In the late 1800's a new addition to law enforcement is evolving. Forensic science is in its infancy and the Wild West will never be the same. Enter Federal Marshal Jared Stone, the product... See full summary »
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Episodes

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1  
2003  
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
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 Marshal Jared Stone (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Detective Larimer Finch / ... (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Katie Owen (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Chipper Dunn (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Mayor Smith (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Luci Prescott (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Jake Freeman (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Vic Simmons (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Steward Harrison (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Will Johnston (9 episodes, 2003)
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 Ralph James / ... (8 episodes, 2003)
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 Twyla Gentry (7 episodes, 2003)
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Storyline

In the late 1800's a new addition to law enforcement is evolving. Forensic science is in its infancy and the Wild West will never be the same. Enter Federal Marshal Jared Stone, the product of the Old West who has the smarts to know that the times are changing and he has to change with them. With ex-Pinkerton Agent Larimer Finch and local mortician Katie Owen, they make up Silver City, CO's., newest crime fighting team. Written by B. Woolf

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Taglines:

Every crime leaves a trail.

Genres:

Western | Action | Crime | Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

30 July 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

O eirinopoios  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Tom Berenger and Fay Masterson appeared in two other Westerns together, _Avenging Angel, The (1995)_ and _Johnson County War (2002)_. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Takes Both Hands
23 April 2013 | by (Mocksville, NC) – See all my reviews

It takes both hands to describe this innovative Western TV series (though owing more than a little to Hec Ramsey IMHO) that initially intrigued and then caused me to gradually lose interest and stop watching.

On the one hand it was cleverly written and very well acted, especially by Tom Berenger.

On the other hand it was so politically correct that I could guess who the villain was, usually in the first 15 minutes, just by applying the "logic" of political correctness: (The villain can never be a member of any approved minority so it can never be an Indian or a black or a Chinese person or a female or a poor and downtrodden person, etc., and the minute there's a rich, prejudiced, white male on the suspect list, "At ease, Mounties, we've got our man."

I think I guessed wrong only once, and in that episode the villain turned out to be a rich, prejudiced, white female.


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