The misadventures of a hotel's unusual staff and residents.

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Bill Jackson ...
 B.J.
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An extremely unusual and well-liked children's show starring Bill Jackson of "Clown Alley" fame. Each show was devoted to a "life lesson", like learning about responsibility, fire safety, etc. Jackson would also display his considerable artistic talents, in particular during the segment where he would go find a lump of clay named "Blob" (an actual vocal character who mostly made strange mumbling noises) and shape him into something. Written by Matlock-6

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hotel | puppet | See All (2) »

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Family

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The hotel bellhop's name is Weird. See more »

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An utterly Satanic show
17 February 2005 | by (Phoenix, AZ USA) – See all my reviews

I read this review of Gigglesnort Hotel, and wanted to share it with everyone, for I feel the same way about the show. I sued to watch this as a kid, and even though I thought it was funny, there was always something very disturbing about it. SO read this, by a gut named Alan Hines.

Gigglesnort Hotel was utterly Satanic. There was nothing cute or funny about it - it was horrifying and wrong. Eg: The Blob of Clay didn't "talk" - it continually whimpered in agony and terror as the other characters molded, manipulated and taunted it... All except for the lone human, who would sculpt, re-face and attempt commiseration with his fellow prisoner in Gigglesnort Hell. Then along would come the Dragon, who would eat some coal, let fly a litany of insults, and then spew huge amounts of smoke from his nostrils. I used to hide in the corner when it was on TV. It's one of those things that the media establishment has tried to wipe from the collective memory, kind of like Rankin & Bass's "The Year Without A Santa Claus" (also fairly Satanic) - but it was real.

  • Alan Hines


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