Downfall (2004) - News Poster

(2004)

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Nowhere in Africa

Caroline Link’s wonderful, woefully obscure Best Foreign Film winner is an entertaining story of the perils of wartime emigration. It hits hard right now, with our own immigration crackdown underway. A Jewish family smartly escapes Nazi Germany at the 11th hour, only to find themselves imprisoned in detention camps by the British — who ironically consider them dangerous enemy aliens. The show is a glorious growing-up tale for a German tot transplanted to Kenya, and becomes an edgy romantic story when the mother repurposes her amorous needs to help rescue her family.

Nowhere in Africa

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber / Zeitgeist

20019 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 141 min. / Nirgendwo in Afrika / Street Date February 27, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 34.95

Starring Merab Ninidze, Juliane Köhler, Lea Kurka, Karoline Eckertz, Sidede Onyulo, Matthias Habich, Herbert Knaup

Cinematography Gernot Roll

Production Designer Susann Bieling, Uwe Szielasko

Film Editor Patricia Rommel

Original Music Niki Reiser, Jochen Schmidt-Hambrock

Written by Caroline
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Picture Tree reveals Efm trailers, promotes Yuanyuan Rothbauer (exclusive)

International trailers revealed for Hot Dog, Fack Ju Goethe 3, Dark Almost Night.

Source: Hot Dog

Hot Dog

German sales outfit Picture Tree International has revealed key international marketing material for titles including German box office smash Fack ju Göhte 3 (aka Suck Me Shakespeer 3), Til Schweiger action-comedy Hot Dog and Polish crime-drama Dark Almost Night.

Watch the exclusive English-language trailers for these films below.

Like its two predecessors, Fack ju Göhte 3 has proven a huge hit in Germany where it has sold six million tickets.

Hot Dog has also gone down well at home, debuting in first position at the local box office two weeks ago for Warner Bros Germany.

The company’s Efm slate will also comprise Swedish comedy Kingdom Of Sweden - Not Of This World, which is currently in post-production and could get a festival launch in summer or autumn; Austrian drama What You Win On The Swings; German comedy A Jar Full Of Life, which
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Darkest Hour review

Gary Oldman takes on the role of Winston Churchill, in Joe Wright's Darkest Hour. Here's our review...

World War II movies have taken all sorts of forms. While many of them deal with the actual warfare on the battlefield, there have been only a few that look into the decisions behind the scenes like Darkest Hour. Now, just a few months after Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk, we get another look at a similar time around 1940 as the German forces are bearing down on theUK and newly appointed Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman) has to figure out how to deal with them.

See related Creed 2: Sylvester Stallone drops out of directing Creed 2: Sylvester Stallone drops hint at Rocky IV link

We enter the story with a Churchill who is 66-years-old and mostly bedridden. He meets his new secretary Miss Layton (Lily James), who has been hired to
See full article at Den of Geek »

Black Mirror Season 4 Review – ‘Arkangel’

Martin Carr reviews Black Mirror’s Arkangel…

Protecting your child or hindering their development both emotionally and psychologically are the stuff of adult counselling sessions. People pay good money to lay there, unburden themselves and seek solace from a professional practitioner of the mind. Any number of things can lead them to this type of solution, so the question being posed by ‘Arkangel’ is simple. How far would you go as a parent to protect your children, shelter them from bad influences and by default navigate them out of danger?

That of course is only one possible way of looking at this. However Jodie Foster and Charlie Brooker may choose to dress things up, ‘Arkangel’ is no more about parental protection than Downfall was about bunker maintenance made easy circa 1944. This rites of passage slash growing pains time-lapse study in parenting, throws up more than the obvious posers. Like pay
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Quote of the Day: Sally Potter on Being a Feminist vs. Making Feminist Films

Potter: sallypotter.com

Sally Potter is a proud, self-identified feminist. As she told The Guardian in a new interview, everyone on her newest film, the black comedy “The Party,” received equal pay. However, she is hesitant to describe her movies — which include “Orlando,” “Ginger & Rosa,” “The Tango Lesson,” and “Yes” — as feminist in and of themselves.

