"Kid" Bolton, having made a stake of about fifty thousand dollars in the Klondike, decides to go back to the States and is given a rousing send-off by the boys. In Seattle he purchases new ... See full summary »

Writer:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Harold M. Shaw ...
Kid Bolton
Reeva Greenwood ...
Ollie - the Stenographer
...
Ollie's Father
...
A Smooth Article
...
A Confederate
...
A Confederate
Edit

Storyline

"Kid" Bolton, having made a stake of about fifty thousand dollars in the Klondike, decides to go back to the States and is given a rousing send-off by the boys. In Seattle he purchases new clothes, a silk hat and jewelry, and manages to become acquainted with a pretty stenographer, Ollie, at the hotel. He falls in love with her and shortly afterward proposes, only to be rejected. But he bobs up serenely and proposes again, this time dictating his proposal to Ollie, who writes it for him and charges him a twenty-five cent fee. Upon receiving this unique offer, she decides to accept him, but only on condition that he obtains her father's consent. This is quite satisfactory to the "Kid," and he starts for Chicago to visit his future father-in-law. On the train he confides to a fellow passenger that he has made a fortune in the Klondike, whereupon the stranger decides to try to get some easy money from him. He invites him to a dinner, where he introduces him to two young women, his ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Comedy

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 October 1911 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

There is no scenery in it
12 May 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is a character comedy and not a formal Western. There is no scenery in it; it is a hotel lobby, parlor car, automobile and city picture, and relates the comic experiences of a breezy young man who had made a big roll of greenbacks and a bank account of startling size. He fell in love with a pretty hotel stenographer who was possessed of originality and humor. How he fell in love, scraped acquaintance, proposed and was sent to Chicago to ask Papa is told freshly and is very amusing, as are his adventures on the Pullman. A "sharp" traveler learned of his roll and tried to get it. This sharper rapped, in telegraph alphabet, a message on a glass to the girls who were his accomplices. The letters jumped up on the wall and spelled out, "He has a big roll; it's easy," but the kid understood. The way Papa was compelled to give consent to the wedding is not new, but serves to end the comedy. The fun comes almost wholly from the Kid, who does very well. The stenographer was well chosen and does creditably. It is a good, amusing comedy. - The Moving Picture World, November 4, 1911


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?