IMDb > Naked World: America Undercover (2003) (TV)

Naked World: America Undercover (2003) (TV) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

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Release Date:
September 2003 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
One year. Seven continents. More than 6,000 naked people--all willing to bare all for Spencer Tunick in the name of art... See more » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Not a documentary, more a record of events with barely any critical analysis See more (9 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Spencer Tunick ... Himself
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Ronald Kuby ... Himself (as Ron Kuby)
Jonathan Porcelli ... Himself

Alec Von Bargen ... Himself

Directed by
Arlene Nelson  (as Arlene Donnelly Nelson)
 
Produced by
Nancy Abraham .... supervising producer
Louise Barlow .... supervising producer
Lisa Hepner .... producer: Australia segment
Dave Linstrom .... producer: Australia segment (as David Linstrom)
Arlene Nelson .... producer (as Arlene Donnelly Nelson)
David Nelson .... executive producer
Sheila Nevins .... executive producer
Heather Ross .... associate producer
Helen Hood Scheer .... producer
 
Original Music by
Chris Hajian 
Leigh Roberts 
 
Cinematography by
Dave Linstrom  (as David Linstrom)
Arlene Nelson  (as Arlene Donnelly Nelson)
 
Film Editing by
Tom Donahue 
 
Art Department
Mike Smith .... graphics
 
Sound Department
Chris Aiken .... sound editor
Stéphane Barsalou .... sound recordist
Christopher Eakins .... foley editor
Darryl L. Frank .... sound mixer
Matt Hedges .... sound editorial coordinator
Jeff Hodd .... assistant sound engineer: South Africa
Matt Israel .... assistant sound engineer: New York
Eddie Kim .... sound editor
Luiz Adelmo Manzano .... sound recordist (as Luiz Adelmo)
John Marcus .... sound editor
John Marquis .... dialogue editor
George Mavroenyi .... assistant sound engineer: Australia
Joe Milner .... sound re-recording mixer
Joe Milner .... supervising sound editor
Eryne Prine .... assistant sound editor
Peter Vasey .... assistant sound engineer: England (as Peter Vaisey)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Brett Albright .... additional director of photography: New York, Canada
John Brawley .... additional camera operator: Australia
John Chater .... additional director of cinematography: England
Rod Coates .... additional camera operator: Australia
Ermanno Dibiaggi .... additional director of cinematography: Italy
Tom Donahue .... camera operator: second unit, New York
Luke Everson .... assistant camera: England
Mat Govoni .... assistant camera: Australia
Graham Maunder .... additional camera operator: England
Arnaldo Mesquita .... additional director of photography: Brazil
Peter Nelson .... additional director of photography: France/Ireland/Russia
Michel Petrin .... additional director of cinematography: Montreal
Dario Salpietro .... additional camera operator: Australia
Maurico Tabinica .... assistant camera: Brazil
 
Editorial Department
Harry Johnson .... colorist
Jill Schweitzer .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Bob Brockman .... music mixer
Charles Giordano .... musician: accordions (as Charlie Giordano)
Chris Hajian .... music mixer
Chris Hajian .... music producer
Chris Hajian .... musician: synthetic programming
Bashiri Johnson .... musician: percussion
Will Lee .... musician: bass
Andy Oyer .... musician: electric guitar
Leigh Roberts .... music mixer
Leigh Roberts .... music producer
Leigh Roberts .... musician: synthetic programming
Sasha Ross .... music assistance
Larry Saltzman .... musician: electric guitar & sitar, dobro and tiple
Helen Hood Scheer .... co-music supervisor
Bernd Schoenhart .... musician: electric and acoustic guitars
Jill Schweitzer .... co-music supervisor
 
Other crew
Jamie Berger .... office production assistant
Lia Brennan .... location production assistant: Ireland
Atmadev Cornelius .... title designer: main titles (as Atma Cornelius)
Heath Cozens .... fixer: Japan
Heath Cozens .... location translator: Japan
Jamilia Dawson .... office production assistant
Alexis Fish .... production coordinator
Peter Gloyne .... location production assistant: South Africa
Jeremy Kahn .... translation services
Rebecca Kritsch .... fixer: Brazil
Rebecca Kritsch .... location translator: Brazil
Mike Lister .... office production assistant
Laura McIntosh .... office production assistant
Sudipta Nandi .... office production assistant
Ryan Nelson .... key production assistant
Mary Posatko .... office production assistant
Jonas Raible .... translation services
Guillermo Rivetti Berna .... location production assistant: Brazil
Tootsie Schreiber .... transcriptor
Jennifer Sharpe .... title designer: main titles
Bill Soule .... office production assistant
Kat Sripathy .... office production assistant
Larin Sullivan .... office production assistant
Christopher Trela .... attache: Antarctic
Asya Yevdokimova .... fixer: Russia
Asya Yevdokimova .... location translator: Russia
 