In Potter’s opinion, the term “feminist” is only being applied to women-directed fare, even though compelling female characters have been featured in plenty of male-helmed films, too. “I object to having my films called feminist, implying they’re only for a certain audience of like-minded people and that the film itself would preach that line,” Potter explained. “Feminist is somehow different from saying ‘anti-racist.’ I would think of my films, or my life, everything in my life, as anti-racist, but you don’t hear that as a label. But feminist film is seen as specific.”

She added, “Why aren’t Ken Loach’s films called feminist? ‘The feminist filmmaker Ken Loach’ or ‘the feminist filmmaker Mike Leigh’ — why don’t we read that? And if not, why not?”

Potter has a point: We are more apt to describe women-directed films as feminist than their men-directed counterparts, even though “feminist” isn’t actually a gender-specific adjective or noun. And it seems that she has no qualm with the term itself — she is simply concerned that the description will marginalize her work.

“I’m completely proud of the word. The feminist movement is one of the most vibrant, extraordinary political movements of the 20th century, and now there’s a younger generation who’s taken it up again with great joy and pleasure, and that’s wonderful to see,” Potter says. “But I object to the way it’s used as a prefix to my work, to ghettoize it, often as part of a criticism rather than an appreciation. I just want to occupy a free space without a prefix. Because what does it mean? I have to ask someone, what exactly do you mean by that term and what is it adding to anyone’s understanding who might go and see the film?”

Starring Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight” trilogy), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”), “The Party” is about a group of friends who gather for a dinner party that goes spectacularly off the rails. It opens in the UK this Friday, October 13. Roadside Attractions is handling the film’s U.S. distribution, but no official release date has been announced yet.

Quote of the Day: Sally Potter on Being a Feminist vs. Making Feminist Films was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Venice Film Review: ‘Krieg’

Krieg” means “war,” but in German director Rick Ostermann’s sophomore film, his second to play in the Horizons sidebar in Venice after debut “Wolfskinder,” the war is a cold one. This is literal, with half the film taking place on an icy, isolated Austrian mountaintop, but also figurative in that the conflict between the story’s two separate time frames feels attritional, with the actual catharsis of dramatic confrontation between the two strands remaining frustratingly minimal. The movie is elegantly shot, and lean as a line of sight down the barrel of a long-range rifle. But it fails to cohere internally and its endothermic nature makes it difficult to warm to as a viewer: From allusive beginning to enigmatic ending, “Krieg” remains as remote as a snowbound Alpine hideaway.

That hideaway is a one-time sculptor’s cabin toward which we see a tiny figure struggle through the thick snow in the film’s desolate opening. Arnold
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 25 Best Performances Not Nominated for an Oscar in the 21st Century, From Kristen Stewart to Andy Serkis

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Performances Not Nominated for an Oscar in the 21st Century, From Kristen Stewart to Andy Serkis
Awards aren’t everything, but no one ever complained about having their hard work recognized. Consider that the impetus behind this list, which looks beyond awards season to shine a spotlight on the performances that have most affected us — if not necessarily the Academy — over the last 17 years. Some were contenders that got snubbed, while others were too out-there to ever be considered; all are worth praising.

Many others were and are, too — so many, in fact, that 25 spots weren’t enough for them all. Consider Denis Lavant’s bravura turn in “Holy Motors” or Maggie Gyllenhaal’s brilliant work in “Secretary,” among so many others, and remember that the first nine months of every moviegoing year feature plenty of performances worth remembering.

