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Chakushin ari
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Reviews & Ratings for
One Missed Call More at IMDbPro »Chakushin ari (original title)

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Index 71 reviews in total 

75 out of 101 people found the following review useful:

a very great "grudge" movie for Asian horror fans

10/10
Author: gizoune7 from Canada
5 December 2004

i read a lot of bad reviews about this fantastic movie, so i watched it without even expecting something good.Of course i was positively surprised,the actors are very good : very few American actress knows how to express pure terror on they're faces as well as a Japanese actress.Miike success in creating an intense and creepy mood that follows you all the way till the end credits.

o.k. so the story is not very original,if you have seen Ju-on, Ringu or Dark water there is nothing new here. it's another Japanese movie with a "grudge" (grudge: curse that happens when someone "most of the times a girl" dies in a tragic or horrible death,then the girl return from the dead to kill,usually grudges have long dark hair covering they're faces) but the ghost or grudge in "one missed call" is a lot more scary than Sadako in ringu or even the one in ju-on and there is a lot of murders going on from the beginning to the end. It's definitely not slow paced like dark water and a lot more entertaining.

But if your like me, when you watch a zombie movie you expect zombies,if you watch a killer movie you expect killings so if you watch a Japanese horror movie expect a grudge cause it's a part of the Japanese mythology so don't go crying out loud that this movie sucks because it's a pale imitation of ringu and ju-on, IT IS NOT!!!!

so, i give this movie 10/10 for three reason: 1: a lot of good scares 2: a very effective and disgusting grudge 3: entertaining from opening credits to the end

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40 out of 54 people found the following review useful:

A fun ride into Miike's more commercial world

Author: melvin-18 from Tokyo, Japan
19 March 2004

It is hard to do something new in the world of horror these days. Even Japanese horrors which were deemed fresh in the late 90's got more and more repetitive, and we can say that after Kairo, there is nothing really fresh coming out of the horror department of Japanese films. The quiet atmosphere and the fear towards darkness within colorless world possessed by vicious female ghosts is no longer new to both Japan and the rest of the world. Ju-ons (all of them except the part 2 of the one made only for video which sucked badly) are scary; the series break the silent rule of Japanese horrors, its director even say that he tried to go the opposite way Nakata and Kurosawa went, he will scare the audience by showing the ghosts and gore as much as possible. And Ju-ons worked, to some extent; the director is successful in creating the world of nightmare that co-exist with the ordinary world that people live in. He use a normal house/apartment as his stage of fear and bring out all the every possible scare out of every corner of that place. But one can also say that Ju-ons are good only in parts; its strength is just the sum of a few very scary scenes that the director successfully created and not the overall atmosphere or the story of the films. Now it's time for the ever creative Miike who once scared the hell out of the audience, not by using ghosts, but using a sadistic but innocent-looking girl, to put some new blood into Japanese horrors. As a big fan of J-horror and Miike, I was so looking forward to the film and that I was afraid my high expectation will kill it, but the result was beyond my expectation, I enjoyed this thrill ride so much I wish it would never end.

In terms of story, Chakushin Ari is nothing new. It's the Ring plus mobile phone plus Miike trademark's world of weirdness. However, it's execution is a very good blend of Nakata's the silent and dark world and Simizu's bang bang ghost is coming style, and the result, IMHO, is very fresh and satisfying. Miike has toned down his weird and over-the-top scenes to suit the taste of wider audiences, but this film is still full of creative and scary scenes (the scene at the TV station which I deem so good it's classic, and the scene at the hospital which is so weird and spooky that I wish it could last longer) with quite satisfying story and (many may argue) acceptable open ending. Although his ingredients are nonetheless recycle of old tricks (everything from dark corners, female ghosts, old apartments, old hospitals, scary-as-hell sound effects, and right out of the screen gore and ghosts), they are orchestrated in such a stylish and enjoyable way that I can't help jumping and flinching while at the same time enjoying the ever rushing adrenalin in my vein. Repetitive, may be, but fresh ideas are still everywhere; Miike stood very good balance between Nakata's atmospheric scare/strong story and Shimizu illogically outrageous and bizarre world. In sum, a very very entertaining grade A pure horror (not psychological thriller in disguise) which is both repetitive and fresh at the same time. This film should satisfied both hardcore horror fans and those who want satisfying entertainment.

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28 out of 34 people found the following review useful:

A well made horror, courtesy of Miike Takashi.

