Campfire (2004) - News Poster

(2004)

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‘Norman’ Teaser Trailer: Richard Gere Networks His Way Through New York’s Moneyed Class

  • Indiewire
‘Norman’ Teaser Trailer: Richard Gere Networks His Way Through New York’s Moneyed Class
In the new film “Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer,” Norman Oppenheimer (Richard Gere) will do anything to feel like he matters. A lonely man on the margins of New York City power and money, Norman dreams up financial schemes and tries to bring them to life by incessantly networking. Then one day, he buys an Israeli politician an expensive pair of shoes and soon he’s flush with respect and caught in the crossfires of a potential international catastrophe. The film co-stars Lior Ashkenazi (“Late Marriage”), Michael Sheen (“Frost/Nixon”), Steve Buscemi (“Mystery Train”), Dan Stevens (“Downton Abbey”), Hank Azaria (“The Simpsons”) and more. Watch a teaser trailer below.

Read More: ‘Norman’ Finds Richard Gere in a Coen-Like Comedy With More Chutzpah Than Charm — Telluride Review

The film is written and directed by Joseph Cedar. He wrote and directed the 2011 film “Footnote,” which
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘Baba Joon’

Film Review: ‘Baba Joon’
In this period of greater nuclear tensions between Israel and Iran, who would have guessed that Israel’s foreign-language Oscar submission would be mostly in Farsi? “Baba Joon” is a coming-of-age drama from debuting feature writer-director Yuval Delshad set in a Persian-immigrant moshav in the Negev during the early 1980s. Although some may find it a tad too sentimental and under-nuanced, the film depicts the ways of a community infrequently seen on Israeli screens. More universally, it provides a metaphor for the struggle between the migrant generation, which is holding on to the past and traditions from another country, and the sabra generation born into a new identity and seeking out a fresh path. Expect generous fest and niche arthouse play offshore.

Three generations of the stubborn Morgian family struggle to manage a ramshackle turkey farm in an isolated desert community of Farsi-speakers. There’s the aging grandfather (Rafael Faraj
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Patrick Stewart Returns To The Big Screen In The Trailer For Hunting Elephants

You might have noticed that it's been a very long while since we've seen Patrick Stewart's presence on the big screen. It's been several years in fact, during which his voice did most of the acting, from video games and animated movies to everything by Seth MacFarlane. But now it seems that his actual face will accompany his voice, in a new Israeli film of all places.Sir Patrick will play an eccentric Brit in the upcoming crime comedy Hunting Elephants who joins a group Israeli misfits in a bank heist. Its the third feature comedy by writer-director Reshef Levi and stars some of Israel's own acting nobility, including Moni Moshonov (Late Marriage), Sasson Gabai (The Band's Visit) and Moshe Ivgy (Campfire).Jonathan is a boy genius...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

DVD Review: Tedium Overtakes Journey of ‘The Loneliest Planet’

Chicago – “The Loneliest Planet,” recently released on DVD, will try even the most patient and adoring of art movie lovers as its deliberate, plodding pace pushes out all possibilities of character involvement. To be blunt, by the time I felt like I was asked to care, it was too late. There’s some stunning cinematography and Gael Garcia Bernal is simply one of the most interesting actors of his generation but this effort is dull to the nth degree.

Rating: 2.5/5.0

The first hour of “The Loneliest Planet” is clearly designed to create realism that will allow us to emotionally invest in the characters and the inner turmoil they face in a barren landscape in the second hour. While the cinematography is stunning and the natural, unforced interplay between the stars feels genuine, the film drags in unacceptable ways (especially at home…on the big screen, the striking imagery might have
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Futures: 'The Loneliest Planet' Star Hani Furstenberg Movies Beyond the Israeli Stage

Futures: 'The Loneliest Planet' Star Hani Furstenberg Movies Beyond the Israeli Stage
Why She's On Our Radar: Hani Furstenberg has already made great strides as an actress in the Israeli theater with occasional, and equally successful, forays into film. She has already worked with two giants of contemporary Israeli cinema: Eytan Fox, who cast her in the gay soldier drama "Yossi and Jagger," as well as Joseph Cedar, whose "Campfire" brought the actress an Israeli Oscar. Only now, however, has Furtenberg made her way into an English language movie, and it's a fairly humble start: In "The Loneliest Planet," which premiered at the Locarno Film Festival and opens this Friday in limited release, she holds her own opposite Gael Garcia Bernal as one half of a couple journeying through the mountains of the Georgian peninsula and unsure about the future of their relationship. Directed by Julia Loktev ("Day Night Day Night"), the movie relies on pregnant pauses and other quiet details that provides a real showcase for.
See full article at Indiewire »

Tiff Futures | "The Loneliest Planet" Co-Star Hani Furstenberg Moves Beyond the Israeli Stage

Tiff Futures |
Why She's On Our Radar: Furstenberg has already made great strides as an actress in the Israeli theater with occasional, and equally successful, forays into film. She has already worked with two giants of contemporary Israeli cinema: Eytan Fox, who cast her in the gay soldier drama "Yossi and Jagger," as well as Joseph Cedar, whose "Campfire" brought the actress an Israeli Oscar. Only now, however, has Furtenberg made her ...
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Festival: The headline is 'Footnote,' now leading my list of Cannes favorites

