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1-20 of 26 items from 2004   « Prev | Next »


Gruffudd Leads Bond Race

24 November 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Welsh actor Ioan Gruffudd is leading the way to play the next James Bond - ahead of Ewan McGregor and Hugh Jackman. The King Arthur star is said to possess "all the credentials" to take over from Pierce Brosnan as the next 007 in the secret spy films. A source says, "Ioan is the only actor being considered as the next Bond at the moment. He has all the credentials to play Bond and, unlike most of the other candidates mentioned, he's relatively unknown. The producers know Ioan is going to be a big star with or without Bond. It's just a matter of whether he wants to take on such a huge role and the early indications are that he does." »

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Scott's Mother Slams Bond Rumors

20 September 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Scottish actor Dougray Scott's mother has slammed reports her son is to play the next James Bond. The To Kill A King hunk, 38, was rumored to have beaten King Arthur star Clive Owen and Hulk actor Eric Bana to replace Pierce Brosnan in the 23rd Bond movie, after discussions with producer Barbara Broccoli. But Scott's mother, Elma Scott, says, "My other son David contacted him about the latest reports and he said it's not true. He has other commitments, so there is certainly nothing to say at the moment." Scott has just announced plans to do a film titled The Cone Gatherer, scheduled for release next year, in which he plays an objector to the Second World War who is sent to work on a country estate in Scotland. »

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Mixed bag takes over as summer season exhausts

7 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With kids heading back to school and vacationers returning to normal work routines, the overseas boxoffice began to settle down as a batch of new entries attracted degrees of attention in a fragmented marketplace. The Terminal led the charge in the United Kingdom, Italy, Korea and Taiwan; The Village was No. 1 in Australia, Brazil, Switzerland, Hong Kong and Argentina; Garfield purred its way to the top in Spain; King Arthur overwhelmed Greece; The Chronicles of Riddick headed the boxoffice chart in Germany; Van Helsing took command in Japan; Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid hit the mark in the Philippines and Singapore; and a local film, 5x2 calculated to No. 1 in France. Top weekend honors went to M. Night Shyamalan's The Village, which took in an estimated $9.5 million from 2,052 screens in 23 countries, raising its international cume to $45 million. Village captured the No. 1 position in all seven of its new openings, according to distributor Buena Vista International, with Australia providing $2.2 million from 200, said to be 40% better that Shyamalan's Unbreakable; Brazil, $750,000 from 250; Switzerland, $655,000 from 80; and Hong Kong, $421,000 from 20. »

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Mixed bag takes over as summer season exhausts

7 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With kids heading back to school and vacationers returning to normal work routines, the overseas boxoffice began to settle down as a batch of new entries attracted degrees of attention in a fragmented marketplace. The Terminal led the charge in the United Kingdom, Italy, Korea and Taiwan; The Village was No. 1 in Australia, Brazil, Switzerland, Hong Kong and Argentina; Garfield purred its way to the top in Spain; King Arthur overwhelmed Greece; The Chronicles of Riddick headed the boxoffice chart in Germany; Van Helsing took command in Japan; Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid hit the mark in the Philippines and Singapore; and a local film, 5x2 calculated to No. 1 in France. Top weekend honors went to M. Night Shyamalan's The Village, which took in an estimated $9.5 million from 2,052 screens in 23 countries, raising its international cume to $45 million. Village captured the No. 1 position in all seven of its new openings, according to distributor Buena Vista International, with Australia providing $2.2 million from 200, said to be 40% better that Shyamalan's Unbreakable; Brazil, $750,000 from 250; Switzerland, $655,000 from 80; and Hong Kong, $421,000 from 20. »

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BVI tops $1 billion for 10th straight year

1 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Buena Vista International, the international theatrical distribution arm of the Walt Disney Co., set an industry record Tuesday by topping $1 billion in international boxoffice revenue for its 10th consecutive year. The unprecedented result was announced by BVI president Mark Zoradi, who said that this year's billion-dollar milestone was achieved earlier in the calendar year than ever before. Since 1995, BVI -- which handles titles internationally from Touchstone Pictures and Walt Disney Pictures as well as part of Miramax's slate and some independent pickups -- has amassed a stunning cumulative international boxoffice total of $12.1 billion, which it said is more than any other studio in the overseas sector over that period of time. Thirty-six films have notched more than $100 million during that period. Zoradi said this year's result was achieved with Jerry Bruckheimer's King Arthur joining the $100 million club in the past few days. »