25. Jeon Do-yeon, “Secret Sunshine”

Lee Chang-dong movies abound in stellar performances — see also Yoon Jeong-hee in “Poetry” and Sol Kyung-gu and Moon So-ri in “Oasis” — but none
See full article at Indiewire »

Trailer Watch: A Celebration Goes Off the Rails in Sally Potter’s “The Party”

The Party

A star-studded cast swaps barbs in a UK trailer for “The Party.” Described as “a comedy wrapped around a tragedy,” the black and white Sally Potter film features Patricia Clarkson (“House of Cards”), Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight” trilogy), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”).

Janet (Scott Thomas) and Bill (Spall) are hosting a dinner party, but the latter seems both dazed and distracted. He waits until the guests arrive to say, rather formally, “I have an announcement.” We aren’t privy to what that announcement is, but it seems bad. Janet responds by saying she could “kill him.” And Bill and Janet are far from the only sources of drama.

One guest is described as “ridiculously handsome” but “a wanker.” Another is told his “cliches are unbearable.” Some of the exchanges are playful, and others are outright hostile. “I believe in truth and reconciliation,” Janet claims, before becoming overwhelmed with anger and biting herself. It seems like everyone is having a meltdown or on the verge of one.

“As people’s illusions about themselves and each other go up in smoke, along with the canapes, ‘The Party’ becomes a night that began with champagne but ends with blood on the floor,” the film’s official synopsis hints.

The Party” was very warmly received at the Berlinale, and currently boasts a 100 percent “Fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film opens in the UK October 13. A U.S. release date has yet to be announced, but “The Party” is expected to hit North American theaters sometime in February 2018.

https://medium.com/media/811840b8d1102cd4ac1165e413fab615/href

Trailer Watch: A Celebration Goes Off the Rails in Sally Potter’s “The Party” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Olivier Assayas, Juliette Binoche to Reteam on Comedy ‘E-Book’ (Exclusive)

Olivier Assayas, Juliette Binoche to Reteam on Comedy ‘E-Book’ (Exclusive)
Locarno, Switzerland — Following on Kristen Stewart-starrer “Personal Shopper,” Olivier Assayas, president of Locarno’s main International Competition jury, will return to the French language for his next film, tentatively-entitled “E-book,” starring Juliette Binoche, Guillaume Canet, Vincent Macaigne, Christa Theret and Pascal Gregory.

Assayas’ films have been comedic at times, sometimes ironic. But, par for a director whose 17 features range from coming-of-age dramas, such as “Late August, Early September,” to “Demonlover,” set in a world of 3D manga pornography, or “Carlos,” a frenetic true-fact-based political thriller, or “Personal Shopper,” a ghost story, “E-book” once more explores new territory as a more full-blown comedy, here set in a Parisian publishing world. Charles Gilibert, Assayas’ regular producer, produces “E-book” for CG Cinema.

“‘Clouds of Sils Maria’ was a kind of comedy. This is a step further in that direction,” Assayas said at Locarno, ready for jury duty. The film will also be “very much actor and dialogue-driven, part
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Chile’s Growing Film Festival Scene: Sanfic Announces Lineup

Chile’s Growing Film Festival Scene: Sanfic Announces Lineup
The thirteenth edition of Santiago International Film Festival, Sanfic (August 20–27, 2017), the largest film festival in Chile, will present more than 100 international and Chilean films, including productions shown and awarded in festivals such as Cannes, Berlin and Venice. Among the feature films will be 7 world and 14 Latin American premieres.

Sanfic (Santiago International Film Festival) is opening the festival to international press this year with Variety Dailies and important international guests for their Sanfic Industry section. Guest attending include Kim Yutani (Sundance programmer), Javier Martin (Berlinale delegate), Molly O ́Keefe (Tribeca Film Institute — fiction features) and Estrella Araiza (Industry director of Guadalajara Iff), to name a few. Matt Dillon is its special guest along with the renowned director of photography Rainer Klausmann.

