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The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (2004)

Not Rated | | Biography, Comedy, Drama | 1 October 2004 (UK)
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The feature adaptation of Roger Lewis' book about the actor best remembered as Inspector Clouseau in the Pink Panther movies.



(book), (teleplay) | 1 more credit »
Won 2 Golden Globes. Another 29 wins & 34 nominations. See more awards »





Cast overview, first billed only:
Bill Sellers
Sophia Loren
Maurice Woodruff
Casting Agent
Ted Levy
Dr. Lyle Wexler
Spike Milligan (as Edward Tudor Pole)
Harry Secombe


The professional and personal life of actor and comedian Peter Sellers was a turbulent one. His early movie fame was based primarily on his comic characterizations, often of bumbling and foreign-accented persons, characters which he embodied. As his movie fame rose, he began to lose his own personal identity to his movie characters, leading to self-doubt of himself as a person and a constant need for reassurance and acceptance of his work. This self-doubt manifested itself in fits of anger and what was deemed as arrogance by many. In turn, his personal relationships began to deteriorate as his characterizations were continually used to mask his problems. His first wife, Anne Howe, left/divorced him and his relationships with his parents and children became increasingly distant. His relationship with his second wife, Swedish actress Britt Ekland, was based on this mask. In his later life, he tried to rediscover himself and his career with what would become his penultimate film role, ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


I love me...I love me not. See more »


Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:






Release Date:

1 October 2004 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

A Vida e Morte de Peter Sellers  »


Box Office

Opening Weekend:

£125,748 (United Kingdom), 1 October 2004, Limited Release
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs


Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?


The characters who come to haunt Peter Sellers in his dream (while he is being resuscitated in the hospital) are Mr. Robinson (The Ladykillers (1955)), Grand Duchess Gloriana XII (The Mouse That Roared (1959)), Aldo Vanucci (After the Fox (1966)), Lionel Meadows (Never Let Go (1960)), President Merkin Muffley and Dr. Strangelove (Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)), and Inspector Jacques Clouseau (Pink Panther series). The voice of Fred Kite (I'm All Right Jack (1959)) is also heard, but the character does not appear. See more »


Other motor vehicle anachronisms: (1) Sellers and his family arrive at their new house in a Jaguar S-Type; this model was released in 1963, yet this scene is set several years previously in 1960. (2) Sellers' red Bentley is towed away by a 1963 Shelvoke & Drewry TZ truck. This scene is set during the making of The Millionairess. (3) When Sellers has sex with Sophia Loren's stand-in in a Rolls-Royce, the camera moves across some parked cars including a Wolseley 6/110, which was released in 1961; this scene is set in 1960. (4) During the filming of Casino Royale the director chases after Sellers in a Mercedes W115, which was released in 1968. (5) When Sellers rushes Britt to the hospital to give birth to their daughter Victoria (who was born in 1965) he pulls out in front of a 1966 Ford Zephyr MkIV. (6) In the scene where Sellers is talking to Anne about wanting to make Being There, a Series III Jaguar XJ is visible in the background, this wasn't released until late 1979. Also, this scene is set prior to filming of "Being There", which began in January 1979. See more »


[At Peter's wedding to the Swedish starlet Britt Ekland]
Peg Sellers: You've only known that bleedin' Nazi for 3 weeks.
Peter Sellers: Peg, I couldn't be happier.
Peg Sellers: Why are you making the same mistake all over again?
Peter Sellers: Because, my love, they won't let me marry you.
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Crazy Credits

The frame freezes and the end credits start. After some informations about the last part of life of Peter Sellers have scrolled up the screen, the credits stop and the camera suddenly pulls back, revealing Geoffrey Rush watching the end titles sitting in front of a monitor on a studio set. He turns toward the camera, waves, gets up, leaves the set and walks to a trailer. The camera tries to follow him inside, but he turns and says "You can't come in here". The door closes, and the camera zooms in on the sign with the name "Peter Sellers". The film again fades to black and we see the rest of the end credits. See more »


References What's New Pussycat (1965) See more »


You Make Me Feel So Young
Written by Mack Gordon & Josef Myrow
Performed by Lance Ellington
Heard during marriage proposal to Britt
Arranged and conducted by James Seymour Brett
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User Reviews

Lows and Lowers among Highs and Highers
30 August 2005 | by See all my reviews

Biopics are a devilish thing. Is as if the subject himself boycotted the operation from beyond the grave. The ultimate breach of privacy, isn't it? One feels like a voyeur, compelled and revolted at the same time. Goeffrey Rush's brilliant portrayal makes things even worse, I mean better, no I meant worse. A life of massive ups and downs for public consumption. Peter Sellers with a Cary Grant complex and a talent bigger than himself told in bits and pieces. To the ones who know about Sellers is a rather frustrating experience. Dr.Strangelove yes but not Lolita? The relationship with Blake Edwards deserves a movie of its own. The first massive heart attack was during Billy Wilder's "Kiss Me Stupid" but there is no mention of that. I know that to compress such a life without a structure within a two hour film it's an impossible task so what we're left with is a courageous attempt at tell us the sickly existence of one the greatest that ever was, a superlative performance by Goeffrey Rush, an astonishing Charlize Theron as Britt Eckland and very little else. I suppose that should be enough. Yes, it should, shouldn't it?

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