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Night of 100 Stars (1982)

All-star variety special celebrating the centennial of the Actors' Fund of America.

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Won 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

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All-star variety special celebrating the centennial of the Actors' Fund of America.

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Comedy | Family | Music

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8 March 1982 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Final filmed and final public appearance for Lee Strasberg, who died just four days later, on February 17, 1982. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Entertainment Tonight: Episode #1.123 (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

New York, New York
Written by John Kander and Fred Ebb
Performed by Liza Minnelli
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User Reviews

Fun and kitschy programming as only the 80's could produce
4 August 2003 | by See all my reviews

This was a fun program from back in the last days of three networks when there wasn't much else to watch. The very idea of getting 100 stars together for one non-awards show seemed audacious at the time.

The different stars represented the facets of actors' work: Stage, movies and television. Television actors who could sing (Nancy Dussault, Pam Dawber, and John Schneider) but no one knew they could were put into a mock take on "What's My Line?" Broadway stars belted out songs from the shows which made them big names. And movie actors...well they mostly gave speeches or did bits.

The show is full of skits and walk ons hurried so as to fit 100 stars into such a short time span. At one point they simply had actors of Christopher Reeve's ilk wearing a top hat and tails stroll across stage to hear their names announced!

There was a sequel to this show but nothing could top the pure kitsch quality of the original. They don't make'm like this anymore...and I will leave it up to you as to whether or not that is a good thing.


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