Cannes Film Festival: The headline is 'Footnote,' now leading my list of Cannes favorites
The rich helping of grand Movie Music ladled over the great Israeli drama Footnote is just one of the many touches from filmmaker Joseph Cedar that make this invigorating Competition entry my favorite movie to date. (To date, by the way, is Saturday early evening, after a screening of the sadistic and meaninglessly voyeuristic Austrian pedophile drama Michael and before a screening of the latest from the Dardennes brothers.) Yes indeed, the music assures, there is no dramatic subject more titanic, more fraught, more Biblically elemental, more hilariously heartbreaking (or is it heartbreakingly hilarious?) and (in Cedar’s talented hands
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Cannes: Sony Classics Acquires Competition Title 'Footnote'

New York (May 13, 2011) -- Sony Pictures Classics announced today that they have acquired all North American and Latin American rights to Joseph Cedar’s Footnote from WestEnd Films. The film is a contender for the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Palme D’Or. Cedar’s last film Beaufort was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film in 2008. Footnote follows a great rivalry between a father and his son, their need for each other and their need for respect and recognition in the world. The film stars Shlomo Bar Aba and Lior Ashkenazi, and was produced by David Mandill (Beaufort, Campfire) and United King (Lebanon, Walk On Water). “Sony Pictures Classics represents the best in world cinema,” explained WestEnd chairman and co-founder Sharon Harel. “They are the perfect home for this wonderful film and very special director.” “When we met Joseph Cedar a few years ago, we knew he was a director of extraordinary talent.
See full article at Deadline »

World Film Report Israeli: Eran Kolirin's The Exchange and Folman's The Congress

There are a number of new projects by the more established filmmakers that are currently in the post-production phases, the most anticipated is perhaps The Band's Visit's Eran Kolirin, who is in the editing stages of The Exchange. - Israeli Film Scene: Local The Israeli film scene appears to be in a hibernation mode right now. "Appears to be" – but isn't necessarily. There is only one Israeli film in local theaters now – it is Phobidilia by the Paz brothers. Based on a book by Izhar Harlev, "Phobidilia" tells the story of a young man, once a high-tech genius, now an agoraphobic. After spending the last couple of years of his life inside his apartment, and never leaving it, he is faced with the biggest challenge ever: A young and beautiful girl enters his life, and his landlord wishes to evacuate him. Both destabilize his life, and tranquility is shattered.
See full article at ioncinema »

Kino brings israeli, Turk films to U.S.

Kino brings israeli, Turk films to U.S.
NEW YORK -- Art house distributor Kino International has acquired all domestic rights to Joseph Cedar's Israeli war feature Beaufort and Reda Erdem's Turkish drama Bes vakit (Times and Winds).

The fact-based Beaufort looks at an Israeli army unit during the final days of its withdrawal from the Lebanese border after nearly two decades of occupation. The film earned Cedar best director honors at this year's Berlin Film Festival and is nominated for next month's Israeli Film Academy best feature award. His two previous films, Medurat Hashevet (Campfire) and Hahseder (Time of Favor), each took home the top IFA award.

Winds follows three adolescents in a small Turkish village as they struggle against the confines of their traditional parents. The film premiered at last year's Toronto International Film Festival and won the FIPRESCI and best Turkish film awards at the 2006 Istanbul Film Festival.

Kino plans an early 2008 platform release of Beaufort beginning in New York, Los Angeles and Boston. They will release Winds in New York in November after it screens at the Anthology Film Archives' Turkish Film Showcase.

Israel nods light 'Campfire'

Israel nods light 'Campfire'
TEL AVIV, Israel -- Campfire was named best picture at the 15th Israel Academy of Film and Television Awards, which took place Monday in Tel Aviv's Opera House and was broadcast live by commercial Channel 2 franchisee Telad. Campfire tells the story of a widowed Jerusalem mother's attempts to join the settler movement and examines the tribal nature of Israeli society. Produced by David Mandil and Eyal Shiray, the film will be Israel's entry for foreign-language Oscar consideration. Campfire, the only film to be nominated in all 13 categories, picked up four additional awards. Joseph Cedar, whose Time of Favor was Israel's Oscar entry in 2000, was named best director and best screenwriter; Hani Furstenberg was named best supporting actress; and Einat Glazer Zarchin was named best editor.

Israeli noms hot for 'Campfire'

Israeli noms hot for 'Campfire'
TEL AVIV, Israel -- With 13 nominations, one in every category, director and screenwriter Joseph Cedar's Campfire is the frontrunner for the 15th Israeli Academy of Film and Television Awards, scheduled for Sept. 27. The contest for the nominations, announced Monday, was the hottest ever, with a record 23 films for the Academy's 700 members to consider. Israeli film production averages about 9 films a year. Cedar's film follows a Jerusalem widow's attempts to join the settler movement and, like the director's previous award-winning film Time of Favor, explores Israel's right-wing religious community. The film is due to screen at festivals in Calgary, Alberta; Toronto; Vienna, Austria; and Pusan, South Korea.

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