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Film News Roundup: Willem Dafoe to Be Honored by Palm Springs Film Festival

Film News Roundup: Willem Dafoe to Be Honored by Palm Springs Film Festival
In today’s film news roundup, Willem Dafoe is honored, August Maturo gets his first feature film, and Fathom Events dates the documentary “Alien Intrusion.”

Festival Award

The 29th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival has selected Willem Dafoe for its Icon Award for his performance in “The Florida Project.”

The award will be presented at the festival’s gala on Jan. 2 at the Palm Springs Convention Center.

Willem Dafoe is a versatile actor who has appeared in over one hundred films in his stellar career,” said festival chairman Harold Matzner. “In ‘The Florida Project,’ Dafoe delivers a career defining performance, as a hotel manager overseeing his sometimes unruly residents, which has received numerous critical accolades.”

Past recipients of the Icon Award include Michael Douglas, Robert Duvall, Tom Hanks, and Meryl Streep. For his performance in the film, Dafoe received best supporting actor recognition from the New York Film Critics, Los Angeles Film Critics,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlinale 18: What’s News

Dieter Kosslick will not renew his contract, ending May 2019, as head of BerlinaleDieter Kosslick will not renew his contract, ending May 2019, as head of Berlinale

Festival Director Dieter Kosslick in response to a letter signed by a group of German directors concerning the future of the Berlinale:

I can understand that these directors want transparency when it comes to the process of reforming the Berlinale. Its future is a matter of great importance for all us. Minister of State and Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media Prof. Monika Grütters will be in charge of any proceedings.My contract ends on May 31, 2019. The Supervisory Board has asked me to submit a proposal for the potential restructuring of the Berlinale. I will do so — and this proposal will be totally independent of me personally.

Seventy-nine German directors wrote a petition asking for transparency in the process, it was recently published in Der Spiegel.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ to Open 2018 Berlin Film Festival

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ to Open 2018 Berlin Film Festival
The 2018 Berlin Film Festival has announced it will open with the world premiere of Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” on February 15. The film will mark Anderson’s third trip to Berlin’s Competition section, following “The Royal Tenenbaums,” “The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou,” and The Grand Budapest Hotel,” the latter of which opened the 64th Berlin Film Festival in 2014 and won the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize.

Read More:Wes Anderson Movies Ranked From Worst To Best

Isle of Dogs” will be the first animated movie to open the Berlin Film Festival in its 68-year history. The film is set in Megasaki City after a decree from Mayor Kobayashi expels all canines to an island garbage-dump. 12-year-old Atari Kobayashi flies to “Trash Island” in search of his bodyguard dog Spots, and so begins an epic journey that will decide the fate of the entire city.

The voice cast
See full article at Indiewire »

Isle Of Dogs to open Berlin Film Festival by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-12-04 10:33:55

Isle Of Dogs will open the Berlinale Photo: 20th Century Fox The 68th Berlin International Film Festival will open at the Berlinale Palast on February 15, 2018 with the world premiere of Wes Anderson’s animated film Isle Of Dogs, which features the voice talents of Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Liev Schreiber and Bill Murray.

Anderson has previously presented three films in the Berlinale Competition: The Royal Tenenbaums (2002), The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2005), and The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) which opened the 64th Berlin International Film Festival and won the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize.

Festival director Dieter Kosslick said: “I’m most delighted that Wes Anderson will kick off the Berlinale Competition again. Isle of Dogs will be the first animated film to open the Festival – a film that will capture audiences’ hearts with its Wes Anderson charm.”

Isle of Dogs tells the story of Atari Kobayashi, 12-year-old ward to a corrupt mayor.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle Of Dogs’ To Open Berlin Film Festival 2018

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle Of Dogs’ To Open Berlin Film Festival 2018
After charming audiences with 2014’s Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize winner The Grand Budapest Hotel, Wes Anderson is returning to the Berlin Film Festival. The filmmaker’s stop-motion animated Isle Of Dogs has been set to world premiere in competition as the opening night film of the 68th Berlinale on February 15, 2018. Anderson has previously presented three films in the Berlinale competition: The Royal Tenenbaums (2002), The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou (2005) and The Gr…
See full article at Deadline »

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ to Open 2018 Berlin Film Festival

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ to Open 2018 Berlin Film Festival
The world premiere of Wes Anderson’s animated “Isle of Dogs” will open the 2018 Berlin Film Festival, the first animated movie to do so in Berlinale history.

It will be whimsical auteur Anderson’s fourth film in competition at the Berlinale, following “The Royal Tenenbaums” (2002), “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” (2005), and “The Grand Budapest Hotel” (2014). “The Grand Budapest Hotel” also opened the Berlin Film Festival and won the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize.

“I’m most delighted that Wes Anderson will kick off the Berlinale competition again,” festival director Dieter Kosslick said Monday. “‘Isle of Dogs’ will be the first animated film to open the festival, a film that will capture audiences’ hearts with its Wes Anderson charm.”

Isle of Dogs” is scheduled for release in U.S. cinemas March 23, 2018. Internationally, the film will open in cinemas from April 2018.

Fox Searchlight is distributing the film, which is produced by Indian Paintbrush and which, like [link=tt
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wes Anderson's 'Isle of Dogs' to Open Berlin Film Festival

Wes Anderson's 'Isle of Dogs' to Open Berlin Film Festival
Wes Anderson's animated feature Isle of Dogs will open the 2018 Berlin International Film Festival on Feb. 15, organizers unveiled Monday.

This will mark the second time Anderson has opened Berlin, following the world premiere of The Grand Budapest Hotel at the 2012 version of the fest, where it won the Silver Bear Grand Jury prize. The American director also premiered The Royal Tenenbaums and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou in competition in Berlin.

“I’m most delighted that Wes Anderson will kick off the Berlinale competition again," said Berlin festival director Dieter Kosslick. "Isle of Dogs will be the first animated
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Wes Anderson’s Animated Film ‘Isle of Dogs’ To Open 2018 Berlin Film Festival

The 68th Berlin International Film Festival will open at the Berlinale Palast on February 15, 2018 with the world premiere of Wes Anderson’s animated film Isle of Dogs.

Anderson has previously presented three films in the Berlinale Competition: The Royal Tenenbaums (2002), The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2005), and The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) which opened the 64th Berlin International Film Festival and won the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize.

“I’m most delighted that Wes Anderson will kick off the Berlinale Competition again. Isle of Dogs will be the first animated film to open the Festival – a film that will capture audiences’ hearts with its Wes Anderson charm,” says Festival Director Dieter Kosslick.

Isle of Dogs tells the story of Atari Kobayashi, 12-year-old ward to corrupt Mayor Kobayashi. When, by Executive Decree, all the canine pets of Megasaki City are exiled to a vast garbage-dump, Atari sets off alone in a miniature
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘The Odyssey’ Review: Dir. Jérôme Salle (2017)

The Odyssey review: Jérôme Salle brings this biopic of pioneer, innovator, filmmaker, researcher and conservationist Jacques Cousteau to the big-screen.

The Odyssey review by Steve Palace.

Younger generations may not know the name Jacques Cousteau, but his legacy of undersea innovation and chronicling of the natural world lives on. Wes Anderson used him as inspiration for comedy The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, which struggled to match the real life spectacle the maverick Captain created with his crew aboard the Calypso. Can director Jérôme Salle do better with lush biopic The Odyssey/L’odyssée?

The film starts in the 1940s, with Cousteau (Lambert Wilson) having helped develop the Aqua-Lung, enabling divers to breathe easier beneath the waves. As a result he and his colleagues spend sustained periods recording hitherto-unseen features of deep sea existence, to the delight of rapt audiences. However when he decides to leave the Navy to concentrate
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Adidas Has Reproduced The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Sneakers!

I've always wanted my very own pair of Steve Zissou sneakers! Adidas has recreated the Rom Zissou sneakers from Wes Anderson fantastic film The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. Unfortunately, there were only 100 pairs made. The shoes were released for a music festival in Paris called We Love Green as a tribute to festival performer Seu Jorge, whose music was featured heavily on the movie’s soundtrack.

I hope that Adidas considers a wider release so that I can get myself a pair!

Via: SneakerNews
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The 25 greatest movies about making movies

Mark Harrison May 19, 2017

From the currently playing Their Finest to the likes of Bowfinger and Boogie Nights, we salute the movies about making movies...

If you haven't caught up yet, Their Finest is currently playing in UK cinemas and it's a gorgeous little love letter to perseverance through storytelling, set against the backdrop of a film production office at the British Ministry of Information during the Second World War. Based on Lissa Evans' novel, Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy play characters whose access to the film industry has been contingent on the global crisis that takes other young men away from such trifling matters, and it's a real joy to watch.

Among other things, the film got us thinking about other films about making films. We're not talking about documentaries, even though Hearts Of Darkness, the documentary about the making of Apocalypse Now, may be the greatest film about
See full article at Den of Geek »

Wes Anderson Movies Ranked From Worst To Best

Wes Anderson Movies Ranked From Worst To Best
Let’s get this out of the way right from the top: Wes Anderson has never made a bad movie, and — in all likelihood — he probably never will. He’s too particular, too immaculate, too in command of his craft. Of course, the fact that he has always been so sure of himself only makes it more tempting to chart the progress of his career and to measure his films against each other. Or maybe it’s just fun because there are still only eight of them, and everyone seems to have their own favorite. Who could say?

Read More: Wes Anderson’s Style: Watch 10 Iconic Movies That Influenced Him

Here are all of Wes Anderson’s feature films, ranked from “worst” to best.

8. “Bottle Rocket

Wes Anderson arrived fully formed (or close to it), and so much of his cinematic ethos can be distilled from the very first shot of his very first film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Poster Has Lots of Akira Kurosawa (and Dogs)

…Let’s hope the dogs don’t die.

On Tuesday, the first poster for Wes Anderson’s newest feature film since 2014’s The Grand Budapest Hotel was released. Whilst not much is known about the story of Isle of Dogs, its poster reveals small details about what to expect, and, more importantly, the influence of Akira Kurosawa on the stop-motion animation.

Set in Japan, the poster’s large, red font places the Japanese title at the center, with its English translation held within the script. Wes Anderson’s posters usually have either one clear defining image at the forefront or a depiction of the ensemble cast, so Isle of Dogs is a slight departure from what Anderson’s audience are used to.

The poster for The Royal Tenenbaums places family at the center while Anderson’s classic Futura font title stayed beneath the family as something that was not meant to draw attention. Moonrise Kingdom
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Wes Anderson’s Manly Men

In search of male desire in a twee world.

Here’s a thesis: with the singular exception of his animated adventure story, Fantastic Mr. Fox, the movies of Wes Anderson are fundamentally about nice, fiery desire. But while a number of his movies explore this through the conventional terrain of the heterosexual relationship and its discontents — The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom come to mind — others explore more curious expressions of desire, leaving Anderson’s plain and plaintive ladies behind. Shared aesthetic characteristics, from the constantly reprised Cornell boxes to the carefully referenced dead Eastern European novelists, are subject of much ruthless discussion among Anderson acolytes. And, considering Anderson’s diligent cooperation with turning a collection of essays and interviews into a $35 coffee table book, that seems to be the dissection that Anderson embraces. But what are those other, male-centric movies actually about? Most critics, when forced to give something like a serious and meaningful answer, will
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Biopics vs. Their Fictional Counterparts

Some people’s lives are best told truthfully, others more loosely.

In one corner, we have Rocky, the iconic Best Picture-winning boxing movie starring Sylvester Stallone as the made-up Rocky Balboa. In the other corner, we have Chuck, an upcoming biopic starring Liev Schreiber as real-life boxer Chuck Wepner. The latter primarily depicts the 1975 bout between Wepner and Muhammad Ali, which inspired Stallone to write the script for Rocky. He’s since tried to downplay the connection, especially after being sued by Wepner, but it’s close enough to being a film a clef as any.

Chuck received mostly positive reviews when it played the big film festivals last fall, but it’s unlikely to become the phenomenon, let alone Oscar darling, that Rocky was. Its legacy surely won’t be as lasting, in part because true biopics don’t tend to get sequels. There are a lot of benefits to fictionalized accounts of real events and
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

15 Good Dark Comedies to Watch on Netflix in April 2017

This is no festive prank, these movies are hilarious.

Let’s face it, the world is a wreck. Every day things look bleaker than they did the day before. It’s gotten to the point where, if you can’t learn to laugh at our misery, you’re finished. If you need some help figuring out how to find humor in even the worst bits of the human experience, dark comedies work, Netflix has them, and we’ve made a list of the good ones. Click on the films’ titles to be taken to their Netflix pages.

Pick of the Month: This Must Be the Place (2011)

I can’t think of another movie in recent times that’s been so good and gotten so little love and attention in return. Maybe that’s because the concept of a former 80s glam rocker who still wears his makeup (Sean Penn) tracking down the Nazi concentration camp guard who
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

New to Streaming: ‘Right Now, Wrong Then,’ ‘The Life Aquatic,’ ‘The Discovery,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Blackcoat’s Daughter (Osgood Perkins)

Osgood Perkins’ debut feature, The Blackcoat’s Daughter – originally known as February at its premiere at Tiff last year – is a stylish exercise in dread, teasing out its slow-drip horrors with precision, and building a deliriously evil presence that hovers along the fringes. However, there’s a thin line between mystery and vagueness in storytelling, and it becomes difficult to decide where a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Capturing the Cousteau allure by Anne-Katrin Titze

Jérôme Salle on Lambert Wilson as Jacques-Yves Cousteau: "It helps when you ask a very nice person to be a very tough person."

Once again, inside the Furman Gallery at Lincoln Center during the Rendez-Vous with French Cinema exhibition of Paul Ronald's color photographs from Federico Fellini's 81/2, where I met Christophe Honoré for a conversation on Les Malheurs De Sophie, The Odyssey (L'Odyssée) director Jérôme Salle spoke with me on the performances of Lambert Wilson and Audrey Tautou. Bill Murray and Cate Blanchett in Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, composer Alexandre Desplat, Calypso captain Albert Falco (Vincent Heneine), nicknamed Bébert (which recalls for me the cat featured in Emmanuel Bourdieu's Louis-Ferdinand Céline), were also washed ashore.

Jérôme Salle at Paul Ronald's 81/2 circus photos: "Audrey is wonderful." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Odyssey (shot by Matias Boucard, screenplay, co-written with Laurent Turner) is
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Now, voyager by Anne-Katrin Titze

Jérôme Salle: "I'm the kind of director who loves to tell stories with pictures more than words." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In 2015, at an Oceana event hosted by Cobie Smulders, I spoke with Jacques-Yves Cousteau's granddaughter and Expedition Blue Planet filmmaker, Alexandra Cousteau. In my conversation with The Odyssey (L'Odyssée) director, Jérôme Salle, we explore the world around Alexandra's grandfather portrayed by Lambert Wilson in his film with Audrey Tautou as Jacques' wife Simone, Pierre Niney (Adrian in François Ozon's Frantz) and Benjamin Lavernhe as their sons.

Simone (Audrey Tautou) and Jacques Cousteau (Lambert Wilson)

With a screenplay, co-written with Laurent Turner, loosely based on the books by Jean-Michel Cousteau (My Father, the Captain: Life with Jacques Cousteau) and Albert Falco (Capitaine de La Calypso) and a score by longtime Wes Anderson composer Alexandre Desplat, Salle takes us on a personal family journey at sea.

We go from "Cousteau
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

New to Netflix in March: ‘The Discovery,’ ‘Burning Sands’ and More Sundance Offerings

  • Indiewire
New to Netflix in March: ‘The Discovery,’ ‘Burning Sands’ and More Sundance Offerings
Netflix has announced the new titles arriving on the streaming platform next month, with five original films leading the pack: “Burning Sands” (3/10), “Deidra & Laney Rob a Train” (3/17), “Pandora” (3/17), “The Most Hated Woman in America” (3/24) and “The Discovery” (3/31). Three of these — “Burning Sands,” “Deidra & Laney,” “The Discovery” — are Netflix Origins that premiered during the Sundance Film Festival in January.

Read More: ‘The Discovery’ Review: Rooney Mara And Jason Segel Find Life After Death — Sundance 2017

Also available to stream next month are “The Bfg,” “Pete’s Dragon,” “The Life Aquatic,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Chicago,” “Jurassic Park,” “Memento,” “Million Dollar Baby,” “Evolution,” “Fire at Sea” and “Welcome to New York,” among others, while the likes of “Jaws,” “Animal House,” “Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey” and “Entertainment” are all expiring at the end of February. Find a full list of what’s coming in March below.

Read More: Why Martin Scorsese’s Netflix Deal Is
See full article at Indiewire »
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