Happy Feet
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 50 items from 2006   « Prev | Next »


'Pirates' helps push '06 boxoffice tally up 5%

29 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Boxoffice slump? What boxoffice slump?

The theatrical boxoffice might be under siege, but it fought back and actually gained some ground in 2006. As the boxoffice year, which will conclude with the New Year's holiday weekend, winds to an end, the total national tally is headed toward an estimated $9.42 billion, which would represent an increase of nearly 5% compared with 2005's $8.99 billion.

Certainly, records were set along the way: The biggest cheers surrounded the record-breaking opening of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, which set both an opening-day and single-day record of $55.8 million when it bowed July 7, supplanting the mark established a little more than a year earlier, when Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith, debuted to $50 million on May 19, 2005.

Dead Man's Chest's opening weekend of $135.6 million also supplanted Spider-Man's $114.8 million record set in 2002. It also took just two days for Dead Man's Chest to pass the $100 million mark, another first.

That helped set the tone for what proved to be a much more hopeful year -- at points during the summer, the year-to-date boxoffice was running as high as 6%-7% above the comparable 2005 figures.

Some of those increases declined in the final months. Although Hollywood opened a number of holiday offerings that turned into hits, none was as big as 2005's crop of year-end blockbusters. This year's biggest November/December release is Happy Feet, with more than $165 million to date. By comparison, November 2005 unleashed Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, which conjured up $276.9 million by the end of that year.

In point of fact, despite a few statistical upticks, the overall boxoffice picture for 2006 did not change dramatically from 2005. If the Cassandras decrying the end of the theatrical business last year were overly alarmist, the Candides proclaiming that this year represented the best of all possible worlds were just as overly optimistic.

Throughout much of 2005, Hollywood fretted and the media raised alarms as national boxoffice grosses declined nearly 6% from the previous record-breaking year. Industry executives and outside observers began assembling a lineup of possible suspects: Increasing competition from DVD sales as the window between theatrical openings and DVD releases narrowed; dissatisfaction with higher ticket prices, expensive concessions and unruly audiences; competition from such rival platforms as video games and music downloads for the minds and disposable income of the ever-more-elusive under-25 males. An endemic change in viewing habits seemed to be taking place.

Nonsense, insisted the skeptics, who argued that the big problem in 2005 was simply too many bad movies. Make better movies, and the audiences will come back.

Last year was branded the Year of the Slump, when it suffered through a record 19 consecutive weekends during the first half in which boxoffice grosses fell below the numbers set during the comparable frames in 2004. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Happy Feet' dances to $10 mil for Imax

22 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- Imax Corp. said Wednesday that a supersize version of Warner Bros. Pictures' Happy Feet had surpassed the $10 million boxoffice mark in its giant theaters.

Imax said Happy Feet: The Imax Experience had grossed $10.6 million to date since its Nov. 17 bow on about 79 domestic Imax screens.

The large-format launch for Happy Feet in November produced the highest-grossing first and second weekends ever for a digitally remastered Hollywood movie in Imax theaters. Happy Feet, has been a rare bright spot for the beleaguered Imax.

Imax shares traded up 1.7% on Wednesday to $3.66 and remain 67% off their 52-week high.

Imax has taken a series of hits in recent months, including last week's announcement that it was off of the auction block after failing since March to find a buyer willing to meet an unspecified price tag.

Imax plans to roll out Happy Feet, which has so far grossed about $200 million in total boxoffice worldwide, on 28 international large-format screens, including ones in Buenos Aires, Argentina and throughout Mexico. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Queen tops of 2006 T.O critic's list

20 December 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- The Toronto Film Critics Association were faithful to the commonwealth - voting The Queen as the top feature, best screenplay, actress and best supporting actor. Canadian doc Manufactured Landscapes picked up best Canadian film and best documentary. Here are the year’s best list: Best Picture The Queen Best Director (tie): Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne - L'enfant (The Child), Stephen Frears - The Queen Best Actor: Sacha Baron Cohen -Borat Best Actress: Helen Mirren - The Queen Best Supporting Actor: Michael Sheen - The Queen Best Supporting Actress: Cate Blanchett - Notes on a Scandal Best Screenplay: The Queen - Peter Morgan Best Foreign Language Film: L'enfant (The Child) , Belgium Best Animated Film: Happy Feet Best Canadian Film: Manufactured Landscapes Best Documentary: Manufactured Landscapes Best First Film: Jason Reitman - Thank You For Smoking »

Permalink | Report a problem


Toronto critics anoint 'Queen' best picture

20 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- The Toronto Film Critics Assn. on Tuesday chose Stephen Frears' The Queen as the best picture of 2006.

