Needs 5 Ratings

The Shark God (1913)

A story of pre-missionary Hawaii, woven around the ancient superstition of the Hawaiians concerning the shark god and its power over the lives of the people, and the love affair of a chief's daughter.

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Cast

Cast overview:
Virginia Brissac
Evelyn Hambly
James Dillon
Rodney Brandt
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Storyline

The young Hawaiian athlete, Keoli, is a leader in the outdoor sports so beloved of the natives. He and his sweetheart, Keala stroll off. They are watched by another who adores Keala. Visitors from a nearby village arrive. One of them is Plilani, a dancer. A dance is held and Plilani fascinates Keoli; she gradually draws him away from his sweetheart. Pliliani makes seductive love to Keoli who loses his head over her fascinations. Kane watches with the girl he thinks so much of. Kane goes to the foolish young fellow and reasons with him, but can make but little impression; poor Keala grieves. Keoli recovers his reason and goes to his love for forgiveness. Pliliani, seeing her power has gone, seeks out the witch doctor, begging him to pray to the Shark God to strangle her rival to death. The old mad does as he is bid and starts to pray the girl to death. She is affected and starts to strangle despite the efforts of her lover. Kane sees her too, and seeks out the dancer and tries to find ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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Release Date:

5 May 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Views of these almost naked natives is rather objectionable
2 September 2017 | by See all my reviews

A slight plot, located in Honolulu, with natives attired in breech clouts for actors. The scenes are artistic and well taken, but exhibitors catering to particular audiences will find perhaps that the close views of these almost naked natives is rather objectionable. The story has to do with certain superstitions in the islands and at the close the wicked lover goes out to sea and gives himself up to the shark god. - The Moving Picture World, May 17, 1913


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