Adrian De Mauprat, a gallant soldier of fortune, meets and falls desperately in love with the Cardinal's ward, Julie, who in turn shows that his attentions are not unwelcome. Owling to the ... See full summary »
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Juliet - Richelieu's Ward
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Adrian De Mauprat
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Adrian De Mauprat, a gallant soldier of fortune, meets and falls desperately in love with the Cardinal's ward, Julie, who in turn shows that his attentions are not unwelcome. Owling to the numerous duels being fought in Paris, the Cardinal is obliged to issue an edict forbidding dueling and making death the penalty if the edict is disregarded. De Mauprat enters a tavern and engages in a dice game with a stranger and soon learns that the stranger is a sharp and catches him cheating. He throws his wine into the cheat's face and in a moment both rapiers are drawn. In spite of the interference of friends they fight their duel and De Mauprat runs his men through. No sooner has this happened than the Cardinal appears with his guard and placed De Mauprat under arrest. The Cardinal is pondering whether to enforce the penalty of the edict when his ward, having seen De Maupret under arrest, demands an explanation. When told that his life is forfeited she betrays and finally confesses her love ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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6 June 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Seems like a waste of energy
8 February 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Twice within a little more than a year Bulwer Lytton's drama "Richelieu" has been produced in moving pictures. The first attempt was by the Vitagraph Company. The Edison version follows the drama less closely and less clearly. It is both free and hasty. A tendency to "play up" to well-known paintings is to be commended. The first few scenes prepared the spectator for some striking finales. Indeed, the settings the spectator for some striking finales. Indeed, the settings were most probably taken from the famous picture "L'Eminence Grisé." The cheap artificial scenery in the dueling scene was quite an anti-climax. The sudden violence of the cardinal's niece upon the return of the lover, who has succeeded in securing the much-desired proof of a conspiracy against the king, is hard to understand. There seems to be nothing in the drama to warrant it. It is suggested with all due deference that the drama itself, I mean Bulwer Lytton's work, is but ordinary and is fully exhausted after one competent company has given it a representation in film; a second attempt, unless it is a very decided improvement, seems like a waste of energy. - The Moving Picture World, June 17, 1911


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