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Jim Carrey To Play Tormented Children’s TV Star In New Showtime Comedy From Michel Gondry

Jim Carrey To Play Tormented Children’s TV Star In New Showtime Comedy From Michel Gondry
Jim Carrey is reuniting with his “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” director Michel Gondry to star in a new half-hour comedy for Showtime. “Kidding,” which has been given a 10-episode order, will represent Carrey’s first series regular role in more than two decades.

“Kidding” stars Carrey as Jeff, also known as beloved children’s TV personality Mr. Pickles. Here’s the logline: “A beacon of kindness and wisdom to America’s impressionable young minds and the parents who grew up with him – [Jeff] also anchors a multimillion dollar branding empire. But when this beloved personality’s family – wife, two sons, sister and father – begins to implode, Jeff finds no fairy tale or fable or puppet will guide him through this crisis, which advances faster than his means to cope. The result: a kind man in a cruel world faces a slow leak of sanity as hilarious as it is heartbreaking.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Jim Carrey To Play Tormented Children’s TV Star In New Showtime Comedy From Michel Gondry

  • Indiewire
Jim Carrey To Play Tormented Children’s TV Star In New Showtime Comedy From Michel Gondry
Jim Carrey is reuniting with his “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” director Michel Gondry to star in a new half-hour comedy for Showtime. “Kidding,” which has been given a 10-episode order, will represent Carrey’s first series regular role in more than two decades.

“Kidding” stars Carrey as Jeff, also known as beloved children’s TV personality Mr. Pickles. Here’s the logline: “A beacon of kindness and wisdom to America’s impressionable young minds and the parents who grew up with him – [Jeff] also anchors a multimillion dollar branding empire. But when this beloved personality’s family – wife, two sons, sister and father – begins to implode, Jeff finds no fairy tale or fable or puppet will guide him through this crisis, which advances faster than his means to cope. The result: a kind man in a cruel world faces a slow leak of sanity as hilarious as it is heartbreaking.
See full article at Indiewire »

Jim Carrey to Star in New Showtime Comedy Series ‘Kidding’

Jim Carrey to Star in New Showtime Comedy Series ‘Kidding’
Jim Carrey will star in a new Showtime comedy series in his first regular television role since his days on the 1990’s sketch show “In Living Color,” Showtime announced Thursday.

The half-hour series is titled “Kidding,” in which Carrey will play Jeff, a.k.a. Mr. Pickles, an icon of children’s television, who also anchors a multimillion dollar branding empire. But when his family begins to implode, Jeff finds no fairy tale or fable or puppet will guide him through this crisis, which advances faster than his means to cope. Showtime has ordered a 10-episode first season.

The role further expands Carrey’s relationship with Showtime, as he currently executive produces the dramedy “I’m Dying Up Here,” which was recently renewed for a second season.

The project will also reunite Carrey with “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” director Michel Gondry, who will direct for “Kidding.” Dave Holstein–a writer and producer on both Showtime
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Michel Gondry and Jon Brion Team Up For Eternally Sunny Yogurt Ad — Watch

Michel Gondry and Jon Brion Team Up For Eternally Sunny Yogurt Ad — Watch
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” director Michel Gondry and composer Jon Brion have teamed up again for a whimsical ad that is all sunshine and no feverish heartache.

The commercial is from Greek yogurt company Chobani, and it’s called “Fruit Symphony.” Short and uplifting, it shows musicians playing fruit instruments as a choir of Chobani employees sing Brion’s arrangement of Burt Bacharach’s “What the World Needs Now.”

Read More: Michel Gondry Literally Delivers Dreams in Charming FedEx Commercial — Watch

The ad opens with a coconut sliced in half acting as a high-hat cymbal, and goes on to show some sort of peach synthesizer and a banana piano. (Bananiano?) As a man rubbing a mango smiles at a drummer tapping an apple, Chobani’s message reads: “Food brings us together.”

