Ethel Walker and Tom Phelps are engaged to marry, but father objects. Later, when the old gentleman finds his daughter writing a note to Tom, promising him to elope, he calls in blacksmiths... See full summary »
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Tom Phelps
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Colonel Walker
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Ethel Walker
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The Reverend
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The Real Dentist
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Storyline

Ethel Walker and Tom Phelps are engaged to marry, but father objects. Later, when the old gentleman finds his daughter writing a note to Tom, promising him to elope, he calls in blacksmiths and has them put bars on the windows and grating in the door. The next day Tom learns of the girl's imprisonment, and. calling at his dentist's, where he finds Ethel's father has an appointment for the next day. He writes a note to Ethel and tells her to have her father take her with him. Tom disguises as the dentist, and when the couple arrives, he puts the old man in a chair and administers gas. When the old fellow is unconscious, he writes a note and places it in the old fellow's hand, after which the two young people hurry to the minister's. The wedding is in progress when the old man enters and prohibits the bans. However, he is forced to confess that Tom and Ethel have outwitted him and he hands the girl over to the happy young man. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Comedy | Short

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31 October 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The situation itself isn't very amusing
12 May 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

There is much fun in this farce-comedy and the audience had several good laughs; but the situation itself isn't very amusing; it is too forced. It is intended, of course, to be extravagant, and depends for its fun on the humanity that the players contrive to put in their acting. Ethel's papa objected to Tom, but told him that, if he could elope with Ethel before two weeks were up, he could have her and welcome. He then put prison bars on Ethel's window. Tom gets the help of a dentist and gives papa laughing gas enough to keep him quiet until after he and Ethel have had the knot tied by the dominie. The audience enjoyed it, but it is not likely to be long remembered. - The Moving Picture World, November 4, 1911


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