The children of Joshua Hamilton, a man of sixty, are afraid of his marrying again. They keep a close watch on him, but be escapes on several occasions, and gets in the company of ladies. ... See full summary »
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Cast

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Joshua Hamilton - Father (as Alexander Francis)
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Joshua Hamilton's Sister
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Joshua Hamilton's Son
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Mary Hamilton - Joshua's Daughter
Lamar Johnstone ...
Joshua's Sister's Son
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Storyline

The children of Joshua Hamilton, a man of sixty, are afraid of his marrying again. They keep a close watch on him, but be escapes on several occasions, and gets in the company of ladies. Always sure to arrive on the scene, however, he is tormented by their surveillance. He gets a letter from a sister in the West, a woman the children have never seen. She tells him she is coming home for a visit. To get the best of his children, he proposes to meet her, and bring her home as his new wife. The plan works out all right and the children are filled with consternation. None of them, of course, will make up to the supposed new wife, and Mary, the daughter who lives with Joshua, leaves home. Joshua and his sister make love on the front porch, in daylight, and farther shock his children. But the worst comes when Joshua's sister receives a wire from her grown-up son, saying he will visit her. Joshua meets the man at the station, and proposes that he act the part of lover. The young man agrees, ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Comedy | Short

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Release Date:

15 February 1912 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

We don't lose sympathy with father
11 September 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

It was no easy job, as this amusing farce comedy shows, to do this. Father was old enough to enjoy slippers, and a comfortable seat in a sunny window, but he didn't enjoy them. His children tried to "keep an eye on him," but he led them many a dance. He was no foolish, doddering old man, as shown, but an old boy, as bright as a steel trap. The scenes which picture the developing complications are so wisely conducted that we don't lose sympathy with father not yet with the children. After all, the great feat of a farce or farce comedy is the sympathy the spectator can feel for the characters. It is a good farce, well acted and photographed and it gets over. - The Moving Picture World, February 24 1912


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