Private Robert Adair gets a ten days' furlough to visit his mother who is very ill. She dies and we see Robert and Tom, his brother, burying their mother. Robert has to leave his brother ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Private Robert Adair - The Soldier
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Tom - Robert's Brother
Julio Moreno ...
Roco
George Miller ...
Jim - the Squaw Man
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Private Robert Adair gets a ten days' furlough to visit his mother who is very ill. She dies and we see Robert and Tom, his brother, burying their mother. Robert has to leave his brother and return to camp before his furlough is up, leaving Tom with Roco, an old friend. Roco, while en route to visit Tom, meets Jim, a squaw man, who asks him for money, which Roco refuses. Two of the squaw man's Indian associates come up and he gives them some whiskey and secures their assistance in his determination to rob Roco, but finding two men at the home he tries to coerce the Indians into shooting them both. They refuse, however, even when tempted by liquor, so the squaw man shoots, killing Robert's brother. Roco manages to get away and warns Robert, whom he finds in the village, where he has stopped for food. Robert, when he learns the sad news, forgets about his being a soldier and returns to the home, to find it ransacked and his brother dead. He swears vengeance and after securing the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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7 December 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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It fails to make its intention clear soon enough
9 April 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This picture has a situation, a rather crude one, but enough to make the offering exciting. It fails to make its intention clear soon enough, and is in its early scenes awkward; it seems both stiffly acted and the scenes come jerkily. When the soldier on furlough begins his pursuit of "Jim the Squaw Man," which, by the way, is to make him overstay his time, the action holds. We saw it twice, and in both theaters the spectators made at its thrilling moments exclamations, sometimes profane, which show that it was certainly getting over. It isn't as good as this company's best work. Its author is Romaine Fielding, who plays a minor part, the soldier's brother shot by Jim. Robert Adair plays the soldier, and he certainly doesn't lie down on the rough and dangerous work that his part demanded. George Miller plays the squaw man, and is just as brash in his acting as Adair. Julio Moreno also has a part. - The Moving Picture World, December 21, 1912


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