8/10
Author: Akira-36 from New Zealand
11 July 2005

Most Japanese movies are considered as low-budget compared to their Hollywood counterparts. This is because their production costs are so high. However this factor does not deter Japanese creative production teams to come up with movie gems, in different genres.

In the realm of Japanese horrors for example, a studio working with a limited budget has to resort to Jaws-style direction, in which you hardly see or visualise the ghosts/monsters.

And it is through the movie's simplicity, or by not showing/explaining too much, that J-horrors have turned up the notch on the haunting and horror levels through movies such as Ring and Dark Water. Of course there are the still plenty of gorefest movies such as Suicide Circles and Ichi the Killer, the latter being a courtesy of that notorious but prolific J-director, Takashi Miike.

So it is remarkable and truly rewarding to see how Miike toned down his tastes for the twisted and perverted in One Missed Call. Furthermore he implemented his flair of storytelling through symbolisms and graphic metaphors quite nicely. Any shock/gore elements were used in such a way that they serve the movie, instead of downgrading it to a cheesy flick.

In conclusion, One Missed Call satisfies on many levels, providing you keep an open mind and just enjoy the ride. Another plus of the movie is the appearances of several gorgeous J-idols, such as Kazue Fukishii and Kou Shibasaki. Nifty!

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20 out of 27 people found the following review useful:

Good Japanese horror movie

7/10
Author: barteknl from The Hague
13 October 2004

A good Japanese-surprise.

Was looking for something different to watch in Americanized Netherlands, and found this movie. If you have never seen any of the recent Japanese fear movies, then this one is a good compilation of the others (Ring, Dark Water, Kairo...) : strange camera angles, blurry pictures, good sound effects and music and a nice-and-somewhat logical script. I was worried about the Miike's touch, but in fact it was a surprising plus for this kind of movie, where ghosts and gore combine well. Takashi shows he knows a lot about filming methods, and also gives us an overview of the Japanese craziness about mobile phones : I can assure you that you will never look again the same way at your phone after seeing such a movie.

For the ones who have seen other Japanese horror movies, I would advise it as well, as you enjoy seeing again the same old tricks in a different context...and it works again !

So if you have the chance to have this one in a nearby theater...just try it !!

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23 out of 34 people found the following review useful:

"Hello, it's you here. You'll die in a couple of days. You are me... and I'll be dead in just a few seconds"

9/10
Author: (Vomitron_G) from the Doomed Megalopolis of Blasphemous Technoids
14 December 2006

Well, what can I say? Takashi Miike's take on the whole so-called J-horror hoopla. I bet he was thinking "I can do this too. And I can do it better". And you know what? He was right! RINGU can be considered as the original one that started it all (because of being the first big hit in the genre, for one thing). I'm not even gonna argue about whether it's the best J-horror movie or not. But I am gonna say that ONE MISSED CALL is without a doubt, on some levels, more effective than RINGU. Where Sadako's ghostly tale of terror was sort of touching the boundaries and establishing some clearly defined characteristics of the genre, CHAKUSHIN ARI pushes the boundaries and uses these characteristics as a reference to the genre.

Miike handles a very tight script and a plot that has virtually no holes and a lot of eye for details. Almost every little aspect that is being mentioned in the plot, carries a little set-up within that delivers a pay-off later. The story is intriguing. The death scenes are original and rather graphic. The ghostly creepiness is there. Every jump-scare works (there was one were I almost went through the roof! I recommend watching this with the sound turned up a notch; just let it blast out of the speakers, and I guarantee you: you will jump!). The conclusion is great and practically unpredictable; the twists were damn good. And then there's Miike, who just once again had to give this movie that Miike-touch of his, making it all just one bit more special in a way. And this time, surprisingly, he doesn't do it in the usual way. Not be inserting a sickening scene, or adding some repulsive imagery (though some events and effects really are quite gruesome). No. This time he does it by taking the movie to a different level, by adding that very last scene. And the very last shot should normally have you thinking about something that someone in a very brief scene said, earlier in the movie. The effect it had on me was: wanting to re-watch the movie. Now that's just great if a movie manages to do that. So maybe I should really rate this one 10/10. But I'll reserve that rating for THE AUDITION, my favorite Takashi Miike film ever (for now, at least).

And, by the way: I'm ready for the re-make. It's gonna be directed by Frenchman Eric Valette, who previously directed the magnificent, claustrophobic & Lovecraftian-like MALÉFIQUE. For once, I just might have a little faith in an upcoming re-make.

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16 out of 22 people found the following review useful:

Chakushin ari is another ghost tale but it gets a bit special when Miike-san is in charge of things.

