Henry and Brown, two business men occupying offices next to each other, are in need of a stenographer. Their wives call on them and find their husbands upset because they cannot handle ... See full summary »
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Henry
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Brown
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First Wife
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Second Wife
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Storyline

Henry and Brown, two business men occupying offices next to each other, are in need of a stenographer. Their wives call on them and find their husbands upset because they cannot handle their correspondence. Each offers to do her husband's stenographic work. The men refuse to entertain the suggestion. The two men are well acquainted; the two women have never met until they come across each other at the foot of the elevator, on entering the building. Mrs. Henry and Mrs. Brown meet again on leaving the building, tell the nature of their husband's business troubles and become interested in each other. Henry and Brown compare notes. They place "ads" in the paper. Mrs. Henry and Mrs. Brown see the advertisements. Mrs. Henry applies for the position at Brown's and Mrs. Brown for the position at Henry's. Both are engaged. The men meet again to compare notes. Brown says he "has a peach" and Henry says "he has a daisy." Brown tells of a date with his at "Shamley's and Henry at "Hester's" for ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Comedy | Short

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Release Date:

17 April 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The principals, especially the "merry wives," Leah Baird and Lillian Walker acquit themselves nobly
4 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is a very clever comedy in which the principals, especially the "merry wives," Leah Baird and Lillian Walker acquit themselves nobly. Not only is the story strictly original, but it is developed in a very able fashion and keeps the audience in good humor and likewise in suspense pretty well to the end. The uniformly clever work of Bunny is one of the features of this comedy. Comedies of this kind are a welcome boon to the exhibitor at all times. The atmosphere is refined and true to life in every inch of the film. The situations are genuinely laughable and the climaxes are especially well carried off. Settings and photography are of the perfect kind, which the Vitagraph Company has made us familiar with. - The Moving Picture World, May 4, 1912


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