Traveling in the west with a party of tourists, John Strong, a wealthy bachelor, becomes very much interested in a young Indian girl, whose general demeanor suggests refinement. She is ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Robert Thornby ...
John Strong
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Monah
George Stanley ...
A Ranger (as George C. Stanley)
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Storyline

Traveling in the west with a party of tourists, John Strong, a wealthy bachelor, becomes very much interested in a young Indian girl, whose general demeanor suggests refinement. She is insulted by a native ranger, and strong resents the indignity by thrashing him. She is the last of her tribe, and her loneliness and his own, draw her to him. When the rest of the party leave, he remains behind and marries the girl. The ranger still persists in his advances and tries to break up their home. He fails and swears vengeance. One night, Strong hears a rap on the door. He steps outside into the darkness to investigate. He is attacked by a man and in the struggle, Strong is fatally wounded. Reeling into his cabin, he falls dead in the presence of his wife. She remembers the threat of their only enemy who has been repulsed by her, and fastens the deed upon him. She dresses herself in the buckskins of the tribal days among her people, and takes an ancient bow, which she has always kept as an ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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Release Date:

21 August 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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This is a picture of the soul
27 January 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A tragic picture well drawn enough to startle the emotions somewhat at its close, but it is a bit slow in getting under way. In general, one can safely say that it is dangerous to use a squaw-man for a picture's hero. Especially in the West it is likely to displease, but white people everywhere are apt to find in such a character something with which it is hard to sympathize. In this picture, where the center of interest is the squaw, and where the squaw's character is given great dignity, the disqualification is only momentary and soon evaporates. The human soul always and under every circumstance rises above even race and color. This is a picture of the soul. It is quite clean, at least in its big second half of sentimentality, and we commend it as a worthy release. - The Moving Picture World, September 7, 1912


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