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Hollywood fest fetes Foxx, Knightley

1 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Hollywood Film Festival has tapped Jamie Foxx, Keira Knightley and Shrek 2 to receive top awards at next month's fest. The duo will receive their trophies during the Hollywood Awards Gala ceremony Oct. 18 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. Foxx, who is coming off his starring turn opposite Tom Cruise in Michael Mann's Collateral for DreamWorks and preparing for the release of the biopic Ray for Universal Pictures, will receive the male Hollywood Breakthrough Award. King Arthur star Keira Knightley will receive the female Hollywood Breakthrough Award. DreamWorks' Shrek 2 -- the highest-grossing film of the year -- will receive the Hollywood Animation Award. »

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BVI tops $1 billion for 10th straight year

1 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Buena Vista International, the international theatrical distribution arm of the Walt Disney Co., set an industry record Tuesday by topping $1 billion in international boxoffice revenue for its 10th consecutive year. The unprecedented result was announced by BVI president Mark Zoradi, who said that this year's billion-dollar milestone was achieved earlier in the calendar year than ever before. Since 1995, BVI -- which handles titles internationally from Touchstone Pictures and Walt Disney Pictures as well as part of Miramax's slate and some independent pickups -- has amassed a stunning cumulative international boxoffice total of $12.1 billion, which it said is more than any other studio in the overseas sector over that period of time. Thirty-six films have notched more than $100 million during that period. Zoradi said this year's result was achieved with Jerry Bruckheimer's King Arthur joining the $100 million club in the past few days. »

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'Village' No. 1 overseas in waning days of summer

31 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

As the tentpoles of summer cooled down, a glut of new product entered the overseas market as the major studios sought to capture the waning days of the vacation period in one of the most competitive weekends of the year. In a domino effect, new entries around the world knocked down the previous weekend's boxoffice leader in scattered territories, keeping up the big-opening, big-decline pattern of new openings in recent weeks. A weekend highlight witnessed King Arthur, a domestic dud at about $50 million, soar past the $100 million mark ($107.4 million) and play a distinctive role in helping offshore distributor Buena Vista International hit $1 billion at the overseas boxoffice for an unprecedented 10th consecutive year. A striking development over the weekend -- Chinese films were the boxoffice lions in North America and Japan -- clearly aroused the attention of the international film industry. Lovers (aka House of Flying Daggers), released by Warner Entertainment Japan, took the top spot in Japan with $3.6 million, and Hero, under the wing of Miramax, conquered the domestic market with an estimated $17.8 million. »

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It took a 'Village' to beat 'Bourne'

23 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Buena Vista International proved they had nothing to be afraid of this weekend when The Village proved its global mettle. The M. Night Shyamalan thriller broke the suspense for BVI, opening No. 1 in the United Kingdom with an estimated $5.5 million, well ahead of its nearest competitor, The Bourne Supremacy. The Village also took $5.96 million in France, bumping the international cume to $11.9 million. Buena Vista's other major release, King Arthur, continues to surprise in international boxoffice terms, as it was once again the No. 1 picture internationally this weekend with an estimated $12.5 million and a cume of $92 million. The drama took about $3.8 million in its opening in Germany, the first to knock local favorite (T)Raumshciff Surprise from the top spot. King Arthur held the No. 1 position in Spain ($1.7 million, off 38%) and Argentina ($240,000, off 30%). »

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It took a 'Village' to beat 'Bourne'

22 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Buena Vista International proved they had nothing to be afraid of this weekend when The Village proved its global mettle. The M. Night Shyamalan thriller broke the suspense for BVI, opening No. 1 in the United Kingdom with an estimated $5.5 million, well ahead of its nearest competitor, The Bourne Supremacy. The Village also took $5.96 million in France, bumping the international cume to $11.9 million. Buena Vista's other major release, King Arthur, continues to surprise in international boxoffice terms, as it was once again the No. 1 picture internationally this weekend with an estimated $12.5 million and a cume of $92 million. The drama took about $3.8 million in its opening in Germany, the first to knock local favorite "(T)Raumshciff Surprise" from the top spot. King Arthur held the No. 1 position in Spain ($1.7 million, off 38%) and Argentina ($240,000, off 30%). »

