The story, which is in two parts, opens with a secret wedding. A young woman, of aristocratic lineage, marries De la Tour, a young nobleman. The relatives of the bride cast her out. The ... See full summary »
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Paul
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Virginia
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The story, which is in two parts, opens with a secret wedding. A young woman, of aristocratic lineage, marries De la Tour, a young nobleman. The relatives of the bride cast her out. The young couple go to Martinique, where a year later the husband dies, leaving his wife and young daughter penniless. Margaret, a young woman whose only family is a son, Paul, takes her in and cares for her. Paul and Virginia grow up together. They are childhood sweethearts. As they grow to manhood and womanhood the ties strengthen. The aunt of the mother of Virginia writes that, as she fears death and that she dreads the possibility of her estate going to strangers, she will educate and provide for Virginia if she be sent to France. The governor arranges for her departure. After Virginia has sailed for France the mother of Paul, noting his melancholy mood, informs him as to the circumstances of his birth, which, she tells him, preclude the possibility of his marrying Virginia. In France Virginia is taken... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Romance | Short

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5 December 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The scenes meant to represent Martinique are poor
6 April 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A two-reel illustration of a once popular romance. Spectators over sixty may get more out of it than the present generation which hasn't read the story. As a picture, it lacks dramatic suspense, but stands on its pleasant sentiment. The scenes meant to represent Martinique are poor; one shows a few palm leaves stuck in the ground, with autumn foliage and half-denuded trees in the background. The hero and heroine, Paul and Virginia, are fine; their acting seems just what it ought to be, in fact, the acting as a whole is the picture's biggest asset, if it isn't its saving grace. - The Moving Picture World, December 14, 1912


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