With all his faults, Jack Martin, an Arizona gambler, has one redeeming quality, a deep love for his motherless child. The baby is taken sick. Leaving her with Aunt Jane, the Mexican ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Robert Thornby ...
Jack Martin - Gambler
Charles Bennett ...
Dr. Winton - The Sheriff Doctor
Roma Raymond ...
Eagle Eye, an Apache Squaw (as Mrs. Williams)
George Stanley
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With all his faults, Jack Martin, an Arizona gambler, has one redeeming quality, a deep love for his motherless child. The baby is taken sick. Leaving her with Aunt Jane, the Mexican housekeeper, Jack goes for Dr. Winton, who is also the sheriff. The child dies. Crazed with grief, Jack gets drunk and shoots the town marshal. Leaping astride his horse, he escapes into the desert. Far out on a sandy plain, he comes across the dead body of a young Apache squaw, who has been bitten by a rattlesnake. By the side of the lifeless form he finds a child who has nursed from its mother's breast and imbibed the poison. Jack thinks of his own child, and his heart goes out to the little one. Jack has eluded his pursuers and his horse has dropped from exhaustion. He knows that he is free to escape. He hesitates, but determines to save the little papoose by doubling back on his tracks and meeting the posse, of which the doctor-sheriff is the leader. On rounding a curve in the canyon, he comes upon ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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7 September 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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A Slow Western
12 August 2016 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

After Robert Thornby's daughter dies, he goes on a drunk and shoots a man. When he flees, he discovers a dead Indian woman and her child in this subpar Vitagraph western.

I have two sets of issues with this short film. First, it uses scene-setting titles to tell the audience what they are about to see, a story-telling technique that had been going out of fashion for ten years. Second, it loses characters in its telegraphic methods of plotting. Thornby's wife simply disappears after the child dies. At the same time, the actors take their time to do anything. This gives the audience too much time to think about these issues.

If you wish to see this western out of a sense of completeness, as I did, a good copy of it is on the Eye Institute site on YouTube.


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