The royal drama dominated the voting, with Helen Mirren earning best actress for her portrayal of a frosty Queen Elizabeth II facing the emotionally charged death of Princess Diana, Michael Sheen winning best supporting actor for his performance as British Prime Minister Tony Blair, and Peter Morgan taking the screenplay award.

Frears split the best director nod with Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne for their Belgian drama L'Enfant, winner of the Palme D'or at the year's Festival de Cannes.

The other multiple winner this year was Canadian filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal, who picked up the best documentary feature and best Canadian film citations for Manufactured Landscapes, a film shot in China about the world and work of Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky.

Other TFCA awards saw Sacha Baron Cohen winning best actor for his star turn in Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan, and Cate Blanchett earning best supporting actress honors for Notes On a Scandal.

Jason Reitman's Thank You For Smoking was the critics' pick for best first feature, while George Miller's Happy Feet earned top honors in the animated feature category. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Toronto critics anoint 'Queen' best picture

20 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- The Toronto Film Critics Assn. on Tuesday chose Stephen Frears' The Queen as the best picture of 2006.

The royal drama dominated the voting, with Helen Mirren earning best actress for her portrayal of a frosty Queen Elizabeth II facing the emotionally charged death of Princess Diana, Michael Sheen winning best supporting actor for his performance as British Prime Minister Tony Blair, and Peter Morgan taking the screenplay award.

Frears split the best director nod with Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne for their Belgian drama L'Enfant, winner of the Palme D'or at the year's Festival de Cannes.

The other multiple winner this year was Canadian filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal, who picked up the best documentary feature and best Canadian film citations for Manufactured Landscapes, a film shot in China about the world and work of Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky.

Other TFCA awards saw Sacha Baron Cohen winning best actor for his star turn in Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan, and Cate Blanchett earning best supporting actress honors for Notes On a Scandal.

Jason Reitman's Thank You For Smoking was the critics' pick for best first feature, while George Miller's Happy Feet earned top honors in the animated feature category. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Queen' anointed in Toronto

20 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- The Toronto Film Critics Assn. on Tuesday chose Stephen Frears' The Queen as the best picture of 2006.

The royal drama dominated the voting, with Helen Mirren earning best actress for her portrayal of a frosty Queen Elizabeth II facing the emotionally charged death of Princess Diana, Michael Sheen winning best supporting actor for his performance as British Prime Minister Tony Blair, and Peter Morgan taking the screenplay award.

Frears split the best director nod with Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne for their Belgian drama L'Enfant, winner of the Palme D'or at the year's Festival de Cannes.

The other multiple winner this year was Canadian filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal, who picked up the best documentary feature and best Canadian film citations for Manufactured Landscapes, a film shot in China about the world and work of Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky.

Other TFCA awards saw Sacha Baron Cohen winning best actor for his star turn in Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan, and Cate Blanchett earning best supporting actress honors for Notes On a Scandal.

Jason Reitman's Thank You For Smoking was the critics' pick for best first feature, while George Miller's Happy Feet earned top honors in the animated feature category. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Dallas critics opt for 'United 93'

18 December 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- The Dallas film critics spread their best of 06' picks this year - Scorsese walks off with Best Director, but Paul Greengrass' United 93 is tops with Best Picture. Here are the selected winners from the Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Assn. Best Film: United 93 Top 10 include: The Departed Little Miss Sunshine The Queen Babel Letters From Iwo Jima Dreamgirls Blood Diamond Little Children Flags of Our Fathers Best Director: Martin Scorsese - The Departed Best Actor: Forest Whitaker - The Last King of Scotland Best Actress: Helen Mirren - The Queen Best Supporting Actor: Jackie Earle Haley - Little Children Best Supporting Actress: Cate Blanchett - Notes on a Scandal Best Foreign Language film: Letters From Iwo Jima Best Documentary Film: An Inconvenient Truth Best Animated film: Happy Feet Best Screenplay: Michael Arndt - Little Miss Sunshine Best Cinematography: Dean Semler - Apocalypto »

