Bye-Child is Bernard MacLaverty's film version of Seamus Heaney's poem of the same title. It concerns the story of a male child who is secretly kept in a henhouse at the bottom of a garden ... See full synopsis »

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Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Woman
Dick Holland ...
Father
Brian Devlin ...
Priest
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Patrick FitzSymons ...
Paddy's Father (as Patrick Fitzsymons)
Genna McCormick ...
Bye-Child
Daniel McGrady ...
Paddy
Paul Stewart ...
Chris
David Stratton ...
Frankie
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Storyline

Bye-Child is Bernard MacLaverty's film version of Seamus Heaney's poem of the same title. It concerns the story of a male child who is secretly kept in a henhouse at the bottom of a garden in a village in Ireland... See full synopsis »

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Plot Keywords:

family relationships | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama | Short | Mystery

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Details

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Release Date:

28 October 2003 (UK)  »

Box Office

Budget:

£100,000 (estimated)
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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Connections

Follows Paw (2003) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Beautiful, haunting, bleak
23 February 2005 | by (Belfast, N.I) – See all my reviews

This film starts with the sound of heavy breathing and the camera tracking backwards and forwards, keeping the bright white moon in sight. This opening sets up the key visual and aural themes of the film: heavy breathing, the inability to express oneself in articulate speech, the inadequacy of speech and then the moon - symbol of ancient pagan belief and the "miracle" of modernity, progress and science. In the midst of these philosophical motifs is a breathtakingly sad story of child abuse and sexual violence, handled with admirable restraint and sympathy. Wonderful poetic moments too - the close-up on the kettle reaching boiling point or the shock of the final revelation of the child's face. An amazing achievement by Mclaverty, and a film that speaks volumes in a very sparse, pared down, controlled use of sound and image.


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