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Pull for the Shore, Sailor! (1911)

"The Madonna of the Tubs," as Elizabeth Stuart Phelps has called her principal character, is simply a washerwoman who lives on the outskirts of a fishing village with her husband and ... See full summary »
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Ellen Jane - a Laundress
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Henry - Ellen Jane's Husband
Edna May Weick ...
Ellen & Henry's Little Girl
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The City Lady
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Undetermined Role (unconfirmed)
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The Little Lame Boy
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Storyline

"The Madonna of the Tubs," as Elizabeth Stuart Phelps has called her principal character, is simply a washerwoman who lives on the outskirts of a fishing village with her husband and children. All goes well with the little family until Henry left on a fishing voyage. The night before he was induced by his comrades to take a drink. He was not in the habit of doing so, but it was parting, and so he yielded to their wishes; as usual, one glass led to another. Finally be arrived home, his head in a muddle, mad at himself and all the world. A quarrel with his wife ensued and he left the home in anger. He had scarcely gone before the little mother realized what it meant, and out in the night she called for him, but he heard her not and the ship sailed away. Then the story pictures the tragedy of the deep, the terrible fog that calls so many victims home. We see two fishermen in their little dory out in the open sea. Then the quiet, solemn fog steals around them and blots out everything. ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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Release Date:

1 December 1911 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Suggested by Elizabeth Stewart Phelps's "The Madonna of the Tubs."
3 June 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Miss Laura Sawyer plays very effectively the part of the sailor's wife in this heart-touching picture, which was suggested by Elizabeth Stewart Phelps's "The Madonna of the Tubs." She is also ably supported. It is a seaside story of fisherfolk. There are some delightful pictures of a Maine harbor and of the sea, although it cannot be said that the scenes in which the dory is shown adrift are all quite as effective as possible; they are good, however. The only other criticism is that the first scene might have been more happily placed a bit later in the picture: it prepared us for one of the lesser threads of the story. The sailor, after a causeless quarrel, left for a fishing trip without saying goodbye to his wife. In a fog his dory was separated from the ship and he was reported as dead. It was summer when he went out; it is Christmas when he reaches home. His coming is unexpected and brings great joy. It is a well designed picture and Miss Sawyer's acting makes it very effective. - The Moving Picture World, December 16, 1911


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