Permalink | Report a problem


N.Y. critics hail 'United 93,' 'Queen'

14 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers. »

Permalink | Report a problem


It's Bond again in busy market

13 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Amid a wild scramble for dates to gain a foothold for a year-end holiday run, the 21st entry of the James Bond franchise, Casino Royale, dominated the overseas market for a fourth straight weekend, commanding $35.6 million from 7,700 screens in 69 territories to reach an international gross of $246.6 million.

The spy thriller emerged on top in the face of a barrage of family films, a new romantic comedy and a brace of action-adventure films as the major studios vigorously vie for a piece of the business at the most crowded time of the year. The summer season, which now covers April to September, and the year-end November-December span account for roughly 60% of the overseas boxoffice take, according to studio executives.

This past weekend and the year-end expectations suggest the direction of the offshore boxoffice flow this year. Some experts predict that a new record may be in the making. At this point, four companies -- 20th Century Fox International, Buena Vista International (Disney), Sony Pictures Releasing International and Warner Bros. Pictures International -- have each exceeded $1 billion in gross revenue from the international market. At the same time, Sony, Disney and Fox have each topped $3 billion in worldwide boxoffice revenue.

This past weekend's boxoffice activities support the anticipated Christmas-New Year jam-up as thousands of prints worked furiously around the globe, especially in Europe. In addition, a lot more will be joining the fray this coming weekend as Fox's Eragon, a family fantasy about a dragon, hits the overseas market day-and-date with North America in some 76 markets, including key outlets like the U.K., Germany, France and Japan.

Warner Bros. Pictures' dancing-penguins film Happy Feet led the weekend's animation charge, stepping out with $29.9 million from some 6,000 prints in 37 markets, taking the No. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Broadcast Film Critics Association noms

12 December 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Promoting themselves as a barometer for Oscar predictions – this pretty much group all the favorites and safe picks. Leading the pack are “Babel," "The Departed," "Dreamgirls" and "Little Miss Sunshine" each with seven nominations each. Now its in 12th year, the Critics Choice Award is voted on by film critics from almost 200 television, radio and online critics. The 12th annual Critics’ Choice Awards ceremony will be held on Friday, January 12, 2007, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. Best Picture Babel Blood Diamond The Departed Dreamgirls Letters From Iwo Jima Little Children Little Miss Sunshine Notes on a Scandal The Queen United 93 Best Actor Leonardo DiCaprio - Blood Diamond Leonardo DiCaprio - The Departed Ryan Gosling - Half Nelson Peter O'Toole - Venus Will Smith - The Pursuit of Happyness Forest Whitaker - The Last King of Scotland Best Actress Penelope Cruz - Volver Judi Dench - Notes »

Permalink | Report a problem


'United 93,' Whitaker, Mirren, Scorsese get N.Y. critics' nod

12 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers. »

Permalink | Report a problem


AFI features choices for top 10 films

12 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Selecting an eclectic list of films -- ranging from the confrontational comedy of Borat to the animated dance moves of Happy Feet to more serious fare like Babel and Letters From Iwo Jima -- the American Film Institute announced its choices for its AFI Awards 2006 on Sunday.

The 10 films selected as the most outstanding American motion pictures of the year include three comedies, Borat, The Devil Wears Prada and Little Miss Sunshine; one live-action musical, Dreamgirls; one animated musical, Happy Feet; one thriller, Inside Man; one docudrama, United 93; and three dramas, Babel, Half Nelson and Letters from Iwo Jima.

On the TV side, the 10 outstanding TV programs of the year are Battlestar Galactica, Dexter, Elizabeth I, Friday Night Lights, Heroes, The Office, South Park, 24, The West Wing and The Wire.