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It took a 'Village' to beat 'Bourne'

22 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Buena Vista International proved they had nothing to be afraid of this weekend when The Village proved its global mettle. The M. Night Shyamalan thriller broke the suspense for BVI, opening No. 1 in the United Kingdom with an estimated $5.5 million, well ahead of its nearest competitor, The Bourne Supremacy. The Village also took $5.96 million in France, bumping the international cume to $11.9 million. Buena Vista's other major release, King Arthur, continues to surprise in international boxoffice terms, as it was once again the No. 1 picture internationally this weekend with an estimated $12.5 million and a cume of $92 million. The drama took about $3.8 million in its opening in Germany, the first to knock local favorite (T)Raumshciff Surprise from the top spot. King Arthur held the No. 1 position in Spain ($1.7 million, off 38%) and Argentina ($240,000, off 30%). »

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Holdovers, new entries enjoy strong o'seas b.o.

17 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

A combination of better weather and a trickle of returning vacationers -- with the Olympic Games showing little immediate effect on the boxoffice -- saw overseas moviegoers, especially in Europe, turn out solidly to see seasoned summer holdovers as well as new entries leisurely moving into the market. Films in release in Japan also enjoyed the benefits of the Oban holiday. 20th Century Fox's I, Robot passed the $100 million benchmark at its third weekend of offshore release, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban became the 10th film in industry history to exceed $500 million at the overseas boxoffice, King Arthur kept making up for its domestic disappointment, Spider-Man 2 showed increases in 10 holdover territories and Shrek 2 continued to set records for an animated film. Exhibiting promise in early dates were The Bourne Supremacy, Alien vs. Predator, Collateral and The Village as they ventured slowly into a crowded marketplace. »

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The Door in the Floor

9 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Adapting John Irving novels to the screen is a tricky bit of business.

When the elements come together successfully, the results can take the generally pleasing forms of The World According to Garp and The Cider House Rules (for which Irving himself handled screenplay honors).

When they don't, you're stuck with the lumpy Hotel New Hampshire or the treacly Simon Birch, which was loosely based on Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany.

Breaking the tie, The Door in the Floor -- taking its cue from the first part of Irving's A Widow for One Year -- falls satisfyingly into the plus category.

A tragicomic rumination on life and death and love and sex (but not necessarily in that order), the production is graced by bold performances, lyrical visuals and, most notably, Irving's own words, which have made the transition quite intact thanks to a faithful but still filmic adaptation by writer-director Tod Williams.

With its tragic emotional underpinnings and complex characters, the Focus Features release would have seemed more at home in the fall release schedule rather than taking on potential blockbusters like I, Robot and King Arthur, but the counterprogramming gambit could work in the picture's favor, giving it a neat jump on all those upcoming awards hopefuls.

As with the earlier section of Irving's 576-page novel, Door chronicles a fateful summer in the splintering lives of an East Hampton couple still struggling to cope with the tragic deaths of their two sons.

While free-spirited Ted Cole (a terrific Jeff Bridges), a successful children's author and illustrator, has seemingly moved on from the mourning process by indulging his weakness for infidelity, his wife, Marion (Kim Basinger), remains in a troubling state of withdrawal.

The pallor over their seaside household has forced their 4-year-old daughter, Ruth (Elle Fanning, Dakota's equally capable little sister), to grow up fast.

But a coastal disturbance soon arrives in the form of Eddie O'Hare (Jon Foster), a young man who's ostensibly hired on as Ted's intern but quickly develops a major crush on Marion. Much to his surprise, his feverish sexual yearning is reciprocated, though their steamy affair doesn't exactly lead to a tidy emotional recovery for the damaged family unit.

Williams, who made his feature debut with "The Adventures of Sebastian Cole" and is working on a remake of To Have and Have Not for Benicio Del Toro, does a careful job of extracting and reshaping the Irving material, never shying away from the book's more overtly sexual elements, without detracting from the film's own separate identity.

