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6 out of 9 people found the following review useful:

Good ideas

Author: tabaddon from United States
2 April 2004

While some of the messages ("smoking kills") have a certain "duh" factor, the obvious isn't always obvious to everyone in this society. Otherwise, we wouldn't have many of the stupid and tragic accidents that we do. Gentle reminders now and then not to share your prescriptions with your kids, not to leave toddlers alone poolside, to monitor your kids' Internet activity, or to simply pay attention to your kids will certainly not be lost on many. Good on NBC for producing these cheap, tiny shorts. They certainly don't hurt anyone or cost anything, and if they keep one person from leaving their kid in a hot car, then they've done their job. (We never hear the near-miss stories, do we?)

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4 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

Obvious but helpful

Author: caramy
13 January 2004

I would hope that most people would either know the lessons taught in these segments or be teaching them to their children. Having said this, I think "The More You Know" has been a great way to reinforce to my kids the lessons I am constantly trying to teach them. My son has seen the lessons and is always pleased that his old mom thinks the same things as famous people. It's also been a great way to bring up the topic and a great reminder to my kids.

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8 out of 15 people found the following review useful:

Excellent Use of Commercial Time

Author: IK from NY
17 November 2004

Whoever thinks that this is "socialist propaganda" must think that America stands for illegal drug use, intolerance, hate crimes and violence.

While most of the public service announcements were on pretty obvious issues, the ones about tolerance (is that really a "left-leaning" only message?) were very effective in getting the point across.

Given that some people actually look up to TV stars (the why of this is beyond me), it's a good idea for them to issue more positive messages.

The important thing here is that the stars used and the language employed in these TV spots were age-appropriate, meaning that Jennifer Aniston or Matthew Perry would give a public service announcement for the teenage/early 20-something crowd.

All in all, this can't be a bad thing for television. Have you even seen the other garbage put on it?

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8 out of 15 people found the following review useful:

Obvious one-liners everyone should already know.

Author: deadcujo from California, United States
29 October 2003

NBC's series of "The More You Know" commercials, while possibly informative to very few, simply state the obvious. Thank you for the attempt at educating us, NBC, but I already know not to give my children drugs and to tell them not to get into strangers' cars. These commercials have all been weak five-second presentations which will not have any effect on parents or children, nor will their continued use give the celebrities who appear in them any recognition as being helpful or insightful in respect to the content of the commercials. I've been seeing these presentations on NBC for over a decade now, and have yet to view one that has left any impact on how I view their subjects.

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Need to be fired

1/10
Author: pjamok-692-397387 from United States
18 May 2014

Whoever thought it was a good idea to put Kris Kardashian on this public service announcement should be unemployed. It is insane that anyone would think she is a viable choice to inform the public of any issue that can offer insight or enlightenment to the general public. These are supposed to be smart, accomplished people with something to teach the general public. I had to immediately click to another station as everyone started screaming when they saw it come on. And she sound like she's reading it because we're pretty sure she doesn't actually "know" the information.

I will never be able to take any of them serious again.

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5 out of 10 people found the following review useful:

Now more than ever

Author: dmellor from Michigan
20 November 2004

Given the recent success of mis- and dis-information, these PSA seem more relevant than ever. A review of the contributors will give the reader a good indication of the broad base of support this project enjoyed. NBC has been producing these short "commercials" since 1989. THE MORE YOU KNOW public service campaign has been a widely recognized for its excellence and has been awarded Emmy and Peabody awards. The espoused goal is to educate and raise awareness about important societal issues. The campaign has also provided valuable referral and resource information through on-air public service announcements, print materials, local community outreach efforts and programming. In a time when FOX news passes for accurate information and CNN reads Whitehouse press releases without critical examination, we NEED these messages.

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10 out of 48 people found the following review useful:

Example of 90s Socialist Propaganda

Author: ScifiBrad from cleveland
26 August 2004

"The More You Know" was a series of so-called public service commercials during the 90s featuring rosy propaganda that glossed over difficult social issues. Good-looking television actors were the centerpiece of the commercials, in which they gave their gleaming smiles, talked softly, and acted compassionate. The ads generally had a liberal or socialist leaning and suggested that the solution to all social problems was for everyone to just befriend each other. Also, phrases such as "Knowledge is Power" were promoted without consideration for real social and economic forces. However, this series is a good example of propaganda which today would make people cringe.

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