The Summit starring Ricardo Darín, Dolores Fonzi and Erica Rivas, with an appearance of Christian Slater and renowned Chilean actors Paulina Garcia and Alfredo Castro

The opening film of the
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Exclusive new poster for Stratton starring Dominic Cooper

This September, Dominic Cooper (Preacher) takes on the role of Special Boat Service operative John Stratton in the action thriller Stratton, director Simon West’s adaptation of the bestselling book series by Duncan Falconer, and we have an exclusive poster for you here courtesy of Vertigo Releasing. Check it out…

Whilst on a mission targeting a laboratory manufacturing biochemical weapons in Iran, Stratton (Dominic Cooper), a determined and dedicated Sbs operative working alongside MI5, and his Us counterpart, Navy Seal Marty (Tyler Hoechlin) discover that their operation has been compromised and must escape. In the mayhem that follows, the mission goes spectacularly wrong and Marty is mortally wounded.

Back at base Stratton is summoned by the big boss at MI6. She has received intel that a former Soviet operative – Barovski – has gone rogue. Thought to be dead for the last 20 years, it is believed Barovski has plans to take revenge
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Bawdy Nun Comedy ‘The Little Hours’ Soars at Specialty Box Office

Bawdy Nun Comedy ‘The Little Hours’ Soars at Specialty Box Office
All of a sudden the scary decline at the indie box office has reversed. Through the first five months of 2017, only four films opening limited in the standard four New York/Los Angeles theaters opened with a per theater average of $20,000. In the last four weeks, four films have opened strong as “Beatriz at Dinner” (Roadside Attractions), “The Big Sick” (Lionsgate) and “The Beguiled” (Focus) opened well and reached crossover crowds.

This week’s addition, Sundance comedy hit “The Little Hours” (Gunpowder & Sky) is the latest surprise. Loosely inspired by the bawdy 14th-century Boccaccio classic “The Decameron” (The Hollywood version starred Joan Fontaine while Pasolini shocked in 1971), this tale is set in the Medieval Italian countryside with bawdy contemporary dialogue as a randy peasant hides out at a convent after his master catches him with his wife. It did strong business at four theaters on two coasts.

This comes the
See full article at Indiewire »

’13 Minutes’ Review: True-Life One-Man Hitler Assassination Plot Makes for Interesting Tale

’13 Minutes’ Review: True-Life One-Man Hitler Assassination Plot Makes for Interesting Tale
In a small German village, a museum has been erected to honor would-be Hitler assassin and carpenter Georg Elser. But outside the town of Konigsbronn, little is known about this country craftsman who might have changed the course of history. As directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel (who made the masterful 2004 film “Downfall”), “13 Minutes” illuminates Elser’s story in a mostly compelling fashion. In November 1939, Elser was arrested on the Swiss border, his pockets full of schematics and suspicious gear. Moments later, a bomb explodes in the Munich Bürgerbräukeller, immediately behind the Führer’s lectern, killing eight people. The film intercuts between the.
See full article at The Wrap »

Donald Trump Is Not Like Hitler, Says the Director of ‘Downfall’

Donald Trump Is Not Like Hitler, Says the Director of ‘Downfall’
Oliver Hirschbiegel’s 2004 drama “Downfall” was the definitive portrait of Adolf Hitler at the end of WWII, examining the dictator during his final days as he ran out of options. It also provided fodder for one of the greatest viral memes of all time — the “Downfall” parody videos, which position fake subtitles over a pivotal scene in which Hitler (Bruno Ganz) lashes out at his staff upon realizing that he’s lost the war. Over the years, Hitler has lashed out over topics ranging from Oasis splitting up to Ben Affleck getting cast as the Batman.

While this wasn’t part of Hirschbiegel’s plan, the video does speak to his skills as a filmmaker, given that the scene is filled with pregnant pauses and sudden bursts of anger that make it the perfect template for so many circumstances.

