Peter and Mary Dawson, together with their son, age six, and Peter's aged father, live on a few acres of poor land and are only able to keep the wolf from the door by bard work. Peter's ... See full summary »
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Cast

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The Grandfather
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Mary Dawson - the Daughter-in-Law
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Peter Dawson - the Son
Albert Hackett ...
The Grandson
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Storyline

Peter and Mary Dawson, together with their son, age six, and Peter's aged father, live on a few acres of poor land and are only able to keep the wolf from the door by bard work. Peter's father is a querulous old man, almost helpless and a great care to them. His infirmity causes him to break several china bowls in which his food is served. Mary and Peter are so provoked, that Peter fashioned a rough, homemade wooden bowl from which the old man is obliged to eat. The boy overhears their talk regarding the wooden bowl and a few days later he is missing. After searching the house, Mary and Peter find him in the attic. He has just finished making two rough wooden bowls. Upon being questioned he explains that they are to be used to bold Mary's and Peter's food when he (the boy) is a man and they have grown old. For the first time Mary and Peter realize the example they have set their son. They hasten to treat the old man with greater consideration, giving him a new china bowl and his ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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Release Date:

13 May 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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As though it were a sort of fairy tale told on a set of plates
19 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A picture that pleases through the heart-interest in its situations rather than through any dramatic strength. It teaches a good homely lesson mordantly; but the producer, with fine artistic common sense, has set it apart from ordinary life by costuming it so as to give it a Delft atmosphere, as though it were a sort of fairy tale told on a set of plates. This doesn't weaken the story and makes the moral acceptable. Otherwise it might have seemed a bit too much like just a tract on the inhumanity of treating age-weakened parents as though they were only children. We recognize Mr. Arthur Johnson through his make-up as the granddad who was apt to drop his china bowl, and also Miss Lottie Briscoe as the daughter-in-law. We think the son, in his Dutch wig, is Mr. Mitchell. All do very acceptable work, as does the little boy who pitied the granddad, perhaps a bit too much for naturalness, when his parents made the wooden bowl. Photography is as usual. - The Moving Picture World, June 1, 1912


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