Perhaps best known for “Eternal Sunshine,” Gondry also directed “The Science of Sleep” and, more recently, a
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Berlin Golden Bear Winner ‘On Body and Soul’ is a Workplace Romance About Dreams

“On Body and Soul” opens with the tender, lyrical image of a deer and buck wandering across a snow-encrusted landscape. With time, it’s revealed that these affectionate animals represent the shared perspectives of dreamers Endre (Géza Morcsányi), the middle-aged manager of a Hungarian slaughterhouse, and Mária (Alexandra Borbély), his much younger employee. Their inexplicable ability to join together in animal form after hours could easily turn absurd or painfully maudlin in the wrong hands. And it nearly does that, but writer-director Ildikó Enyedi mostly gets away with the outrageous scenario, injecting it with a touching, understated romanticism epitomized by that magisterial opening moment. Despite its otherworldly setup, “On Body and Soul” is grounded in familiar emotions.

Read More: Berlin Film Festival: Golden Bear For Best Film Goes to “On Body and Soul”

Enyedi’s name may not resonate around the world, but she’s been on the scene for quite some time,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘I Do A Movie Like I Want To See A Movie’: Michel Gondry Offers 7 Tips For Making Your Own Cinematic Dreams A Reality

‘I Do A Movie Like I Want To See A Movie’: Michel Gondry Offers 7 Tips For Making Your Own Cinematic Dreams A Reality
Fans of his work may revel in the high-concept surrealism of director Michel Gondry’s filmography, while other audiences not attuned to his style may find it abundantly aimless and self-referential. Either way you look, Gondry’s filmography, music video and commercial entries reflect the work of an undeniably smart, adventurous filmmaker. His latest film “Microbe & Gasoline” reflects a bit of a departure for the 53-year-old director: There are still houses on cars and planes flying backward, but unlike the fantasy intrinsic to films like “The Science of Sleep” or “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” this story involves two young teens (largely drawn from Gondry’s youth) constructing their dreams into reality for themselves.

What does it mean to show these dreams cinematically? How can a director get there? And how is the understated “Microbe & Gasoline” still as much a Michel Gondry movie as he’s ever made?

Last week,
See full article at Indiewire »

Michel Gondry’s ‘Microbe & Gasoline’ Is Refreshingly Low-Key [Review]

There’s almost no limit to the imagination of director Michel Gondry (“Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “The Science of Sleep”), and as the incessantly precious whimsy of 2013’s intolerable “Mood Indigo” made clear, that’s not always a good thing. It’s refreshing then, that for his latest film, “Microbe & Gasoline,” the director tones down […]

The post Michel Gondry’s ‘Microbe & Gasoline’ Is Refreshingly Low-Key [Review] appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Review: ‘Microbe and Gasoline’ Is Michel Gondry At His Least Whimsical

In 2008, the satirical website The Onion published a story entitled “Michel Gondry Entertained For Days By New Cardboard Box,” poking a bit of fun at the French filmmaker’s ability to find whimsy and imagination in the most unexpected of places. That Gondry’s movies revel in the fantastic and often eschew anything resembling the cynical is hardly news, but that he’s continued to invest himself in the creation of those kind of films (save for that brief foray into superhero fare with “The Green Hornet”) is certainly worth pointing out on a regular basis.

Read More: ‘Microbe and Gasoline’: Michel Gondry’s Latest Film Gets Whimsical And Inspiring New Trailer

His latest, “Microbe and Gasoline,” is another example of exactly that. Finally getting a release in the U.S. nearly a year after it opened in France (and ten months since it first played in the States,
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Review: Touched with Fire

Touched with Fire asks whether love between two thirty-something adults with bipolar disorder can be successful, loosely wondering about the intersection of sensuality, realism, and mental illness. It seems interested to extract a rubric explaining the connection between people with mental illness who are creatives. The film meanders through this exploration rather than makes up its mind as a creative drama or a serious character study where we could feel immediate pathos for the couple’s suffering and willfully involve ourselves in their situation (which could be an educational, engrossing filmic experience if well-presented). Contemporary films about mental illness such as Girl, Interrupted and A Beautiful Mind achieve this by stripping away characters’ “faces,” showing them as raw and realistic from the beginning. Disappointingly, this doesn’t happen in Touched with Fire. It takes time before New York City poets Carla (Katie Holmes) and Marco (Luke Kirby) approach identities more recognizably meaningful,
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Immortal images by Anne-Katrin Titze

Jane Birkin on Jacques Rivette: "I went to see Céline et Julie vont en bateau." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Charlotte Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin are being celebrated in New York with 19 films and a series of conversations. After a screening of Agnès Varda's Jane B. Par Agnès V., Birkin spoke about working with Jacques Rivette on L’Amour Par Terre with Geraldine Chaplin, 36 Vues Du Pic Saint Loup, La Belle Noiseuse with Michel Piccoli, and taxidermy.

