In the first scene we see a group of children at a window waiting for the arrival of their father. Following this we learn that the little family lacks a mother. The next scene brings us to... See full summary »

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Cast

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The Widower
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One of the Children
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One of the Children
Edna May Weick ...
One of the Children
Elizabeth Miller ...
The Other Woman
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Storyline

In the first scene we see a group of children at a window waiting for the arrival of their father. Following this we learn that the little family lacks a mother. The next scene brings us to a theater-box party. The father of the little family meets another woman. It soon becomes evident that he intends to marry again and at last he brings this other woman to the house. While he is present, she seems to be fond of the children, but once he is out of the room we see that her fondness is hardly skin-deep. Soon the mother's picture is removed from over the fireplace and evidently the new wedding will take place. Little Margaret, taking care of the children, finds them hard to amuse one day, and going up into the garret, finds some old clothes, in which they all dress. By chance she puts on the very costume which was used when her mother posed for the big portrait, now absent from its place over the mantel, and so it happens that when the father comes home at night, there comes down the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Family | Short

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Release Date:

26 December 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

Released as a split reel along with Modern Weapons for Fighting Fires, New York City (1911). See more »

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User Reviews

The best moving pictures are on a higher plane artistically than the plays we see on Broadway
12 June 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Simple and unaffected acting on the part of the whole cast tells, in this picture, a human story with the heart-touching truth and beauty that we look for in the best art. As the editor of "The Independent" has recently pointed out, and as the Moving Picture World has reiterated, the best moving pictures are on a higher plane artistically than the plays we see on Broadway. This picture is a perfect illustration of the fact that, for human realism and the presentation of simple stories of the lives people live, the motion picture is better than any other form of art; it is the perfect medium. It skillfully chooses and sets before us certain moments, falling within the limits in this case of a few days, in the life of a widower who has three children. He has fallen in love again and the outlook isn't any too bright for the children; the spectator is a little anxious. A painting of the children's mother is hanging over the fireplace in a very home-like looking room. The three children, in a playful moment, "dress up," just for sport. The oldest daughter puts on the hat and dress her mother wore when sitting for her portrait. She looks just like her mother. The sight of her is too much for the father; he turns away from the new sweetheart. - The Moving Picture World, January 6, 1912


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