Thanks
Chhaya Bhanti .... special thanks
Krissy Bowler .... very special thanks
Laurence Cates .... special thanks
Bill Chase .... special thanks
Jodi Cohen .... special thanks
Luis Dantos .... special thanks
Mary Dinaburg .... special thanks
Arthur Donnelly .... special thanks
Rawia Edwards .... special thanks
Andrew Einhorn .... acknowledgment: additional footage provided by
Richard Farmer .... special thanks
Jimmy Greenway .... special thanks
Michael Halatyn .... special thanks
Paul Hedge .... special thanks
John Hoffman .... special thanks
Justin Jay .... special thanks
Paul Judelson .... very special thanks
Ronald Kuby .... special thanks (as Ron Kuby)
Danielle Legentil .... special thanks
Heather Love .... special thanks
Sandra Marchand .... special thanks
Kevin Maynard .... special thanks
Ian McCausland .... special thanks
Matthew Morgan .... special thanks
Sean Mullens .... special thanks
Jonathan Porcelli .... very special thanks
Oliver Power .... special thanks
Sally Roy .... special thanks
Danielle Schleif .... special thanks
Miria Swain .... special thanks
Lars Ullberg .... very special thanks
Nadya Vnoukov .... special thanks
 

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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Naked World" - USA (short title)
See more »
Runtime:
76 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »

FAQ

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8 out of 13 people found the following review useful.
Not a documentary, more a record of events with barely any critical analysis, 16 May 2004
Author: bob the moo from United Kingdom

The New York based artist Spencer Tunick takes pictures of nudes in public places – contrasting the naked bodies with the harsh architecture of the cities etc. Fed up of being arrested in New York for public indecency he decides to set out to go across the globe taking nude shots as well as doing group shots of nudes. With each country he gets different problems and benefits – the French are the most reserved, the Japanese afraid of losing jobs for being naked and the Australians barely need to be asked twice.

I generally seem to have a problem with modern art because some of it deliberately tries to be controversial and actually have very little merit other than shock value. The argument that this type of art is good because 'it gets people talking and brings people to all art' is nonsense and never washes with me. However, I generally try to reserve judgement on things until I actually see it – hence me watching this film. I have already seen some of Tunick's work and was quite unimpressed by it, I didn't get the point and just saw it doing stuff that gets headlines. Watching this film I got an impression of the logistics of organising the shoots as well as the motivation of the people who had agreed to get naked. Other that this the film manages to deliver very little other than the interest/curiosity factor of watching lots of people pose nude in public places.

What I wanted was insight: basically Tunick is given lots of chances to really talk about his work and his aims but he doesn't take any of them, only giving vague comments about his intentions – in fact he contradicts himself when he agrees with a South African's concept of his work (in order to get him to pose). As well as missing this chance to help us philistines understand his work, Tunick also comes over as selfish, rude, pushy and full of his own sense of self-importance. He insults people on the street and calls them 'rude' for walking past him as he hands out fliers (we all walk past these people everyday), he gets angry for the police for arresting him (accusing them of basically being idiots). When he is asked what makes his picture special, he replies 'because I took it'. The film only allows about three critically voices in the whole film – and all three of them are Australians who are given seconds to say a quick soundbite or two each. Contrast this with the huge amount of adoring voices surrounding him – only the head of the Russian Museum dares to question him, but even then she concedes to him. All those around him seem to hang on his every word and treat him as if he is doing the most important thing in the world. Even more insulting is how people who 'don't get it' are viewed – they are seen as idiots, the Japanese are openly attacked as being corporate drones.

Those looking for critical insight will also be disappointed because nobody dares ask anything challenging of Tunick. Where does his money come from is what I was interested to know – he flies all over the world but then ends the film complaining about not selling enough pictures. He loves the media and he acts up for the camera, seemingly overjoyed at the chance to talk one to one to the camera. This greatly weakens the film's value – if you love his work and see him as an important artist doing important things then it is likely you will enjoy this. However if you dislike him or are unsure of your stance, then this will do nothing for you – Tunick shows himself to be lacking ideas and comes across as arrogant and self-important, completely wasting the chance to just honestly and without pretension say what his work is about.

Overall this is an interesting film in terms of logistics and the chance to see unusual sight of lots of people getting naked in unusual places. However I came to it willing to be won over to Tunick's vision but only found a rather empty film that lost ant potential I thought it had. Novelty interest - yes; but artistic value or creative insight? No. (And, as an aside, what was with all the use of subtitles? The film uses subtitles for people speaking English! Understandable with one or two very thick accents but it also subtitles people in Australia and London! Did HBO an American audience would struggle with anyone not speaking with a raised inflection?!)

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