2.7/10
3,656
62 user 49 critic

The Real Cancun (2003)

Sixteen American college students drink, flirt, fight and canoodle during their Spring Break vacation in Cancun, Mexico.

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1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Benjamin Fletcher ...
Himself (as Benjamin 'Fletch' Fletcher)
Nicole Frilot ...
Roxanne Frilot ...
David Ingber ...
...
Amber Madison ...
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Marquita 'Sky' Marshall ...
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Heidi Vance ...
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Sarah Wilkins ...
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Storyline

After a nationwide casting search including college campuses across the country--Arizona State University, University of Oklahoma, University of Vermont, University of Wisconsin at Madison, University of Georgia, Texas Tech, Boston University and Washington State University--the filmmakers cast a unique collection of real people ready to explore reality's barriers beyond the limits of television, while on the ultimate Spring Break vacation, with surprising results. Designed to be the first true reality feature film, six camera crews followed the cast--made up of 16 American college students--and filmed their exploits as they immersed and indulged in the Spring Break revelry of Cancun, Mexico. Filmed 24 hours a day over the course of a week in March 2003, the movie was shot on location and reveals the students' exploits through interviews and planned group activities, as well as through their own spontaneous adventures. Written by Sujit R. Varma

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

No scripts. No actors. No rules. Anything can happen during spring break, and it did.

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong sexuality/nudity, language and partying | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

25 April 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Real Spring Break  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,108,796, 27 April 2003, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$3,713,002, 11 May 2003
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was tagged as the first reality movie. See more »

Goofs

The amount of beer in Jeff's 40 changes inconsistently between shots. See more »

Quotes

Jorell Washington: Can I ask a question, though?
Marquita 'Sky' Marshall: What?
Jorell Washington: Had he persued you for the whole trip, where would it have got him, honestly?
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Crazy Credits

"Custodian of Records is Jonathan Murray of Spring Break Films, LLC. Produced March 15-23, 2003. All records required by law to be maintained by us are located at: 6007 Sepulveda Boulevard, Van Nuys, CA 91411." -- this sort of disclaimer is usually affixed to adult movies. See more »

Connections

References The Breakfast Club (1985) See more »

Soundtracks

Take It To Da House
Written by Harry Wayne Casey (as Harry Casey), James Brown, Corey Evans, Richard Finch, Charles Bobbitt (as Charles Bobbit), Maurice Young, Mark Seymour, Adam Duggini, Katrina Taylor and Fred Wesley
Performed by Trick Daddy
Courtesy of Slip-N-Slide Records/Atlantic Recording Corp.
Under license from Warner Strategic Marketing
Contains a sample of "The Boss" performed by James Brown
Courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Music, Inc.
Contains a sample of "Boogie Shoes"
Performed by KC & The Sunshine Band
Courtesy of Rhino Entertainment Company
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User Reviews

 
Un-cannily works as an 'All-American' reality movie, not set there of course...
26 April 2003 | by See all my reviews

...and in a blatant way can be seen for viewers across the world as a comparison to the Roman Empire. In fact, I could see an interesting comparison between The Real Cancun and Fellini's Satyricon, since both works deal with the constant, superfluous binging and purging of sex and partying. But of course, Real Cancun can not hold a candle; make that a lighter, to Satyricon in terms of movie-making.

The Real Cancun is a spin-off of the Real World, which in and of itself is an oxymoron of an idea for a show since the players audition to be ON the Real World and then the seasons that have since gone on in the 90's show how they don't work, sit around there houses all day, get assignments from staff people, party, or go and team up with the cast of Road Rules. Now, however, the producers have decided to turn the show into a movie, in which they find more desperate and privileged 18-24 year olds who want to have fun during spring break in Mexico's Cancun.

The docu-movie could (or now I should say could've) work as a full-on documentary, yet it doesn't seem there is anything real when dealing with HIRED people who feel they need to heighten there expressions, mannerisms, and dialogue when on camera. There is very possibly not one minute of footage where a character is caught off guard while the camera is on him and her (this excludes the quick scenes of a hidden camera in the rooms as couples have rapid-fire sexual encounters), and thus it comes off as mostly dribble for people in there age group, such as myself, to laugh at.

The people are real, to be certain, and that's the film's, as well as the show's, crutch - whenever a director tells real people to act as themselves, which is never the case when dealing with the intellect of these caricatures - when a group of staff personnel host parties and out of nowhere Snoop Dogg shows up it shows as a quasi-reality, interesting, perhaps, but certainly not something that can easily be identified with. At least in Jackass: the Movie, there was a sense of jubilant, if constantly crude, humor to the proceedings of the reality of the situation (i.e. a mother finding an alligator right in here kitchen). That there are so many booze, sex, and gossip actors going through the same motions scene after scene (should I have another body shot? Should I go out in the ocean drunk? Should I go the next step with this girl? Etc.) makes it very tough to handle after a while.

I know there is, and will be evidently, an audience for this picture; lord knows that's how the show has been running ad nauseum for the past 10+ years- but make no mistake, this is NOT for a wide range of audiences. Coincidentally, similar to a Fellini movie (except that any one Fellini scene works with a much higher intellect than this entire movie does)...I can personally say, as someone who considers himself a fairly sociable and fun-loving guy, that if I was around these people for longer than a day or night I'd have an aneurism (unless I was drunk enough, of course) ....so, as a view of my generation, objectively, I actually give it a B+. However, as a film in and of itself, it's a stinking F+ (a + for the moment with the jellyfish).


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