6.8/10
12,228
135 user 84 critic

A Home at the End of the World (2004)

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "The Hours" comes a story that chronicles a dozen years in the lives of two best friends who couldn't be more different. From suburban Cleveland in... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Andrew Chalmers ...
...
Carlton Morrow
Asia Vieira ...
Emily
Quancetia Hamilton ...
Dancing Party Guest
Jeff J.J. Authors ...
Frank (as Jeffrey Authors)
Lisa Merchant ...
Frank's Date
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Burt Morrow
...
...
Jonathan Glover (1974)
...
Ned Glover
...
Alice Glover
...
...
Jonathan Glover (1982)
...
Clare (as Robin Wright Penn)
...
Club Boy
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Storyline

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "The Hours" comes a story that chronicles a dozen years in the lives of two best friends who couldn't be more different. From suburban Cleveland in the 60s, to New York City in the 80s, where they meet an older woman, the film charts a journey of trials, triumphs, loves and losses. Now the question is: can they navigate the unusual triangle they've created and hold their friendship together? Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Family can be whatever you want it to be.

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong drug content, sexuality, nudity, language and a disturbing accident | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

14 October 2004 (Netherlands)  »

Also Known As:

Uma Casa no Fim do Mundo  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$6,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$64,728 (USA) (23 July 2004)

Gross:

$1,029,017 (USA) (22 October 2004)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Is an adaptation from Michael Cunningham's 1990 novel of the same name, which in turn was expanded from a short story entitled "White Angel", published in the New Yorker in 1988. See more »

Goofs

When Claire is running away from her friends into the desert, the bushes wiggle twice as the cameraman passes by. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[Emily is having sex with Carlton and sees Bobby in the doorway]
Emily: Oh my god!
Carlton Morrow: Come on, Em, Bobby doesn't care!
Emily: I care!
Carlton Morrow: Just relax!
Emily: Kiss my ass!
See more »

Connections

Features All About Eve (1950) See more »

Soundtracks

Only You
Written by Vince Clarke
Performed by Yazoo
Courtesy of Sire Records/Mute Records Ltd.
By Arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A touching movie from a great novel
7 February 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Michael's Cunningham's book is so moving I was afraid to be deeply disappointed by the movie adaptation. Although 90 min is barely enough to narrate the story in its emotional complexity, the movie is very faithful to the book, probably because the screenplay is from Cunningham himself. The acting is excellent, and the soundtrack featuring Laura Nyro is beautiful, and if some of the book's interest is lost in translation, it still makes a pretty good movie. I find some detractors' arguments pretty amazing, as if all they'd watched was the trailer. To suggest that after Jules & Jim any movie containing a threesome is worthless, that any movie taking place in the 70s-80s is obsolete, that there was too much or not enough sex scenes, or that the AIDS theme is not developed enough, is plain ludicrous. This is not a movie about an era, about homosexuality, or about the AIDS epidemics. This is about (re)creating a place out of time and geography, where the world makes sense (again). A home, in other words. This is about loving another being (or two, since one is never complete, never enough) irrespective of family links, gender, and the established social codes. The characters are struggling to escape the rules to enjoy the "big noisy world around" and find a natural place in it. They are the opposite of stereotypical characters, at least once they are fully revealed to themselves. As for the end, it is not "unconclusive", it is what is called an open ending, and probably in this case the perfect ending, which means the only possible one. My advice: watch it, and read the novel too.


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