Claude Miller's L'Effrontée; Michel Gondry's The Science Of Sleep (La Science Des Rêves); Andrew Birkin's The Cement Garden; Yvan Attal's My Wife Is An Actress (Ma Femme Est Une Actrice); Birkin's Boxes (Les Boites); Claude Miller's The Little Thief (La Petite Voleuse); Varda's Kung Fu Master! (Le Petit Amour); Serge Gainsbourg's Charlotte For Ever; Jacques Doillon's The Prodigal Daughter (La Fille Prodigue); Bertrand Tavernier's Daddy Nostalgia
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Daily | “Jane and Charlotte Forever”

"Jane Birkin and Charlotte Gainsbourg are, without question, the most provocative distaff screen-acting dynasty of any era or nation," argues Melissa Anderson in the Voice. The occasion is "Jane and Charlotte Forever," a series running at the Film Society of Lincoln Center from tomorrow through February 7. We're collecting interviews with the two actresses as well as notes on Serge Gainsbourg's Je t’aime moi non plus and Charlotte For Ever; Agnès Varda's Jane B. par Agnès V. and Kung Fu Master!; and Michel Gondry's The Science of Sleep. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Nyff 2015 | Michel Gondry’s Microbe & Gasoline

"There’s almost no limit to the imagination of director Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep), and as the incessantly precious whimsy of last year’s intolerable Mood Indigo made clear, that’s not always a good thing," begins Nick Schager at the Playlist. "It’s refreshing then, that for his latest film, Microbe & Gasoline, the director tones down his usual quirky, 'look-at-me' visual spectacle, for a low-key tale." We're collecting more reviews and we've got the trailer. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Nyff Review: Michel Gondry’s ‘Microbe & Gasoline’

There’s almost no limit to the imagination of director Michel Gondry (“Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “The Science of Sleep”), and as the incessantly precious whimsy of last year’s intolerable “Mood Indigo” made clear, that’s not always a good thing. It’s refreshing then, that for his latest film, “Microbe & Gasoline,” the director tones down his usual quirky, 'look-at-me' visual spectacle, for a low-key tale. Two eighth-graders strike up a fast friendship, and in order to escape their equally unhappy circumstances, they build a makeshift house-car, setting out on a road trip through the rural countryside. A charming coming-of-age saga in which Gondry channels his usual preoccupations through the prism of a Truffaut-esque tale of iconoclasts in search of themselves and their place in the world. For the acclaimed French auteur, less is usually more. Boasting a jaunty score that contributes to its ramshackle, off-the-cuff atmosphere,
See full article at The Playlist »

Just Jim review: “A quirky coming of age dramedy”

Just Jim review: An interesting debut from Roberts and is definitely a director, and actor, to keep an eye on. Just Jim review

Remember the kid from 2010’s Submarine? Well in addition to growing up, Craig Roberts has now turned his hand to writing and directing, as well as acting. The result of his hard labour is this weeks release Just Jim which sees Roberts star alongside Emile Hirsch.

Roberts plays Jim, a very awkward sixth-former with an exaggeration problem; a social outcast who can’t fit in with the in-crowd no matter how hard he tries. Then he meets his new neighbour Dean, an American heavily channelling James Dean, and everything starts to change.

Through his friendship with the ever so slightly unstable Dean, Jim finds himself suddenly more confident and happier. Of course things don’t last and Jim must stop his new friend from taking over everything
See full article at The Hollywood News »

10 filmmakers who went from Indie Darling to Big Budget Blunder

In the wake of Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four, Matthew Lee looks at ten filmmakers who went from Indie Darling to Big Budget Blunder…

Josh Trank’s debut, Chronicle, was a surprise hit of 2012. The film fused the found-footage genre with superhero tropes to create a coming-of-age story that was both fresh and exciting. Trank’s ability to transcend these tired trends and motifs made him an ideal candidate to finally do justice to the Fantastic Four franchise, one that had an unreleased early 90s film, and two poor mid-00s flicks. However, with production problems between Trank and cast members, and no advanced press screening, many pundits were concerned this would be a mess.