Read More: ’13 Minutes’ Trailer: ‘Downfall’ Director Oliver Hirschbiegel Dramatizes the Failed
See full article at Indiewire »

Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets U.S. Distribution

The Party

Three months after making its world premiere at the Berlinale, “The Party” has found a U.S. home. Writer-director Sally Potter’s latest feature has been acquired by Roadside Attractions, The Hollywood Reporter writes. Patricia Clarkson toplines the dark comedy.

Set in contemporary London, the black and white film centers on a celebration that goes horribly awry. “The Party” was shot in just 14 days and features a star-studded cast including Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight Rises”), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”).

Sally Potter’s ‘The Party’ may be one of the most witty, outrageous, biting, and entertaining movies that we have ever acquired,” said Roadside Attractions co-founders Howard Cohen and Eric d’Arbeloff. “It has an outstanding cast who take enormous pleasure sparring on screen, physically and verbally. We loved the film from start to bloody finish.”

The film was very warmly received at the Berlinale, and currently boasts a 100 percent “Fresh” rating at Rotten Tomatoes. “The Party” secured UK distribution earlier this month.

Potter is perhaps best known for her Oscar-nominated 1992 adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s “Orlando,” starring Tilda Swinton. She most recently directed the Elle Fanning-starrer “Ginger & Rosa,” a 2012 coming-of-age drama set during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Potter’s other credits include “The Tango Lesson,” “Yes,” and “The Man Who Cried.”

The former choreographer left school when she was 16 years old. “I’d made my first 8mm film at 14 and I absolutely, passionately wanted to be a film director. So I left school and struck out,” she has explained. “I got jobs in restaurants, washing carrots, and joined the London Filmmaker’s Co-op, making tiny, tiny films that just got bigger. Looking back, I think ‘Jesus, living alone, wanting to be a film director’… When I meet 16-year-olds, they’re so young, the little darlings.”

Unfortunately we’re going to have to wait a while to watch “The Party.” Roadside Attractions is planning a North American release for February 2018.

Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets U.S. Distribution was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets UK Distribution

The Party

Sally Potter’s latest film has secured distribution in the UK. ScreenDaily reports that “The Party” has been acquired by Picturehouse Entertainment, with a planned fall release. The star-studded dark comedy made its world premiere in competition at the Berlinale back in February.

Set in contemporary London, the black and white film centers on a celebration that goes horribly awry. “The Party” was shot in just 14 days. Its cast includes Patricia Clarkson (“Learning to Drive”), Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight Rises”), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”).

The pic was produced by Potter’s production company with Christopher Sheppard, Adventure Pictures. Kurban Kassam (“20,000 Days on Earth”) also served as producer.

“I am thrilled to be working with Sally Potter on her wonderful new film. Over a long career, Sally has consistently led the charge in UK independent filmmaking, bringing us a body of films that are at once sharp, fun, and surprising,” commented Clare Binns, director of programming and acquisition at Picturehouse.

Potter is perhaps best known for her 1992 adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s “Orlando,” starring Tilda Swinton. The film received two Oscar nominations. She most recently directed “Ginger & Rosa,” a 2012 coming-of-age drama set during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The film centers on the intense friendship between two teen girls, played by Elle Fanning (“Maleficent”) and Alice Englert (“Beautiful Creatures”). Potter’s other notable films include the BAFTA-nominated “The Tango Lesson,” “Yes” with Joan Allen, “The Man Who Cried,” starring Christina Ricci and Cate Blanchett, and “Rage” with Judi Dench.

We’re still waiting for “The Party” to get picked up in the U.S. The film was very warmly received at the Berlinale, and currently boasts a 100 percent “Fresh” rating at Rotten Tomatoes. With a cast this strong and great reviews, hopefully it’s only a matter of time before a U.S. distributor snags the film.

Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets UK Distribution was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Sally Potter's 'The Party' secures UK distribution

  • ScreenDaily
Sally Potter's 'The Party' secures UK distribution
Exclusive: Berlin competition title gets UK deal.