Key to that success is a strong ensemble playing flawed characters that essentially dare the audience to like them.

The fundamentally likable Bridges gamely pushes all that goodwill to the far edge as the unorthodox Ted, logging one of his best performances in the process.

Basinger, meanwhile, who shared the screen with Bridges in Robert Benton's Nadine, really immerses herself into her character's complex layers with similarly impressive results.

Also doing gutsy work is Mimi Rogers, who has been given very little to hide behind as the needy, hot-blooded object of Bridges' daytime affections.

Behind the camera, cinematographer Terry Stacey (American Splendor) is responsible for some truly lovely compositions, movingly underscored by Marcelo Zarvos' eloquent music.

The Door in the Floor

Focus Features

Focus Features and Revere Pictures present a This Is That production

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Tod Williams

Based on the novel A Widow for One Year by: John Irving

Producers: Ted Hope, Anne Carey, Michael Corrente

Executive producers: Roger Marino, Amy J. Kaufman

Director of photography: Terry Stacey

Production designer: Therese DePrez

Editor: Affonso Goncalves

Costume designer: Eric Daman

Music: Marcelo Zarvos

Cast:

Ted Cole: Jeff Bridges

Marion Cole: Kim Basinger

Eddie O'Hare: Jon Foster

Eleanor Vaughn: Mimi Rogers

Ruth Cole: Elle Fanning

Alice: Bijou Phillips

Eduardo Gomez: Louis Arcella

MPAA rating R

Running time -- 111 minutes »

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King Arthur

9 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Hollywood has refined and redefined the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table so many times over the generations that one would imagine this war horse craves retirement from the world of remakes. Then along comes King Arthur to completely revitalize the legend. Like Spider-Man 2, this is a smart action movie, allowing its impressive sets, costumes, effects and battles to serve as handmaidens to story and character. Screenwriter David Franzoni supplies a much more historically plausible tale than previous forays into Camelot, while director Antoine Fuqua brings the gritty naturalism of Training Day to this story of men -- and one woman -- at war.

The film should attract a wide demographic, for despite male orientation there is enough of the romance and legend of Arthur to interest women of all ages. A PG-13 rating positions King Arthur to be the most successful Arthurian film at the boxoffice yet.

The Jerry Bruckheimer production plunges us into an early Dark Ages of furious violence. Battles are fought with vastly different weaponry -- highly accurate archery, heavy swords and spears, balls of fire, axes, shields, hefty body armor and body-paint camouflage. It's a savage, intolerant time where religion is a tool for subjugation, yet concepts of justice and heroism do flourish.

Franzoni's historical revisionism moves the tale back to 452 A.D. The Roman Empire is waning. Barbarians threaten frontier outposts, successfully skirmishing against Roman troops eager to return home and the Empire's mercenary cavalry made up of Samaritan warriors, who came from the area now know as the republic of Georgia. One such unit in Britain fights under the command of Roman officer Lucius Artorius Castus, or Arthur (Clive Owen).

These knights, a sort of Dirty Half-Dozen, include the level-headed Lancelot (Ioan Gruffudd), strongman/family man Bors (Ray Winstone), young and passionate Galahad (Hugh Dancy), stolid traditionalist Dagonet (Ray Stevenson), inveterate fighter Gawain (Joel Edgerton) and moody and elusive Tristan (Mads Mikkelsen), whose main companion is a hawk.

On the day the knights' 15 years of service to Rome supposedly expires, the group of weary fighters is ordered on a virtual suicide mission. They must journey north of Hadrian's wall, the great dividing line that protects southern Britain from northern barbarians to rescue a Roman nobleman and his family. (Why a Roman would be living in hostile terrain is a mystery.) This means venturing into woods filled with their traditional enemy, heavily tattooed guerrilla fighters known as the Woads led by the mysterious shaman Merlin (Stephen Dillane). Much worse, they will probably confront the invading Saxons led by Cerdic (Stellan Skarsgard) and Cynric (Til Schweiger), who mean to take over Britain once the Romans decamp.

