St. Elmo, a wealthy young man, is betrothed to his cousin Agnes. Dick Hammond, St. Elmo's chum, is studying for the ministry. As soon as he is ordained he is to take charge of a church ... See full summary »

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Cast

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St. Elmo (as Frank H. Crane)
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Agnes
Gertrude Thanhouser
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Storyline

St. Elmo, a wealthy young man, is betrothed to his cousin Agnes. Dick Hammond, St. Elmo's chum, is studying for the ministry. As soon as he is ordained he is to take charge of a church built for him by St. Elmo. Hammond, however, takes St. Elmo's friendship lightly and makes love to Agnes in secret. The affair is discovered by St. Elmo, who, in a rage at Hammond's perfidy, challenge him to a duel. The false friend loses his life in the ensuing combat. Edna, the granddaughter of the village blacksmith, strays upon the scene of the duel, an uninvited witness. St. Elmo is forced to flee the country. He is pursued by Agnes and the sheriff. Edna tells her first lie when she deceives St. Elmo's pursuers as to his direction and leads them completely off the trail. St. Elmo makes good his escape. On the day that Edna witnesses the duel her grandfather dies, leaving her alone in the world. She is adopted by St. Elmo's mother. Five years later the fugitive returns. Edna recognizes him as the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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22 March 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Not what might be termed an engaging story
27 March 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The second release of a new house, and, unlike some producers', the second was better than the first. It was not what might be termed an engaging story which this firm undertook to present. The play is based upon Augusta Evans Wilson's novel of the same name. It is a religious novel and the dramatic company which has tried to play it has failed to satisfy in all places with one exception. Of course the film is an improvement over the spoken drama, since it is shortened and only the interesting scenes are retained. While the writer has no particular liking for either the story or the drama, he has no fault to find with the reproduction here. It is better than the drama because it eliminates much that is dreary and practically unnecessary to make the story comprehensible and leaves only the better and stronger scenes. The acting is sympathetic and the photographer has performed his part satisfactorily. - The Moving Picture World, April 2, 1910


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