7.0/10
7,848
89 user 45 critic

House of D (2004)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama | 29 April 2005 (USA)
By working through problems stemming from his past, Tom Warshaw, an American artist living in Paris, begins to discover who he really is, and returns to his home to reconcile with his family and friends.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Lady / Bernadette
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Melissa
Magali Amadei ...
Coralie Warshaw
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Simone
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Superfly
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Sasha (as Bernard Sheredy)
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Ticket Seller
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Mrs. Brevoort
Harold Cartier ...
Odell Warshaw
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Mr. Pappass

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Storyline

On their son Odell's 13the birthday, graphic artist Tom Warszaw finally confesses to his wife why he fled Greenwich Village, NYC at that age to Paris. As a schoolboy, naturally sensitive, considerate Tommy was best buddy with 'adult' half-wit Pappass, father Duncan's Catholic school's assistant janitor. Smothered by his dependent mother, a dumb orderly, Tommy got 'parental advice' from a women's prison inmate. Together with Pappas, he saves up tips from their butchery delivery rounds. One night, Pappas steals the bike they were saving for. Tommy tries to take the blame, but ends up expelled as if the instigator. Even more tragic consequences follow. Written by KGF Vissers

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You never know who your angel's gonna be. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual and drug references, thematic elements and language | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

29 April 2005 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Can dostlar  »

Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$36,371 (USA) (15 April 2005)

Gross:

$371,081 (USA) (6 May 2005)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Shia LaBeouf was originally cast as Tommy, but was replaced by Anton Yechlin due to a scheduling conflict. See more »

Goofs

As Tom and Pappas are in the cab crossing the bridge, a crewmember can be seen in the car immediately behind them waving to the other drivers to begin passing as the take begins. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Tom Warshaw: [narrating] My name is Tom Warshaw. I'm an American artist living in Paris. I've lived here for 30 years with a secret nobody knows. My son, Odell, is turning 13 today. And for his birthday, I'm gonna tell him my secret.
Tom Warshaw: I'm gonna tell him, "You know how in old movies when the bad guys want to break into a safe? There's this one guy, the safecracker, who puts his ear up to the lock and listens as he dials the combination, listening for what they call in English, the tumblers. ...
[...]
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Soundtracks

Funk # 49
Written by Jim Fox, Joe Walsh, Dale Peters
Performed by James Gang
Courtesy of MCA Records
Under License from Universal Music Enterprises
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A transporting period film with a few problems...
29 March 2005 | by (Seattle, WA - USA) – See all my reviews

Set mostly in a flashback to 1973 New York City, this is at heart not a coming of age movie but a coming to terms movie. From the opening scenes in Paris, we're set up by a voice-over narrative to expect terrible events which would change a boy's life. And, true to its word, we are delivered a series of disasters, many of which are prefigured in a short-handed kind of way. But it doesn't really matter, because you know where the film is heading, and your reaction to the last 15 minutes coming out of the flashbacks will pretty much determine whether you like this film or not. (Note that the ratings here are split pretty dramatically between very positive and very negative.) The things that are right with the film are good, sometimes very good. At the top of the "good" list is Erykah Badu's outstanding performance as a prisoner in the Women's House of Detention , an urban jail with windows over the street, who offers conversation and advice to the young protagonist. Also, the evocative period setting, which puts to shame a lot of films with many times the budget. Finally, there are a few deft touches of humor in the dialog, particularly in the early scenes of school life. The other performances are a bit more uneven. Anton Yelchin, the younger version of Duchony's character, is often winning and natural, but when real crisis hits, I didn't buy his grief and desperation. Not knowing the Robin Williams role, I cringed a bit when he first appeared on screen, but his performance is for the most part fairly restrained -- at least by Robin Williams' standards. Ducovny and wife Tea Leoni were competent but not compelling. We saw this film at a preview that featured a Q&A with Ducovny afterward. He clearly has affection for the material and, if anything, set out to make an even more modest film, budget-wise, than this. This is potentially pretty dicey plot material and could have veered severely wrong, particularly toward sloppy sentimentality. While I don't think the film entirely escaped this, it's certain a better film than, say, the dreadfully manipulative, "The Notebook". If you're not expecting too much and you can appreciate the 70's period setting, you'll probably enjoy this. If you're expecting a genius writer-director first film out of Ducovny -- you will be disappointed. Bottom line: give Ducovny some space and let's wait for his second film before delivering an real judgment on his career as writer-director.


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