It is on this mission that Arthur not only meets his Guinevere (Keira Knightley) and learns that the privilege of being a subject of the Roman Empire can mean slavery to many, but he also discovers his soul. As he joins forces with Merlin to take a stand against the Saxons -- early practitioners of "ethnic cleansing" -- he shocks himself with the realization that he is more a Briton than a Roman.

"I belong to this land. Where do you belong, Arthur?" demands Guinevere. His Rome no longer exists except in his mind. Corrupt and dissolving, Rome has fallen to totalitarian instincts and decadence. So Arthur quickly reinvents himself as a freedom fighter who will stand by the British people to turn back the Saxon hordes. (The notion of Arthur as a freedom fighter rings false historically because 1,000 years of feudalism lie ahead for the British people.)

In most epics, we barely meet characters before they are off and running. Here, carefully written dialogue scenes (a few a tad pedantic), all wonderfully played by the excellent cast, establish characters and situations before battles rage.

Owen is very much associated with contemporary roles, so it's initially a jolt to see him in fifth century armor. But this is very much a contemporary take on the Dark Ages, and he is most effective playing against the usual heroic gallantry one associates with King Arthur. Instead, we get a conflicted leader, struggling to find the right path through an unknown ethical battlefield.

Gruffudd's Lancelot is less a son to Arthur than alter ego and his conscience. He is ever on hand to point out Arthur's dilemmas and urge pragmatic solutions. Knightley's Guinevere is, admittedly, a male fantasy figure. A damsel in distress when first we meet her, she suddenly transforms into a warrior princess, possessing furious guerrilla fighting skills and outfitted most fetchingly in a skimpy leather get-up, armbands and henna-like body makeup more at home at a fetish club than in hand-to-hand combat with men in full body armor. But Knightley is sexually alive in every scene, even when lying in filth in a dungeon, and gives the film an eroticism it would otherwise lack.

The villains are terrific. Skarsgard's bearded Saxon leader, looking like a foul priest, is cruel and sadistic but with high intelligence and a zeal to encounter the great Arthur. Schweiger is pure Teutonic evil, his eagerness to kill almost comical.

Fuqua encourages most of his male warriors to play their parts with a heavy-limbed lassitude, reminding us that these guys have lived on battlefields for years. His battle scenes are brilliantly staged so we can quickly surmise the strategies that will win the day and feel the ruthlessness of fighting in close quarters. One especially dramatic encounter on dangerously thin ice in a mountain passage is one of the great cinematic fight scenes of all times.

Slawomir Idziak's moody, elegant cinematography of a wintry Britain -- actually Ireland -- sets a somber, tense tone where enemies lurk in the mist and behind every bush. Hans Zimmer's fulsome orchestral score nourishes the accelerating dramatic stakes. Dan Weil's sets are notably rustic, but costumes and hairdos supply a touch of glamour. After all, King Arthur and his knights still have a reputation to maintain.

KING ARTHUR

Buena Vista Pictures

Touchstone Pictures/Jerry Bruckheimer Films

Credits:

Director: Antoine Fuqua

Writer: David Franzoni

Producer: Jerry Bruckheimer

Executive producers: Mike Stenson, Chad Oman, Ned Dowd

Director of photography: Slawomir Idziak

Production designer: Dan Weil

Music: Hans Zimmer

Costume designer: Penny Rose

Editors: Conrad Buff, Jamie Pearson

Cast:

Arthur: Clive Owen

Lancelot: Ioan Gruffudd

Tristan: Mads Mikkelsen

Gawain: Joel Edgerton

Galahad: Hugh Dancy

Bors: Ray Winstone

Dagonet: Ray Stevenson

Guinevere: Keira Knightley

Merlin: Stephen Dillane

Cerdic: Stellan Skarsgard

Cynric: Til Schweiger

MPAA rating PG-13

Running time -- 126 minutes »

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'Robot' leads o'seas charge with $20.8 mil weekend

3 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Despite slips of 10%-50% at the boxoffice in many European territories, a number of key films continued to chalk up solid returns in the face of a period of especially pleasant outdoor weather. Twentieth Century Fox's I, Robot joined the blockbuster parade as summer tentpoles Spider-Man 2, King Arthur, Shrek 2 and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban added to their overseas laurels. In addition, the documentary phenomenon Fahrenheit 9/11 and the German sci-fi spoof (T)Raumschiff Surprise -- Periode 1 maintained a strong pace. Smaller pieces of the weekend boxoffice action went to Garfield, The Stepford Wives, Home on the Range and early dates of Catwoman. »