7/10
Author: scobbah (scobbah@gmail.com) from Örebro, Sweden
17 March 2006

First, I strongly disagree with some other posters at the board who weren't bothered by Chakushin ari facing a Hollywood remake. Why can't Hollywood keep their dirty fingers away when they fail in their own miserable creativity. Anyhow...

I've just started to dig deeper into the works of Takashi Miike and I have no problems admitting that his movies are awesome. Chakushin ari is another ghost tale but it gets a bit special when Miike-san is in charge of things. What you get in Chakushin ari is, besides the beautiful surroundings and awesome camera work, tension, thrills and a plot which does quite good for being in this genre. It has its moments of originality and compared to the works of Hideo Nakata, I'd say Miike here accomplish a heavier load of tension throughout the whole movie, while Nakata's movies have tension coming in waves, sort of.

I have really nothing to whine about here or rant at. The actors are doing a good job and the piece kept me interested throughout the entire playtime. Thumbs up.

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17 out of 24 people found the following review useful:

Miike's best since Ichi the Killer.

9/10
Author: Delly (mortanse@yahoo.com) from Los Angeles
17 May 2005

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I've noticed that B-grade horror directors always try to scare us with otherworldly visitors, plate-throwing spooks, etc. but, as Kubrick wondered, why be afraid of ghosts? It's proof of life beyond death! This is why A-grade directors like Kubrick, Dreyer, Miike, Hitchcock, and Shymalan, realize that the true horror is existence itself, incomprehensible in its mortality, its suffering, its hopelessness. We all die; therefore, WE are the ghosts. It's the same kind of reversal you see in that Casper short where he meets a living human child and screams, the same way the boy screamed upon seeing him.

In One Missed Call, Miike quietly confesses to a deep, profound spirituality that was only apparent beforehand in his obvious contempt for everything and everyone who lacks Buddhist poise ( and the only character who even had that was Grandpa in Happiness of the Katakuris: "Yeah!" ) The movie is split into two parts. The first is a parodistic one involving lots of cell phones and tropes from The Ring, Ju-On, and other recent J-horror movies. I admit this phenomenon never made any sense to me, it was just visual noise based on memories of Poltergeist and Japanese folk tales. But Miike, who makes movies the way other people write 800-page books of philosophy, converts pop-culture dross into Renaissance-art gold, drawing out and savoring the connection, only hinted at in The Ring, between the way technology gives us the illusion of having superhuman capabilities ( talk to anyone on earth, at any time of the day! send them a video of yourself doing jumping jacks naked! ) but fails outright to protect us from the inevitable: death. You know that dread you feel when your Internet connection breaks down and you're "cut off from the world"? Miike exploits this modern fear to the limit in the greatest horror scene since the one in the shower, or 9-11 itself -- I'm talking about the very public death of Natsumi Konishi.

The second half of the movie tracks the heroine as she tries to locate the source of the malevolent phone calls who are picking off her friends left and right, hoping to escape the same fate. Her journey eventually takes her to a disused hospital, where the film's second great scene takes place, as death reaches out to life, as the departed try to close the gap between them and us. Those expecting to be "scared" won't be; others who know how to watch films without expectations, and may have seen Ordet or Vampyr, will find this scene to be curiously sorrowful and moving unlike anything they've seen before. The movie would have been a classic if it had ended here, but Miike, as he always does, spins out his concept to dizzying, unimaginable lengths, as the movie begins to concentrate more on its hero, Hiroshi, who seems to embody a very Christian kind of ethos: "When knighthood was in flower" and all of that, like Orlando Bloom in Kingdom of Heaven. I won't spoil the ending, but as he discovers, the "ghost" turns out to be a variant of Ichi, from Ichi the Killer, a destructive innocent, and it's the hero's sympathy, his capacity for loving the unlovable, that not only saves his life but wins him eternal love and eternal childhood -- the symbol for which is the candy that he rolls about in his mouth in the final shot.

No point in complaining that One Missed Call is too mainstream. Like so many other crossover movies, from Gangs of New York to Lovers on the Bridge, future generations will discover that genuine subversion resides in the collision between mainstream values and the truth; in fact, that collision IS the truth: Independent purity duking it out with the world, rather than sitting in its iron lung, all spotless and lily-white. Who wants to see a movie where the director rigs his own little belief system, his own critics, his own executioners? Every indie director, if he wants to be a great director, needs to make a large-budget film, needs to expose himself to the incomprehension and disappointment of critics, who are, though it's not often said, more of a threat to progress than the masses. Miike must find their disappointment, like that of the sadistic fanboys, proof that his quest is a true one.

