In the age of the brand, logos are everywhere. But why do some of the world's best-known brands find themselves at the end of spray paint cans and the targets of anti-corporate campaigns? ... See full summary »

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In the age of the brand, logos are everywhere. But why do some of the world's best-known brands find themselves at the end of spray paint cans and the targets of anti-corporate campaigns? No Logo, based on the best-selling book by Canadian journalist and activist Naomi Klein, reveals the reasons behind the backlash against the increasing economic and cultural reach of multinational companies. Analysing how brands like Nike, The Gap, and Tommy Hilfiger became revered symbols worldwide, Klein argues that globalisation is a process whereby corporations discovered that profits lay not in making products (outsourced to low-wage workers in developing countries), but in creating branded identities people adopt in their lifestyles. Using hundreds of media examples, No Logo shows how the commercial takeover of public space, the restriction of 'choice', and replacement of real jobs with temporary work - the dynamics of corporate globalisation - impact everyone, everywhere... Written by Fraghera

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Brands, Globalization & Resistance

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Documentary | Short

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1 July 2003 (USA)  »

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OK introduction to problems with international corporations and global trade...
31 July 2011 | by See all my reviews

Now that's a sexy summary... :)

If you wanted to know what's the deal with all the complaints about corporations and with the way they create global economy, this is a good place to get your basics. Famous author Naomi Klein introduces the audience to various seductive ways corporations use to sell their products and various unseductive ways they use to produce their goods as cheaply as possible. Even if you already know all this, you'll still probably learn something new during the 40 minutes of this interview.

This documentary is not perfect, though. Some of her complaints are not really relevant and the solutions she's suggesting seem like an afterthought (as if she put all of her effort solely in explaining the way the business works and problems it creates). Having said that, this explanation is excellent, understandable to a common man and the best part of the documentary.

If you want a quick course in big business economy, this film and Michael Moore's excellent documentary Roger & Me (1989), where he shows an example of the damage to (his) local economy that a corporation can leave once it exports its factories (and jobs) out of US, will do the job nicely.


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