5.9/10
19
2 user

Star 34 (1954)

A young Eastern couple fall heir to a Kansas farm, on which they must reside for a certain time in order to qualify for inheritance. Their visits to well over a hundred scenic and ... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Herk Harvey ...
William Jonathan 'Bill' Asher
James Lantz ...
Narrator (voice)
Dan Palmquist ...
Spying Man
Shirley Rae ...
Mary Asher
Lathrop B. Read ...
Mr. Price
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Storyline

A young Eastern couple fall heir to a Kansas farm, on which they must reside for a certain time in order to qualify for inheritance. Their visits to well over a hundred scenic and historical points of Kansas lead the couple to permanent residence there. Written by Anonymous

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Short

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Release Date:

3 June 1954 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
There's no place like Kansas

Young couple Bill and Mary Astor have to live on a farm in Kansas in order to collect a full inheritance from Bill's recently deceased Aunt Emily. Director Herk Harvey, who also plays Bill with appealing earnestness, basically uses the premise to provide a nice and illuminating overview of both the history of Kansas and its most notable landmarks: Besides a rundown on John Brown (gotta love that amazing painting!), we also get to see the wide open spaces of Kansas in all their breathtaking verdant splendor as well as striking shots of wheat fields, salt marshes, rock formations, military posts, capitol buildings, and buffalo herds. Robust narrator James Lantz rattles off a lot of neat facts. The slushy score is a bit much, but overall this rates as a lovely travelogue of the 34th state.


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