6.9/10
20,934
151 user 114 critic

Mirrormask (2005)

In a fantasy world of opposing kingdoms, a 15-year old girl must find the fabled MirrorMask in order to save the kingdom and get home.

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Writers:

(story), (story) | 1 more credit »

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
5 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Helena / Anti-Helena
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Morris Campbell / Prime Minister
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Joanne Campbell / Queen of Light / Queen of Shadows
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Aunt Nan
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Librarian
Andy Hamilton ...
Small Hairy
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Sphinx
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Cops 1-4
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Gryphon
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Mrs. Bagwell
Eve Pearce ...
Future Fruit Lady
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Pingo / Bing (as Nik Robinson)
Victoria Williams ...
Nurse
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Man In a Box
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Storyline

In a fantasy world of opposing kingdoms, a 15-year-old girl named Helena who works at the family circus with her father and mother, who wishes--quite ironically--that she could run away from the circus and join 'real life'. But such is not to be the case, as she finds herself on a strange journey into the Dark Lands, a fantastic landscape filled with giants, Monkeybirds and dangerous sphinxes. She must find the fabled MirrorMask in order to save the kingdom and get back home. Written by Anthony Pereyra {hypersonic91@yahoo.com}

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

An extraordinary dream quest to rescue a world out of balance. See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Fantasy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some mild thematic elements and scary images | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

3 March 2006 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Carobna maska  »

Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$126,449 (USA) (30 September 2005)

Gross:

$864,959 (USA) (9 December 2005)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Dave McKean: the motion capture performer for the porcupine wearing braces. His character also appears waving during the end credits. See more »

Goofs

Dwarf actor Peter Burroughs is misspelled in the end credits. See more »

Quotes

Helena: I'm not anyone
[pause]
Helena: I'm... me!
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Connections

Referenced in Coraline (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Close to You
Written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David
Performed by Josefine Cronholm
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User Reviews

 
Primal and True Fantasy
14 February 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

The medium of film is--like the medium of writing or other celebrated media--practically limitless in potential for fantastic creations. However, the fantasy (NOT SCI FI) genre is severely underrepresented in it. For every Lord of the Rings, we have ten attempts at The Matrix.

But what better alchemical mix to straight-up fantasy can we have than Neil Gaiman, Dave McKean, and the Henson Company? One thing Henson could do with his puppets that many others never really aspired to do was create fantasy the likes that weren't really done again, and his legacy lives on, using the enriching and creative mind of Gaiman, the celebrated British fantasy writer and comic book artist whose vivid imagination was so perfectly translated into film using practically every chemical for fantasy possible: CGI, animation, painting, set design, split-screen, superimposition, saturated colors, I even think there were moments of stop-motion animation.

The story is about a fifteen-year-old girl named Helena who works for a circus. Her creative and artistic mind keeps her busy from day to day until her mother falls ill and has to go to the hospital. Blaming it on herself for a row she had with her mother, Helena "escapes" into dreamland... or does she? I think what's really refreshing about this film is that, despite what a lot of people say about it, it's NOT that much like Alice and Wonderland. I can't help but think that, despite the fact that this film uses a lot of tropes common to the fantasy genre, it's distinct and original, something to be admired and appreciated. I don't think anything in this film really came off as that clichéd, even though it did come across as familiar. It might even be possible to say that anybody who has a real problem with it is just taking it too seriously, but that argument always goes in the wrong direction so forget about it.

One of the things I think that's important about a film like this is that it's not really a kids movie. Children could watch it, easily, and be fine with it, but it's not directed just to them. It isn't really directed at a target audience in the genre sense. It is simply fantasy for fantasy's sake, going where a lot of filmmakers seem desperate to avoid because "It's just not real enough." That's why, despite the fact that this movie has pretty obvious CGI, it doesn't matter as much as the obvious CGI in The Hulk: it's so fantastic, it helps that it doesn't seem real.

Too bad it just won't get the marketing or the attention it deserves, probably ever. That's why if it's ever considered a classic at all, it'll be a cult classic. Such seems the destination of many things that dare to be what they want and not what others want them to be.

--PolarisDiB


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