About a family shouldering an unexpected responsibility when Alzheimer's disease strikes their grandmother. The superb cast portrays this serious and realistic situation with heart-warming ... See full summary »

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Tomoe
Kazuko Yoshiyuki ...
Masa Tommies ...
Yuzo
Asami Tano ...
Mizuho
Tokiko Katô ...
Teacher Nakano
Katsuko Kanai
Kimiko Inui
Rei Okamoto
Hiroko Nakajima
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Kazue Tsunogae
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About a family shouldering an unexpected responsibility when Alzheimer's disease strikes their grandmother. The superb cast portrays this serious and realistic situation with heart-warming compassion, stressing the importance of empathizing with the victims of this difficult disease. Written by http://www.cmoa.org/html/cinema/cinema/newfromjapan.htm

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A Nutshell Review: Oriume
22 September 2007 | by (Singapore) – See all my reviews

Movies can entertain, and they can educate, and with Oriume, it brought about a better understanding of Alzheimer's Disease in the way that it was portrayed as is without any big melodramatic moments to drag the story or cast an overly sympathetic view of patients suffering from its symptoms. I thought it managed to strike a neat balance between the victim and the true sufferers - that of the caregiver, most likely being the family members rather than healthcare professionals.

And it is this family aspect of it that Oriume shines. How often it is when you have a sick elderly person in the house, that siblings can't wait to shrug their obligation, and pass the buck around most easily to the one who is deemed has the most free time on hand? And in doing so, cook up various excuses and nary will lend any resource to assist? The same thing happens to Tomoe (Mieko Harada), whose mother in law is suffering from Alzheimer's, and their household taking on the responsibility because of insensitive and selfish relatives.

Of course it seemed like the right thing to do, since nobody wants to lend a helping hand, and her own family values mean leaving nobody behind. But mother in law Masako (veteran actress Yoshiyuki Kazuko) begins to exhibit more random symptoms from simple forgetfulness to more aggressive mood swings, and this begin to take their toil on Tomoe, worse still being her children and husband failing to understand the situation, expecting her to take it in her stride, or to throw her to a home.

Oriume is an extremely heartwarming journey from breaking point to understanding and reconciliation. Both actresses play off each other's strengths, and forged an excellent chemistry as patient-caregiver, mother-daughter-in-law, and of best friends. It brings out a reminder too that in difficult situations like these, moral support amongst family and having everyone chip in, do go a long way to keep the household sane. There shouldn't be a need to shrug responsibility or let it rest on the shoulders of an individual, as the saying goes, more hands make less work. Not to mention, plenty of patience and an arsenal of knowledge help loads too. What's even more admirable here, that we can always learn from, is that Tomoe is an in-law, not direct blood relations, but that doesn't deter her from giving nothing but the best form of care she can dish.

However the movie doesn't feel clinical at all by throwing at you all the medical terms. It demonstrates how to cope with the disease in a much subtle and common manner, weaving a poignant tale within, and I'm sure had definitely touched the audience this evening, as you can hear sniffles all round. Both Yoshiyuki Kazuko and Mieko Harada were excellent in their roles, and the movie can't possibly exude a certain warm feeling toward the end, if not for their portrayals.


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