The film starts by showing a young married couple who laughed at the idea of old age. Several years later, the woman's hair is decidedly touched with gray. This is also apparent of the ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Mabel Trunnelle
Robert Brower
William Bechtel ...
The Artist
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Ben F. Wilson
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Storyline

The film starts by showing a young married couple who laughed at the idea of old age. Several years later, the woman's hair is decidedly touched with gray. This is also apparent of the man's hair. A passing artist asks permission to paint her portrait. She points to the one hanging on the wall, which is a reproduction of herself in her younger days. The artist indicates that she has changed immensely since then, which so touches her, that she sends the artist away. Placing a mirror in front of her, she compares its reflection with that portrait of herself in her younger days. She perceives a decided change. The artist paints her portrait, and when it is finished she shows it to her husband, who taking her in his arms, tells her "she has never older grown." Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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12 April 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Film debut of Ben F. Wilson (billed as "Benjamin Wilson"). See more »

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More like a leaf from actual experience than a picture
10 January 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Everybody probably recognizes the title of the old song which has been popular for many years, and almost everybody understands its sentiment. The Edison players have reproduced it in a way to make it peculiarly attractive. No one cares to grow old, and when the fact of age is impressed upon anyone as forcibly as it was upon the woman here represented, the pain is often tragic. In that respect the film follows life closely and unquestionably emphasizes very natural sentiments. Indeed, the picture is drawn so true to life that it appears more like a leaf from actual experience than a picture. With the musicians following each of the pictures with the well known melody varying expression to suit, and making it an unconscious undertone to the story, the closing scenes, when the husband declares that she "has never older grown," causes a suspicious moisture under the eyelids. All of middle age will enjoy this picture because it will mean much to them. Youth also will enjoy it; for its sentiment will touch all. It will rank as one of the best, if not the very best of the week. - The Moving Picture World, April 29, 1911


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