May Prescott, daughter of wealthy parents, is somewhat of a coquette. Her brother invites a clergyman friend. The sister is much impressed with him. The favored suitor of the girl is a man ... See full summary »

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Tom - a Young Clergyman
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May Prescott
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May Prescott, daughter of wealthy parents, is somewhat of a coquette. Her brother invites a clergyman friend. The sister is much impressed with him. The favored suitor of the girl is a man of wealth but she does not love him, thinking only of his social standing. The clergyman is going to open their cottage for the return of his mother. He gets a woman to clean the place. He then asks May if she will go with him and see if the house is in order. She consents. When they reach the little home, they are both thirsty, and begin to prepare a little tea party. Fearing that she will get her white dress spoiled, Tom takes from a closet a long gingham apron and tells her to put it on which she does reluctantly. After the tea she goes with him in her machine to meet his mother. They leave May at her home, and her chauffeur drives the mother and son to their cottage. Later her engagement to the middle aged man is announced. Suddenly she rises from the supper table, pleads a headache, and leaves ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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28 November 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Well might it be thrown on the screen in any church entertainment
6 April 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Here is a full reel without a harsh word in it. It is a story of a minister and his love. Well might it be thrown on the screen in any church entertainment. A woman would say it is a sweet story. So it is, and a simple one. Nevertheless, it holds by reason of the art of the players; of the sequence, the continuity, of the scenes. The climax comes when May, the daughter of well-to-do parents, on the eve of her wedding breaks the engagement she has made with a man of means. She drives in her machine to the home of Tom, her brother's clergyman friend. Tom has been at his mother's knee, seeking consolation in his sorrow; he has told her that he is in love and heartbroken. Tom has just before gone to the kitchen and put the kettle on the stove. He has put the tea in the pot. Waiting for the water to boil, he has returned to his mother's knee. She is stroking his hair. May starts to enter the clergyman's home at the front door. She changes her mind and goes to the kitchen entrance and steps in. She sees the kettle simmering on the stove. She tiptoes across the floor and peeks in on the domestic scene in the sitting room. She throws across the back of a kitchen chair an expensive wrap. She goes to a closet and. takes down a gingham apron, the same, by the way, which in an earlier scene she had in a pet thrown off, convinced that it did not harmonize with her social station. The apron is promptly thrown over the trailing satin gown. May makes the tea, puts it on a tray, enters the sitting room and, without a word or a turn even of the eye, put the tray on the table. Tom and his mother show their amazement. The mother senses the situation and smilingly glides out of the room. Tom puts out both hands to May in dumb query. She is in his arms. Mr. August takes the role of the clergyman. Miss Hawley has the part of May. The work of the two and of the entire support is convincing, excellent. - The Moving Picture World, December 14, 1912


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