The AFI Awards, in their seventh year, recognize the creative ensembles, both in front of and behind the camera, for the film and TV titles chosen. They will be honored at a luncheon sponsored by Hewlett-Packard on Jan.12 at The Four Seasons Hotel in Los Angeles. HP has also created 20 scholarships to the AFI Conservatory, one for each of the AFI honorees. »

Permalink | Report a problem


N.Y. critics hail 'United 93,' 'Queen'

12 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'The Last King' & 'The Queen' Reign at Washington Awards

12 December 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Forest Whitaker's portrayal of dictator Idi Amin in The Last King Of Scotland and Dame Helen Mirren's turn as The Queen have earned the two stars top honors from the fifth annual Washington, DC Area Film Critics Association (WAFCA). The US capital's top critics have also named 9/11 drama United 93 as the Best Film at their fifth annual awards. And Martin Scorsese has been honored with the Best Director prize for his hit film The Departed. The Washington critics also honored Dreamgirls star Jennifer Hudson (Best Supporting Actress and Breakthrough Performance of the Year) and Blood Diamond's Djimon Hounsou (Best Supporting Actor). Happy Feet claimed the critics' Animated Feature prize and Pan's Labyrinth was named Best Foreign Language Film. »

Permalink | Report a problem


L.A. Film Critics Ass. Winners

11 December 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Quick Links  Letters From Iwo JimaThe Queen  Children of Men The Los Angeles Critics Association picked their winners for 2006, and like the previously announced picks by the National Board of Review, it appears that this yearâ€.s clear fav is Letters From Iwo Jima. Also amongst the populist vote was The Queen â€. it picked up a no brainer best actress win for Helen Mirren, but also gave best supporting actor to Michael Sheen who did a great job at playing Tony Blair and a best screenplay for Peter Morgan â€. who manages to captivate the audiencesâ€. attention from first act to last fade out. Some other worthy mentions that may not be the consensus with other associations are the nods to the production value for the upcoming Children of Men and a big cred goes to L.A Critics for having the balls to pick Sacha Baron Cohen »

Permalink | Report a problem


New York Film Critics Circle Winners

11 December 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Quick Links  United 93The Queen  Army of Shadows After half a weekâ€.s worth of film critic circles awards, looks like Helen Mirren and Forest Whitaker are shoe-ins for some major silverware (including the Oscars), and George Millerâ€.s Happy Feet is looking to be the consensus top animated pic, but where it is getting interesting is in the best feature film category. United 93 was selected as the top pic of the year by the New York Film Critics Circle - an organization of film reviewers from New York-based publications that exists since 1935. Pointing to the more interesting choices - Todd Fieldâ€.s Little Children finally gets some sort of nod, this time for the brave performance given by Jackie Earle Haley for best supporting actor. Pan's Labyrinth got the nod for best cinematography (look for this and Children of Men to battle each other in this »

Permalink | Report a problem


AFI features choices for top 10 films

11 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Selecting an eclectic list of films -- ranging from the confrontaional comedy of Borat to the animated dance moves of Happy Feet to more serious fare like Babel and Letters From Iwo Jima -- the American Film Institute announced its choices for its AFI Awards 2006 on Sunday.

The 10 films selected as the most outstanding American motion pictures of the year include three comedies, Borat, The Devil Wears Prada and Little Miss Sunshine; one live-action musical, Dreamgirls; one animated musical, Happy Feet; one thriller, Inside Man; one docudrama, United 93; and three dramas, Babel, Half Nelson and Letters from Iwo Jima.

On the TV side, the 10 outstanding TV programs of the year are Battlestar Galactica, Dexter, Elizabeth I, Friday Night Lights, Heroes, The Office, South Park, "24," The West Wing and The Wire.

The AFI Awards, in their seventh year, recognize the creative ensembles, both in front of and behind the camera, for the film and TV titles chosen. They will be honored at a luncheon sponsored by Hewlett-Packard on Jan.12 at The Four Seasons Hotel in Los Angeles. HP has also created 20 scholarships to the AFI Conservatory, one for each of the AFI honorees. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Apocalypto' clips 'Holiday' on Friday

11 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Mel Gibson's bloody-minded Apocalypto carved out a small victory at the boxoffice Friday as it edged ahead of Nancy Meyer's love potion The Holiday.

