An aged miner finds a rich gold claim, stakes it out, fills a sack with samples of the gold ore and starts back across the desert to file his claim. His water gives out, and, after days of ... See full summary »
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Cast

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Jim Durkin
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Durkin's Partner, Black
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The Prospector
Brinsley Shaw ...
The Indian
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Storyline

An aged miner finds a rich gold claim, stakes it out, fills a sack with samples of the gold ore and starts back across the desert to file his claim. His water gives out, and, after days of torture, he at last falls in a clump of sagebrush. In a nearby cabin Jim Durkin and Black, his partner, are about to sit down to supper when faint cries are heard. Durkin hurries out, finds the stricken miner, summons Black and they carry the old man in and lay him on the bunk. Black is a heartless, brutal fellow, and the old man refuses to talk to Durkin until Black goes out into the adjoining room. Realizing death is upon him the old prospector now tells Durkin of the rich claim, shows him the ore samples, then gives him a paper on which is drawn the location of the mine. A few moments later he is dead. Durkin and Black now swear partnership in the lost mine, bury their old benefactor, then start out to locate the great wealth. That night. Black deserts Durkin on the desert, taking the pack train ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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directed by star | See All (1) »

Genres:

Short | Western

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Release Date:

11 May 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Tragic and showing much imagination
14 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A well-made picture in every way, tragic and showing much imagination. It is played by two white men and an Indian. The climax (brought about by the treachery of one of the white men and aided by the natural instinct of self-preservation in a thirsty Indian) comes in the midst of the dry desert, at night with a full moon and silvery, romantic light, a very beautiful picture. This follows a burning day and is, in turn, followed by a day of furnace heat. Knowledge of the claim was the legacy of a dead man. At the end of the last day, three more lives have been added to the list. They lie, one here, one there and one yonder. Then we see the claim in a dry corner of the rocks where there isn't even a vulture. It's a good picture. - The Moving Picture World, May 25, 1912


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