6.5/10
1,771
19 user 6 critic

Eloise at the Plaza 

Eloise is an imaginative little girl living in New York City with her nanny, going on various adventures.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (drawings) | 2 more credits »
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Won 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 1 win. See more awards »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Mr. Salomone
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Sir Wilkes
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Maggie
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Molly Daniels
Eve Crawford ...
Mrs. Daniels
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Mr. Peabody (as Victor Young)
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Mrs. Thornton
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Prunella Stickler
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Denis Akiyama ...
Prince of Kushin (as Dennis Akiyama)
Kintaro Akiyama ...
Flossie McKnight ...
Head of Housekeeping (as Araxi Arslanian)
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Storyline

Eloise is an imaginative little girl living in New York City with her nanny, going on various adventures.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Parents Guide:

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Details

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Country:

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Release Date:

27 April 2003 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The line, "think pink", and indeed, the whole pink theme comes from Eloise creator Kay Thompson's iconic role in Funny Face, also starring Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astair. Kay Thompson sings a song with the refrain, "think pink" in that film. See more »

Goofs

Eloise (Sofia Vassilieva) has teeth that are clearly not those of a six year old. See more »

Quotes

Nanny: Eloise... being bored is not allowed.
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User Reviews

a charming story about a precocious 6-year-old who lives at the Plaza
28 April 2003 | by See all my reviews

The actress who plays Eloise cannot be only 6, but is just wonderful. She is assertive and good-hearted without being either bratty or cloying. Julie Andrews is a great lady who allows herself to look plain, but still manages to be captivating. I watched it because I loved the book as a child, but found it entertaining for adults as well. I'm looking forward to the next, at Christmastime.


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