According to the boxoffice tracking site boxofficemojo.com, Buena Vista's R-rated Apocalypto, even without benefit of stars, took first place for the day with an estimated $4.95 million.

In second place, Sony Pictures' PG-13 rated Holiday, which boasts the starring quartet of Cameron Diaz, Jude Law, Kate Winslet and Jack Black, attracted an estimated $4.4 million, which could still allow it to take the entire weekend if it enjoys a strong Saturday.

Even though it features Leonardo DiCaprio as an African adventurer, Warner Bros. Pictures' Blood Diamond, directed by Edward Zwick, fell behind the marketplace leaders, debuting in fourth place with an estimated $2.68 million.

The weekend's other new wide release, Warners' comedy Unaccompanied Minors, which is aimed at kids, had to settle for a seventh-place bow with an estimated $1.6 million.

Meanwhile, both Happy Feet and Casino Royale, both entering their fourth weekend, continued to hang in.

The animated Happy Feet stood in third place with an estimated $3.1 million, while the action-packed Casino Royale grabbed the fifth spot with an estimated $2.6 million.

BACKGROUND

Boxoffice preview: Mayans, miners in culture clash

Published Dec. 8

By Nicole Sperling

It's likely to be a photo finish at the boxoffice this weekend when three wide releases targeting adults -- Warner Bros. Pictures' Blood Diamond, Buena Vista Pictures' Apocalypto and Sony Pictures' The Holiday -- are sent out into the marketplace.

?All are looking to lure a very busy preholiday audience this frame. Warners will up the ante by unveiling a second wide release, the family-oriented Unaccompanied Minors, which the studio hopes will be a holiday success in the vein of 20th Century Fox's 1990 hit Home Alone.

Warners unveils its Oscar hopeful Diamond in 1,910 theaters. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'United 93,' Whitaker, Mirren, Scorsese get N.Y. critics' nod

11 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and another fact-based feature, The Queen, Paul Greengrass' 9/11 drama was named best film at the New York Film Critics Circle awards after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards--two--including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

"'United 93' was really a dark horse," said Fine. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year." The chairman said its best film tie runoff with Queen was the first he'd experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said this year's other big 9/11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't really a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film Fine said ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won best nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won best animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won best foreign language film. Shadows was made in 1969 but never released domestically until this year. Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu also had a lot of support, according to Fine.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the best supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won best supporting actor for his portrayal of a pedophile in Todd Field's Little Children.

Guillermo Navarro won the best cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrynth, which was also a top contender for best film and other awards, according to Fine. »

Permalink | Report a problem


It's Bond again in busy market

11 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Amid a wild scramble for dates to gain a foothold for a year-end holiday run, the 21st entry of the James Bond franchise, Casino Royale, dominated the overseas market for a fourth straight weekend, commanding $35.6 million from 7,700 screens in 69 territories to reach an international gross of $246.6 million.

The spy thriller emerged on top in the face of a barrage of family films, a new romantic comedy and a brace of action-adventure films as the major studios vigorously vie for a piece of the business at the most crowded time of the year. The summer season, which now covers April to September, and the year-end November-December span account for roughly 60% of the overseas boxoffice take, according to studio executives.

This past weekend and the year-end expectations suggest the direction of the offshore boxoffice flow this year. Some experts predict that a new record may be in the making. At this point, four companies -- 20th Century Fox International, Buena Vista International (Disney), Sony Pictures Releasing International and Warner Bros. Pictures International -- have each exceeded $1 billion in gross revenue from the international market. At the same time, Sony, Disney and Fox have each topped $3 billion in worldwide boxoffice revenue.

This past weekend's boxoffice activities support the anticipated Christmas-New Year jam-up as thousands of prints worked furiously around the globe, especially in Europe. In addition, a lot more will be joining the fray this coming weekend as Fox's Eragon, a family fantasy about a dragon, hits the overseas market day-and-date with North America in some 76 markets, including key outlets like the U.K., Germany, France and Japan.

Warner Bros. Pictures' dancing-penguins film Happy Feet led the weekend's animation charge, stepping out with $29.9 million from some 6,000 prints in 37 markets, taking the No. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 50 items from 2006   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners