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Taking President McKinley's Body from Train at Canton, Ohio (1901)

Here, as in the other pictures, we secured a most advantageous location, and we present a life size view of the casket containing the body of President McKinley as it is slowly and ... See full summary »
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Here, as in the other pictures, we secured a most advantageous location, and we present a life size view of the casket containing the body of President McKinley as it is slowly and carefully taken from the window of the car which bore it from the Capitol to Canton. The casket is placed upon the shoulders of ten stalwart sailors and soldiers and borne to the waiting hearse, followed by President Roosevelt and Cabinet. Written by Edison Catalog

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October 1901 (USA)  »

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Body Leaving Train, Canton, O.  »

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Edited into Complete Funeral Cortege at Canton, Ohio (1901) See more »

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Edison short
20 June 2009 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Taking President McKinley's Body from Train at Canton, Ohio (1901)

*** (out of 4)

Two cameras pick up the action this time as we see McKinley's casket being removed from the train and carried through the station. We see ten soldiers and sailors carrying the casket to a waiting hearse. The print I watched was slightly faded on the left hand side of the screen, right where the casket was being removed and it really came off like a light shining on the assassinated President. The entire short is very touching because you can just sense the somber and sad mood of everyone in the frame.

President McKinley was shaking hands at the Pan-American Exposition when Leon Czolgosz would fire to shots into his stomach. At first the shooting seemed serious but over the next few days the President's condition would improve to where the media was reporting that he would be okay. His condition took a turn for the worse and he ended up dying on September 14. Edison was known for capturing many historic events so they sent cameramen to Buffalo, NY, Washington D.C., and to Canton, OH where the funeral would be held. You do have to think that Edison was seeing dollar signs when they decided to film all of this but thankfully for us it gives us a view into the past to one of the saddest parts of our history.


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