Meet Georgia Lass (who prefers to be called George). She is a young Seattle college dropout who is unhappy with life. She is always at odds with her mom, Joy. One day coming back from her ... See full summary »

Creator:

Reviews
Popularity
1,125 ( 60)

Watch Now

on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Episodes

Seasons


Years



2   1  
2004   2003  
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 6 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Georgia 'George' Lass (29 episodes, 2003-2004)
...
 Mason (29 episodes, 2003-2004)
...
 Roxy Harvey (29 episodes, 2003-2004)
...
 Rube Sofer (29 episodes, 2003-2004)
...
 Joy Lass (29 episodes, 2003-2004)
...
 Reggie Lass (27 episodes, 2003-2004)
...
 Delores Herbig (27 episodes, 2003-2004)
...
 Daisy Adair (24 episodes, 2003-2004)
Crystal Dahl ...
 Crystal / ... (22 episodes, 2003-2004)
Greg Kean ...
 Clancy Lass (22 episodes, 2003-2004)
Patricia Idlette ...
 Kiffany / ... (21 episodes, 2003-2004)
Talia Ranger ...
 Young George (15 episodes, 2003-2004)
Edit

Storyline

Meet Georgia Lass (who prefers to be called George). She is a young Seattle college dropout who is unhappy with life. She is always at odds with her mom, Joy. One day coming back from her temp job as a filing clerk, she is hit by the toilet seat of the re-entering Space Station Mir. Finding out she is now dead, she is recruited to become a grim reaper. As in life, she is a pain in the butt in death. She does not like the details of her job, and is always at loggerheads with her boss Rube. Her fellow grim reapers don't really take much of a liking to her either. She also learns grim reapers don't even get a free ride in death, as they must hold down regular jobs along with their death duties. Written by Pat McCurry <laraspal00@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Reaper madness. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Fantasy

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

27 June 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dead Girl  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The set for Der Waffle Haus was used extensively in Stargate SG-1, S08E18 - Threads. Daniel Jackson, played by Michael Shanks, sat at their regular booth and ordered waffles. See more »

Quotes

George: Hi, Lydia. You've temped for them before. There's a dress code and your skirt needs to actually cover your ass... I don't care where your tattoo is, you cannot show crack at the office.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Episodes in which clips from previous episodes are used (in particular the flashback episode, Nighthawks) give screen credit to the writers of any excerpts that are used, even if the clip is momentary. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Face Off: Mortal Sins (2013) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

One of the most creative shows on television since Twin Peaks
16 June 2004 | by (USA) – See all my reviews

"Dead Like Me" proves that cynicism, humor, depth, and even compassion can not only co-exist on a single television series, they can actually flourish together. With sharp and witty writing and directing, "Dead Like Me" explores the bizarre world of our working-class grim reapers, the good folks charged with escorting human souls to the afterlife. As the second-lowest level group of bureaucrats in the afterlife system (best not to ask about the lowest), grim reapers must trudge along "popping" the souls of the soon-to-be-departed before they meet their grisly (and, dare I say, often hilarious) ends. And they must also survive, and pay rent, in the living world.

The chief protagonist on the series is George (a.k.a. Georgia), a recently deceased, uber-cynical, 18 year old who just can't seem to resist rebelling against the whole "death" system. Her fellow reapers include an unapologetically opportunistic drug-smuggler, a meter-maid who does a lot more than write parking tickets, a happy-go-lucky pragmatist who has developed a truly macabre taste in photography, and an actress whose resume is surprisingly out of date. And then, of course, there is Rube.

Rube is the would-be foreman of this somewhat strange assemblage of reapers. He is also, arguably, the most sympathetic, complex, and mysterious character on the showâ€'thanks in no small part to the superb acting of Mandy Patinkin. As with the other characters on the show, no amount of space here can really hint at the depth alloted to Rube by the writers and directors of "Dead Like Me" or the skill with which Patinkin explores that depth. Suffice it to say that Rube plays a lot more like a real person (or real undead person) than any mere television contrivance. Rube is more alive as a dead man than any television character from the living world.

The very essence of "Dead Like Me" is, in fact, its willingness to explore not only the bizarre world of the reapers, but also the lives and personalities of the reapers themselves. Undead life has had (and continues to have) some pretty strange effects on these formerly-living reapers, and watching their individual responses to the problems of their bizarre occupation provides much of the humor of the show.

And, not to leave out the living world, the creative minds behind "Dead Like Me," also frequently turn their attention to living characters on the show, from the "soon to be referred to the past tense" reaper clients to the families they leave behind (most notably George's grieving family). Just about any character is subject to being fleshed-out on this show (even dogs and frogs). A minor character named Angus Cook makes a more memorable impression in one episode of "Dead Like Me" (appropriately titled "A. Cook") than most TV series regulars will make in an entire season.

Some have compared "Dead Like Me" with shows like "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and similar, more pedestrian, fare. But about the only thing Buffy and George have in common is youth and blonde hair. And the only thing the reapers have in common with television vampires is that they've both been around a while. Of course, one of the problems with television vampires is that they never seem to *realize* they've been around a while. They are also generally kind enough to join up with either the "good guys" or "bad guys" teams of the Buffyverse and its ilk, teams which don't exist in the universe of "Dead Like Me."

But you might want to visit the universe of "Dead Like Me" for yourself, and form your own impressions. Just don't stay too long. You might end up with a post-it note and a new job.


113 of 123 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page