A young man celebrates his engagement to a beautiful girl by a drinking bout at the club. Thoroughly intoxicated, he is put to bed and has a terrible dream in which he sees his own wedding.... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Edit

Storyline

A young man celebrates his engagement to a beautiful girl by a drinking bout at the club. Thoroughly intoxicated, he is put to bed and has a terrible dream in which he sees his own wedding. His bride revolts against his drinking habits, and one of his friends makes love to the unhappy girl. The husband, in drunken jealousy, shoots down the man and is about to destroy himself when the police rush in and overpower him. He awakens to find that his cries have attracted the clubmen, who shake him. The dream makes so vivid an impression that he vows never to touch liquor again. In contrast, the girl is shown in her bedroom talking to her mother of the approaching marriage, and before retiring kneeling down in her night-robe and thanking God for her happiness. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 September 1911 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

It is a sermon-picture, but it's a very human one
13 April 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Two women seated directly behind the reviewer watched this picture apparently with deep interest, and from their comments seemed to approve of and enjoy it. It is a sermon-picture, but it's a very human one. After some pleasing and natural love scenes (the woman behind the reviewer called them "sweet") the lover (Mr. Walthall) gets drunk at an impromptu jollification at the club. His friends have to put him in bed. He has a bad dream. He sees in himself the drunken husband who ill-treats his wife and at length kills one of his friends. This is pictured as a dream and as such it would have been more pleasing if the sleeper's presence had been kept in the picture. It is a bad nightmare and it makes the dreamer decide to drink no more. The closing scenes are as pretty as the early scenes. It is very well acted. - The Moving Picture World, September 23, 1911


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page