Manuelo, a poor Mexican, ill with fever and newly married, is penniless. He gets up from his bed and goes to the nearest town to find food. Having no money, he steals a few beans and is ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
George Stanley ...
Manuelo
...
Papeta, Manuelo's Wife (as Anne Schaeffer)
Charles Bennett
Edit

Storyline

Manuelo, a poor Mexican, ill with fever and newly married, is penniless. He gets up from his bed and goes to the nearest town to find food. Having no money, he steals a few beans and is kicked out as a "lazy Greaser." He returns to his wife. While they are talking the matter over, a rancher from the mountains comes to their door and offers him a job as a sheep herder. His wife bravely urges him to go. Once in the mountains, he is treated like a dog. In his dreams, he has a vision, suggestive of his wife, with a new born babe. His mind is disturbed and he longs to go to her. He asks for a leave of a few days. The head herdsman refuses his request. Manuelo bides his time and at night he steals away. He walks miles and miles. His strength fails and he sinks down towards evening near an open field. In this field a horse is tethered. He takes the animal and rides away. The owner sees him. He calls his men, who bring their horses and a rope; they ride in hot pursuit. The Mexican reaches his... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 June 1912 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

The impression that the picture leaves is distinctly religious
25 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A picture of two very simple-hearted and devout Mexicans, Manuelo (played by George Stanley) and Papeta, his wife (by Ann Schaefer). Their lot in life is very lowly; but they appeal to a saint whose statue stands in its niche of wood at the desert's edge. The prayers are answered. We see it all as natural luck; Manuelo sees it as a miracle. The impression that the picture leaves is distinctly religious; it could hardly have been written by anyone but a devout believer or by one in the surest sympathy with the simple folk he pictures. It seems to us out of the ordinary, A good picture, well acted, pretty well photographed. - The Moving Picture World, June 15, 1912


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Prayers of Manuelo (1912) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?