / ATV Music Publishing Ltd.
Performed by Jesse Harris and The Ferdinandos
Courtesy of the Verve Music Group
Licensed by kind permission from the Universal Film & TV Licensing Division
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
How naive to think that all movies do not "manipulate"
14 August 2004 | by (Los Angeles) – See all my reviews

I thought "Dear Frankie" was a delightful film. It was supposed to be a tear jerker! I felt the acting was true (especially the work done by the child who played Frankie) and that the story, while fanciful in some portions, was good. In my opinion, the story was about the lengths a parent will go to in protecting their child from the ugliness of the world. Why must films always emulate reality? What is wrong with telling just a sweet, gentle story? Emily Mortimer was great, portraying a woman who had to be strong, yet who was also vulnerable, who was barely holding life together for her son and mother. Jack McElhone was terrific as her son. He was neither a cloyingly innocent deaf "victim" or the smart butt kid typically portrayed in current films. Gerard Butler did a good job of conveying "the man behind the disguise" as his interaction with Frankie progressed. I saw this film at the LA Film Festival, and judging by the audience reaction, I was not the only viewer who was enchanted by this movie. Those of you looking for a gritty slice of life would be wise to avoid "Dear Frankie". But if you want to spend some time in a world were parents DO care and good things do happen to those who are deserving, then this is the film for you.


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