Sally Potter’s The Party, which premiered in competition at the Berlin Film Festival this year, has secured a UK distribution deal.

Picturehouse Entertainment has reached a deal for the title with sales representative Great Point Media and is plotting a release in Autumn this year.

The film features an ensemble cast including Patricia Clarkson (The Maze Runner), Bruno Ganz (Downfall), Cherry Jones (Whisky Tango Foxtrot), Emily Mortimer (Hugo), Cillian Murphy (The Dark Knight Rises), Kristin Scott Thomas (The English Patient) And Timothy Spall (Mr Turner).

The comedy-drama focuses on a celebratory gathering of friends that goes violently wrong.

Screen’s review at Berlin described it as Potter’s “most enjoyable film to date”.

Backed by Great Point Media, the film was produced by Adventure Pictures, Sally Potter’s production company with her long-term producer Christopher Sheppard together with Kurban Kassam (20,000 Days on Earth, Ginger & Rosa
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘13 Minutes’, a Film By Oliver Hirschbiegel reviewed by Peter Belsito

‘13 Minutes’, a Film By Oliver Hirschbiegel reviewed by Peter Belsito
Opens June 30.“If humanity isn’t free, everything dies with it” — Georg Elser, “13 Minutes”. An intense true story of one man’s failed attempt to assassinate Hitler in 1939 … the ultimate “what if”?

U.S. theatrical release by Sony Pictures Classics to Open in New York & Los Angeles June 30, 2017. International sales by Beta. Premiered at Berlinale 2015.

Georg Elser (Christian Friedel) in “13”

So relevant today as we watch an isolated passionate man’s solitary attempt to eliminate a monstrous dictator whom he can see is destroying society. “13 Minutes” is a true story about an individual in pre War Nazi Germany who can no longer bear to witness the persecution and injustice into which his land has descended and decides to act decisively to eliminate the mad man dictator.

This well made, well directed film, with big sets and cast and a faithfully recreated period brings our own thoughts to bear upon our
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

'My Life As A Courgette' wins top prize at Swiss Film Awards

  • ScreenDaily
'My Life As A Courgette' wins top prize at Swiss Film Awards
The Divine Order takes three awards; Cahier Africain wins two.

My My Life As A Courgette won best fiction film at the Swiss Film Awards, announced on Friday (24 March).

Claude Barras’ stop-motion animation also won best film score, for Sophie Hunter’s soundtrack, and a special Academy award for the casting and directing.

The film won the César for best animation this year, and was also nominated in the same category at the Oscars and Golden Globes.

The other big winner at the event was The Divine Order with three awards.

Petra Volpe’s film, which centres on the fight for equal rights for women in 1970s Switzerland, won best screenplay (Petra Volpe), best actress (Marie Leuenberger) and best performance in a supporting role (Rachel Braunschweig).

The film will receive its international premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 21, with Trust Nordisk handling world sales.

Heidi Specogna’s documentary Cahier Africain received two awards, for best documentary
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’ May Premiere at Cannes, Despite That Whole ‘Persona Non Grata’ Thing

Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’ May Premiere at Cannes, Despite That Whole ‘Persona Non Grata’ Thing
Persona non grata no longer? Six years after being banned from the Cannes Film Festival for what might generously be described as an ill-advised Hitler joke, Lars von Trier and his team are said to be in negotiations to premiere his next film on the Croisette. The Danish auteur is currently at work on “The House That Jack Built,” which could potentially debut at Cannes last year.

Read More: Lars von Trier Wants You to Know ‘The House That Jack Built’ Will Be His Most Brutal Film Ever

At a press conference in Dalsland, Sweden, co-producer Louise Vesth alluded to the vaunted French festival, saying “I have talked to the people I know in Cannes and … yeah, maybe.” That could be a big maybe, all things considered.

“I thought I was a Jew for a long time and was very happy being a Jew … Then it turned out that I
See full article at Indiewire »
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