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'I, Robot' tops international boxoffice

1 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Spider-Man 2 continued its exceptional run in international markets, easily beating King Arthur and Shrek 2. But it was the Will Smith starrer I, Robot that took the No. 1 spot for distributor 20th Century Fox at the international boxoffice over the weekend, according to estimates. I, Robot took in about $20.5 million from 3,398 screens in 17 territories during the weekend, for a cumulative total to date of about $29.6 million. The sci-fi actioner opened No. 1 in France (with just over $5 million from 749 screens), Spain ($4.65 million from 450), South Korea ($2.5 million on 243, against opener Van Helsing), Mexico ($1.91 million from 570) and Taiwan ($1.75 million from 255). The film maintained the top spot in Australia in its second week with $1.83 million from 347 theaters, off 45% but topping openers Fahrenheit 9/11 and The Chronicles of Riddick ($1.1 million from 185). »

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'I, Robot' tops international boxoffice

1 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Spider-Man 2 continued its exceptional run in international markets, easily beating King Arthur and Shrek 2. But it was the Will Smith starrer I, Robot that took the No. 1 spot for distributor 20th Century Fox at the international boxoffice over the weekend, according to estimates. I, Robot took in about $20.5 million from 3,398 screens in 17 territories during the weekend, for a cumulative total to date of about $29.6 million. The sci-fi actioner opened No. 1 in France (with just over $5 million from 749 screens), Spain ($4.65 million from 450), South Korea ($2.5 million on 243, against opener Van Helsing), Mexico ($1.91 million from 570) and Taiwan ($1.75 million from 255). The film maintained the top spot in Australia in its second week with $1.83 million from 347 theaters, off 45% but topping openers "Fahrenheit 9/11" and The Chronicles of Riddick ($1.1 million from 185). »

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'Arthur' fares better o'seas; tentpoles holding hot pace

27 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With a batch of tentpole entries playing around the world, the summer boxoffice overseas continued to thrive despite a falloff in parts of Europe because of fine outdoor weather. Highlights of a busy weekend included the early foreign turnaround of Walt Disney Co. domestic disappointment King Arthur, the record-breaking top-of-the-market opening of Germany's homemade (T)Raumschiff Surprise -- Periode 1 (Spaceship Surprise -- Period 1, the unofficial English translation), the offshore market's ongoing approval of Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 and the holdover power of Spider-Man 2, Shrek 2 and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. »

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Knightley Wants To Be a Better Actress

27 July 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood beauty Keira Knightley refuses to consider herself a real actress - because she thinks she has a long way to go before she's at the top of her profession. The King Arthur star views her current acting work as part of a learning curve, and has yet to feel comfortable with her on-screen performances. Knightley, 19, comments, "I don't think I can call myself an actress yet. I just don't think my skill level if that high. I hope that with every job it gets better. But until I'm good, I can say I'm trying to be an actor, but I don't think I've completely made it." And Knightley didn't find her role as Guinevere in the Camelot epic tested her thespian abilities. She says, "I had to work out physically quite a bit, but pretty much it's scream a lot and enjoy being painted blue." »

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Buena Vista's 'King Arthur' continues to reign abroad

25 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- BVI's King Arthur continued its rollout this week, taking the No. 1 spot in several of the 14 territories in which it played for estimated weekend totals of $7.7 million and an international cumulative boxoffice of about $15 million. The medieval tale took in about $3.2 million ahead of the opening of Shrek 2 in Japan, where the film charmed an extra $2.9 million out of the public. DreamWorks' Shrek 2, distributed internationally by UIP, collected an extra $17 million this weekend for an international cume of $335 million. King Arthur came up trumps in Sweden and Norway ($450,000). In Taiwan, the film took in an estimated $450,000 in holdovers, while in Australia, with the holidays over, King Arthur came in at No. 2, off 55% after 11 days in the market, to $5.1 million. »

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