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Che: Part Two (2008)

Not Rated | | Biography, Drama, History | 24 January 2009 (USA)
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In 1967, Ernesto 'Che' Guevara leads a small partisan army to fight an ill-fated revolutionary guerrilla war in Bolivia, South America.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
2 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Fidel Castro (as Demian Bichir)
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María D. Sosa ...
Aleidita
Raúl Beltrán ...
Bolivian Customs Agent #1
Raúl 'Pitín' Gómez ...
Bolivian Customs Agent #2
Paty M. Bellott ...
Woman at Airport
Othello Rensoli ...
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Pablo Durán ...
Ezequiel Díaz ...
Loro (Jorge Vázquez Viaña)
Juan Salinas ...
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Storyline

In 1965, Ernesto 'Che' Guevara resigns from his Cuban government posts to secretly make his latest attempt to spread the revolution in Bolivia. After arriving in La Paz, Bolivia late in 1966, by 1967, Che with several Cuban volunteers, have raised a small guerrilla army to take on the militarist Bolivian movement. However, Che must face grim realities about his few troops and supplies, his failing health, and a local population who largely does not share the idealistic aspirations of a foreign troublemaker. As the US supported Bolivian army prepares to defeat him, Che and his beleaguered force struggle against the increasingly hopeless odds. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


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Not Rated | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

24 January 2009 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Che  »

Box Office

Budget:

$40,000,000 (estimated)
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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Lou Diamond Phillips, he did constant language drills with a vocal coach to learn his lines in Spanish. When he arrived on the set, the part was completely rewritten and he had to do more constant drills to learn his new lines. See more »

Goofs

When the guerrillas are crossing the Rio Grande, one guerrilla, armed with a bolt-action M43 Spanish Mauser, is shown in a close up raising it over his head. When the camera switches to a close up of the guerrilla in front of him (armed with an M1 Garand), he is seen doing the exact same motion, down to how his equipment jostles, in the background. See more »

Quotes

Ernesto Che Guevara: To survive here, to win... you have to live as if you've already died.
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Connections

Followed by Che: Part One (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Balderrama
Lyrics by Manuel José Castilla
Music by Gustavo Leguizamon
Performed by Mercedes Sosa
Courtesy of Universal Music
Copyright (c) by Lagos Editorial (Warner/Chappell Music Argentina)
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User Reviews

 
Che: A Comment.
31 January 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

In terms of a (loose) description, part one of this two part series covers Ernesto Che Guevara's travels, alongside Fidel Castro, from Mexico to Cuba and his rise, organizing and leading his fighters, finally culminating in Castro's seizure of power in Cuba from Fulgencio Batista. The second film, rather different in tone and spirit from its companion, focuses primarily on his efforts in Bolivia, tracking his gradual downfall Little of Guevara's personal life aside from his activism is detailed, which is both a little surprising and somewhat vexing, especially when one considers the combined duration of both films is well over four hours. There is, of course, nothing inherently wrong with a filmed biography limiting itself to just one or two particular aspects of its subject's diverse life; such an approach can ensure better focus on the material, as opposed to risking the potential the audience may become lost in a rambling, disjointed account in which too few events in the subjects life are explored with adequate depth and clarity.

The pair of films, overall, are most memorable for their sequences of Guevara's guerrilla army training and battling in the jungles and waters of Cuba and Bolivia and especially for the climactic battles near the end of each film. They may each be overlong and not chart as much territory as they perhaps should. Some may wish they would delve further into the obscure intimacies of his life, especially for the benefit of those already familiar with his activism. Others may feel the film does not question his militant means often or strongly enough. No, the films are not perfect, but lesser movies than these have been well received and, as such, these two are worth a look.


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