Lake Patzcuaro, located 230 miles west of Mexico City, is one of the highest and most picturesque bodies of water in Mexico. The heritage of the indigenous peoples of the area, the ... See full summary »
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Lake Patzcuaro, located 230 miles west of Mexico City, is one of the highest and most picturesque bodies of water in Mexico. The heritage of the indigenous peoples of the area, the Tarascans, still prevails, such as the production of lacquer-ware handicrafts, and the means of hunting and fishing, the latter which uses nets shaped like large butterfly wings. Although most current day Tarascans are Roman Catholic, they have not totally abandoned their indigenous pagan gods. On Janitzio, one of the many islands in the lake, stands a large statue commemorating José María Morelos, a prominent figure in Mexican liberation and a great benefactor to the Tarascans. Janitzio is also the inspiration for many famous paintings. The town of Tzintzuntzan just inland from the lake's shore acts as the regional center for the market and for festivals. Written by Huggo

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Documentary | Short

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23 May 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

FitzPatrick Traveltalks: Picturesque Patzcuaro  »

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(RCA Sound System)

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(Technicolor)
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TravelTalks
18 July 2011 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Picturesque Patzcuaro (1942)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

Nice entry in MGM's TravelTalks series has James A. Fitzpatrick traveling to Lake Patzcuaro, which is about two-hundred and thirty miles west of Mexico City. Once there we're introduced to the Tarascan Indians who live there and we learn that the tribe originally took shelter there to get away from the white man. In the village we see the people fish, hunt and make lacquer-ware crafts, which are sold to make some extra money. We also learn how they make their fishing nets and that their children agree that silence is golden. If you've seen any of the TravelTalks films then you know that the Technicolor is one of the main draws and that remains true here because there are some beautiful images that jump off the screen. With the beautiful nature on display I was shocked but my main interest here were the lacquer crafts because seeing how much detail went into them was quite impressive. As normal, Fitzpatrick does a very good job at giving us a brief introduction to the history of the place and of course the visuals are always nice.


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