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11 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

A stylish addition to Miike's portfolio

Author: DVD_Connoisseur from England
31 December 2006

After "Audition" and "Ichi The Killer", I had great expectations for this movie. What it delivers is essentially the "greatest hits" of Asian horror. There's more than a passing resemblance to "The Ring", with bits of "Ju-On" and other films thrown in for good measure.

The film revolves around mobile 'phones. A girl has a message left on her mobile 'phone answering service - only it's been left by herself and in the future! To make matters worse, it ends with a blood curdling scream! Well, it soon turns out that the message is the girl's final words on this mortal coil.

The girl is not alone. It's only a matter of time before the body count starts rising and a race against time begins to solve the mystery of the bizarre calls.

Despite being more than a shade Ringu-clone-esquire, I heartily enjoyed this film. It has some great set-pieces (including a memorable death), some spooky moments, a few "jump" sequences, etc. What the film didn't deliver, though, was any real fear. It was a case of "seen it all before" (a criticism that some levelled at "Ju-On").

The plot unravels in a logical manner and there's a decent pay off. It may not be a future classic, but this is a very well made example of Asian horror cinema.

My rating: 8 out of 10 for a stylish addition to Miike's portfolio

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13 out of 20 people found the following review useful:

The Call from Death

6/10
Author: Claudio Carvalho from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
23 August 2008

While in a bar with her friends, the teenager Yoko Okazaki (Anna Nagata) receives a call in her cellular with a voice mail from the future telling the date and time when she would die. On the next day, Yumi overhears a group of students talking about the urban legend that people connected in the address book of cellular are mysteriously receiving phone calls with date and time of their death in the near future. In the precise informed hour, Yoko is attacked by a supernatural force in a train station while talking to her friend Yumi Nakamura (Kou Shibasaki) by phone and dies with severed arm and leg. Yumi seeks out Kioto's boyfriend Kenji Kawai (Atsushi Ida), who also received a call, and witnesses his death in an elevator shaft. When her roommate Natsumi Konishi (Kazue Fukiishi) receives a call, Yoko befriends Hiroshi Yamashita (Shin'ichi Tsutsumi), who tells her that his sister Ritsuko (Azusa) that worked in the Child Guidance Center with abused children was the first victim of the phone call. While in the hospital, Yumi hears an asthma pump and recalls that she heard the same noise when Kenji died. They decide to investigate victims of asthma in the hospital and find the name of Marie Mizunuma and her daughters Mimiko and Nanako. They search the family together trying to save Natsumi from her fate.

"Chakushin Ari" is scary like most of the Asian horror movies, and has a promising beginning supported by a great acting and a good plot. However, the last quarter of the movie is confused, not clear, needing interpretation; therefore, the screenplay writer Minako Daira or the cult director Takashi Miike or both failed since they were not able to transmit a clear conclusion of the story to the audience. I glanced in IMDb the most different interpretations for the end of the story to ratify my opinion. My vote is six.

Title (Brazil): "Ligação Perdida" ("Missed Call")

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9 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

ONE MISSED CALL is an unsettling horror film with lots of scares by the cult director Takashi Mike

6/10
Author: ma-cortes
12 January 2007

A high school student named Yumi Kamura finds with a group friends in a coffee bar,while her pal Yoko receives a cellular call with a rare tone which she had heard before.Into screen phone appears one missed call.The message is sent for her cellular and contains a horrible shout that sounds like her voice.Besides the call is from three days after.A time later young people receive the call are dead for terrible killing.A strange curse causes a criminal rampage among various adolescents.

The picture gets suspense,horror,shocks,grisly terror and several eerie scenes.The film displays hair-rising and horrifying images with a bit of blood and graphical gore.Mysterious and sinister atmosphere is well made by the photographer Yamamamoto. Takashi Mike(Ichi the killer) direction sometimes is actually creepy and frightening like proves the first entry ¨Dead or alive¨with the execution starring by a mobster and much more in ¨The audition¨.This horror film is inspired by ¨The ring¨with certain remembrance more even storyline coincidences.Like that and in fact happen in the most part of recently Japan horror cinema deals about an urban legend.It's the initial argument for introducing the terror in the ordinary life by means a phone.While the look is suitable spooky and eerie the plot spread to the breaking point and the final resolution results to be a little confused.The flick will like to Japan modern terror cinema enthusiastic.

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