The results are in, and it is not only a poor film, but has been described as the worst reviewed Marvel film to-date. That’s not good. Trank responded openly via tweet to this, noting how Fox had – ah,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Nymphomaniac boards the ever growing cast of Independence Day 2

  • JoBlo
The cast of Indepenence Day 2 is growing as THR has reported that Nymphomaniac star Charlotte Gainsbourg is in talks to join the sci-fi action flick. Gainsbourg has appeared in three of Danish director Lars von Trier’s films; Antichrist, Melancholia, and Nymphomaniac, but I’m a bit more familiar with her work in 21 Grams and The Science Of Sleep. Joining the cast of Independence Day 2 would be quite the departure from her usual roles, but everyone deserves to take some...
See full article at JoBlo »

The Dreamers: Valérie Donzelli Completes Casting for “Marguerite et Julien” (aka Abandoned Truffaut Project)

Valérie Donzelli, the actress-turned director who we most recently caught as a supporting player in the garishly dressed Saint Laurent, Bertrand Bonello’s stylized biopic might have found a taste for risky content as cameras are set to lense next week on her fourth feature film. The Cineuropa folks report that Donzelli has completed the casting on Marguerite et Julien, a project that François Truffaut flirted with but ultimately passed on. Completing the cast we find Aurélia Petit (The Science of Sleep), vet thesps Sami Frey and Geraldine Chaplin, reuniting with her fellow Declaration of War‘s Frédéric Pierrot and Bastien Bouillon who join the previously announced duo of Anaïs Demoustier (you can find her in Ozon’s latest, the recently acquired Cohen Media’s The New Girlfriend) and Jérémie Elkaïm (full-time collaborator with Donzelli who we also discovered in Declaration of War). Rectangle ProductionsEdouard Weil (Benoît Jacquot’s
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch trailer for Jon Stewart's directorial debut Rosewater

Watch trailer for Jon Stewart's directorial debut Rosewater
The trailer for Jon Stewart's directorial debut Rosewater chronicles the struggle for freedom of the press in Iran.

Rosewater is based on the true story of journalist Maziar Bahari's detainment in an Iranian jail for more than 100 days.

Bahari is played in the biopic by Gael García Bernal (No, The Science of Sleep), with the movie dramatising the journalist's imprisonment for raising questions about Iran's 2009 presidential election.

Stewart based the screenplay for Rosewater on Bahari and Aimee Molloy's book Then They Came for Me.

The film also includes a score from Academy Award-winning composer Howard Shore.

Rosewater was shot on location in Jordan during Stewart's hiatus from The Daily Show last summer.

Stewart's Rosewater opens on November 7 in the Us.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Mood Indigo movie review: mood disrupted

Delightfully bonkers stop-motion vacuumpunk madness comes to an abrupt halt in this mysteriously truncated version of Michel Gondry’s latest romantic whimsy. I’m “biast” (pro): love Michel Gondry

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

This is not a thing you ever want to hear: “Michel Gondry’s shorter, preferred cut for American audiences.” That was the proud announcement included in a press release about Mood Indigo from a U.S. publicist for the film, and that 90-odd-minute version is the same one I saw at a press screening here in London. Why does Gondry think we English speakers don’t warrant the two-hour-plus version of his whimsical love story? What doesn’t he want us to see? What does he think we can’t handle?

This is what I saw: an hour
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Win a prize bundle from Mood Indigo

To mark the release of Mood Indigo on 1st August, we’ve been given a Prize bundle to give away including an original Mood Indigo poster signed by the Oscar winning Director, Michel Gondry, a rejacketed edition of the Boris Vian original novel for Mood Indigo, DVDs of Paris (with Romain Duris) and Coco before Chanel (with Audrey Tautou).

Based on the cult novel by Boris Vian and directed by Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep), Mood Indigo tells the surreal and poetic tale of Colin (Romain Duris, Populaire, Heartbreaker) and Chloe (Audrey Tautou, Coco before Chanel, Delicacy) and their idyllic love-story. Set in a fantasy version of Paris, their romantic adventure is turned on its head when Chloe falls sick and discovers a water lily growing in her lung…

Please note: This competition is open to UK residents only

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The
See full article at HeyUGuys »
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