Anton Paxton, a young man of saving habits, bids his aged mother good-bye at home and walks to the village. On his way he stops to chat with his sweetheart, Great Anderson, at the gate of ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
King Baggot ...
Anton Paxton
Lucille Young ...
Greta Anderson
Robert Z. Leonard ...
The Village Blacksmith
George Loane Tucker ...
The Tourist
J. Farrell MacDonald
Lassie ...
Lassie - a Dog
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Anton Paxton, a young man of saving habits, bids his aged mother good-bye at home and walks to the village. On his way he stops to chat with his sweetheart, Great Anderson, at the gate of her home, and is surprised to find her talking with the village blacksmith, who is his rival for the hand of the girl. Anton is downhearted, but the girl shows her preference for him and the blacksmith goes away in a rage. The blacksmith goes to his forge where he is accosted by a hunter on horseback, whose horse has a loose shoe, which the blacksmith tightens. In dismounting, the hunter drops his purse and his dog picks it up and in running through the forest drops the wallet among the rocks. The hunter mounts his horse, whistles to his dog, and rides to the village inn. Anton leaves his sweetheart and goes on to the village and in passing the shop of the smith, he stoops and picks up a piece of string, which he absent-mindedly places in his pocket, and passes on. The blacksmith and his assistant ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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15 June 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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One cannot help feeling that the Imp people lost a big opportunity in this picture
20 February 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

There is much truth in this story, but it is overdrawn. A youth of the village is accused of stealing a pocketbook which the owner's dog carried off. Of course there's no proof, but everyone in the village believes he did take it. What he really picked up was the piece of string which is cleverly utilized to keep the story coherent. One feels that it was a mistake to have the man's own mother believe he took the pocketbook; it argues badly for the man's past reputation and, while it seems to give a more tragic situation, lessens our interest in the man and therefore in the story. Such an incident would probably have divided village opinion strongly, and a nice church scrap would perhaps have followed the minister's sermon on the matter. If the picture could have had a parting scene and a reconciliation scene, even more worthwhile. One cannot help feeling that the Imp people lost a big opportunity in this picture. - The Moving Picture World, July 1, 1911


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