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The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (2004)

Not Rated | | Biography, Comedy, Drama | 1 October 2004 (UK)
The feature adaptation of Roger Lewis' book about the actor best remembered as Inspector Clouseau in the Pink Panther movies.

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Writers:

(book), (teleplay) | 1 more credit »
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Won 2 Golden Globes. Another 29 wins & 34 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Anne Sellers
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Peg Sellers
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Bill Sellers
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Dennis Selinger
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Casting Agent
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Ted Levy
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Dr. Lyle Wexler
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Spike Milligan (as Edward Tudor Pole)
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Storyline

The professional and personal life of actor and comedian Peter Sellers was a turbulent one. His early movie fame was based primarily on his comic characterizations, often of bumbling and foreign-accented persons, characters which he embodied. As his movie fame rose, he began to lose his own personal identity to his movie characters, leading to self-doubt of himself as a person and a constant need for reassurance and acceptance of his work. This self-doubt manifested itself in fits of anger and what was deemed as arrogance by many. In turn, his personal relationships began to deteriorate as his characterizations were continually used to mask his problems. His first wife, Anne Howe, left/divorced him and his relationships with his parents and children became increasingly distant. His relationship with his second wife, Swedish actress Britt Ekland, was based on this mask. In his later life, he tried to rediscover himself and his career with what would become his penultimate film role, ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Never judge a man by his cover. See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

1 October 2004 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

A Vida e Morte de Peter Sellers  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$211,647 (Australia) (27 August 2004)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Geoffrey Rush initially turned down the film, feeling he didn't possess the mental capacity to play Peter Sellers. However, after finishing Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003), he changed his mind, and decided to do the film, feeling that the previous film had put him in the right mindset. See more »

Goofs

When Sellers finds out (via the newspaper) that Britt Ekland is arriving in London it is the early 1960s, yet on the wall of his room at the start of the scene is the UK film poster for his film Undercovers Hero. See more »

Quotes

Dennis Selinger: Blake Edwards is the hottest director in Hollywood right now. Days of Wine and Roses, Breakfast at Tiffany's. He can get anyone he wants. And, Peter, he wants you. United Artists are putting a lot of weight behind this picture. It's going to get very wide, very international release. Now, you may be a big star in Britain, love, but the folks in Duluth have never heard of you.
Peter Sellers: Well, we're even. I've never heard of Duluth.
Dennis Selinger: [making a "money" gesture with his fingers] In the United States.
Peter Sellers: Oh... ...
See more »

Crazy Credits

The frame freezes and the end credits start. After some informations about the last part of life of Peter Sellers have scrolled up the screen, the credits stop and the camera suddenly pulls back, revealing Geoffrey Rush watching the end titles sitting in front of a monitor on a studio set. He turns toward the camera, waves, gets up, leaves the set and walks to a trailer. The camera tries to follow him inside, but he turns and says "You can't come in here". The door closes, and the camera zooms in on the sign with the name "Peter Sellers". The film again fades to black and we see the rest of the end credits. See more »

Connections

References Never Let Go (1960) See more »

Soundtracks

The Blue Danube Waltz
Written by Johann Strauss
Performed by The London Metropolitan Orchestra
Arranged and conducted by James Seymour Brett
Heard during fantasy sequence
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User Reviews

My brief review of the film
30 May 2005 | by (Perth, Australia) – See all my reviews

Geoffrey Rush does a great Peter Sellers impersonation, and Emily Watson shines as his wife, but otherwise the film is a little hard to recommend. The events all seem a bit fragmented, the frantic editing and camera-work subtract, and nothing much is gained by the over-exposure either. But the narration of the film is where I feel it really sinks, with awkward bits of talking to the audience and surreal sequences that appear like they have just been thrown in to make it more attractive to the eye. Also, viewers should be cautioned that the only thing that Stanley Tucci has in common with his character, Stanley Kubrick, is the same first name. Still, the film has some interesting elements, such as the insight into film-making and the performances, as well as some genuinely funny parts… it is reasonably well made, but not brilliant.


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