The Philadelphia homicide squad's lone female detective finds her calling when she's assigned "cold cases" -- older crimes that have never been solved.

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624 ( 2)

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7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
2010   2009   2008   2007   2006   2005   … See all »
Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 11 wins & 26 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
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 Lilly Rush (156 episodes, 2003-2010)
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 John Stillman (156 episodes, 2003-2010)
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 Nick Vera (156 episodes, 2003-2010)
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 Will Jeffries (156 episodes, 2003-2010)
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 Scotty Valens (151 episodes, 2003-2010)
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 Kat Miller (106 episodes, 2005-2010)

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Storyline

Lilly Rush is a Philadelphia police detective working for the department's homicide squad and being assigned 'cold cases': crimes that were committed many years before and have not been solved. Lilly must try to re-think the crime scenes and interview other people involved with the victims to find a link to solving the cases. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Better late than never. See more »


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

28 September 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Anexihniastes ypotheseis  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Danny Pino, who plays Scott Valens, also played a cop, Nick Amaro, on Law and Order: Special Victims Unit (1999). See more »

Goofs

Frequently, in various episodes, the detectives say that a gun is registered to someone (or that someone has no registered guns, or the like). There is no gun registration in Pennsylvania; it's prohibited by state law. See more »

Quotes

Scotty Valens: Who's that charmer?
Lilly Rush: A.D.A Kite, he's above cops.
Scotty Valens: Ain't above checking you out.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Cougar Town: Free Fallin' (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Nara
(Credits Music)
by E.S. Posthumus
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Spontaneous Human Confession
16 October 2011 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Whilst seen by many as a poor copy of the superb Canadian television show, Cold Squad, Cold Case is actually a lot less than that.

The team's remit appears to be to look at any unsolved murder cases - often dating back to the first half of the twentieth century - and piece together enough anecdotal evidence (as opposed to actual physical evidence, which is almost never unearthed) with which to flesh-out a story.

The one bit of detective skill they demonstrate is the uncanny ability to locate surviving participants in the often-ancient series of events.

We are then treated to a series of hazy recollections, hearsay and gossip - accompanied by a dramatised re-enactment of the alleged events

  • related fluently by the witness/suspect, with our central
protagonist, Detective Rush (a less suitable candidate for the job of police officer one could not imagine), forever appearing on the verge of tears, as she listens to them ramble on.

Naturally, several of these witnesses will have had some sort of tenuous motive to commit the crime, so each becomes a possible suspect for the intrepid Nancy Drew....er....Detective Rush.

Now, remember that there is no actual evidence linking any of these possible suspects with the crime. None whatsoever. So, how is the case solved?

The guilty party simply confesses!

How wonderfully convenient.

This leaves us with a couple of conclusions:

a] The Philadelphia Police Department must have been staffed by utter incompetents, between the early twentieth century and the first few years of the present century.

b] The present Philadelphia Police Department has a constant stream of people, often over eighty years of age, queueing-up at their door, desperate to confess to long-forgotten crimes.


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